1

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Any farmers? I could use ideas/resources...

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 04, 2012 at 1:13 AM

I currently live on 150 acre farm that is being conventionally farmed by someone else. Eventually the hubby and I want to take it over and turn it into an organic farm. That has to wait for better finances, but we would like to start this spring/summer by adding laying chickens and milking goats. Besides craigslist, does anyone know of places I can get some help for supplies/resources/knowledge in getting started?

F4aff43df6a8a49a1c3879c1233ee560

(459)

on January 05, 2012
at 04:33 AM

I'll contact you via your blog to give you some more info.

B33f7c04c09d8bbbf181dd8aca04f373

(554)

on January 05, 2012
at 12:05 AM

Hammondsport :) On Keuka Lake, so not too terribly far from Ithaca :)

F4aff43df6a8a49a1c3879c1233ee560

(459)

on January 04, 2012
at 02:48 PM

Cornell extension also has a small farm program: http://www.smallfarms.cornell.edu/ Lot's of info for starting up. If you're near Ithaca, I can help you further.

B33f7c04c09d8bbbf181dd8aca04f373

(554)

on January 04, 2012
at 03:14 AM

:) @Matt 100 acres of what is currently conventionally farmd feed corn, 15 acres of concord grape vines, 35 acres of timber, plus 2 houses, a run down chicken coop and a stripped dairy barn. The chickens and goats we could start on the house acre-yard with minimal rehab. This would be mostly personal consumption and let us get a feel for caring for livestock. Plus of course the benefits of the eggs and raw dairy.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 04, 2012
at 03:02 AM

150 acres of what? That'll determine what you do with it. Chickens and goats don't take up 150 acres, that's for sure!

B33f7c04c09d8bbbf181dd8aca04f373

(554)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:52 AM

I knew Cornell would be up there :) the co-op extension does a lot in the area, but I hadn't gotten around to searching for the links. Thank you for the help!

B33f7c04c09d8bbbf181dd8aca04f373

(554)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:50 AM

Thank you for the tip! I will look into that site soon :)

B33f7c04c09d8bbbf181dd8aca04f373

(554)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:48 AM

I can't lease it to anybody as we don't own it. Our landlord would rather lease to us for an organic farm than the guy who faems it now as we manage/caretake the rest of his property :)

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on January 04, 2012
at 01:43 AM

You could lease it to someone organic to start the process.

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3 Answers

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1
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:34 AM

Cornell Organic programs - http://cuaes.cornell.edu/organic/ for knowledge and advice on where to get supplies locally

Also check this list - http://www.agriculture.ny.gov/RelatedLinks.html

and other sections at the NY Department of Agriculture - http://www.agriculture.ny.gov/

B33f7c04c09d8bbbf181dd8aca04f373

(554)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:52 AM

I knew Cornell would be up there :) the co-op extension does a lot in the area, but I hadn't gotten around to searching for the links. Thank you for the help!

1
B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:43 AM

Small Farm Today is an excellent magazine for people who are wanting to start a non-conventional small farm, including tips for raising livestock, building hoop houses, growing organic veggies, direct marketing your produce or meat, added value products etc. Heck, I love reading the magazine and dreaming about being an organic farmer in another life! I really love it.

http://www.smallfarmtoday.com/

Edit: I'll also add that your state's agricultural extension office may have a lot of good resources, especially about pest management and farming techniques. They can also put you in touch with programs like Practical Farmers of Iowa (or whatever state you live in) where you can go to see on-farm demonstrations and have your questions answered.

B33f7c04c09d8bbbf181dd8aca04f373

(554)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:50 AM

Thank you for the tip! I will look into that site soon :)

0
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on January 04, 2012
at 03:37 AM

Go to the USDA NOP site, and read all about it. Pay particular attention to the list of acceptable and banned inputs. Decide if you want to do this or not. Start keeping records NOW, what you put into the land, even save the brands, contact info, etc. There is a big list of NOP-approved stuff, so you'll have to start using that (more expense). Here's the site: http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/nop If you are going the farmer's market route or selling things yourself, you might want to question why you want certification. The big benefit is that other markets can purchase from you and spread it to other markets. But, if your customer knows you personally, they can just ask you what you do or even visit. You can just put up a website showing your compliance and people can look and see if they want to buy something from you, whether or not you have a pc. of paper on the wall. A good place to start is to contact your local organic farms (or visit at Farmer's markets) to find out who certifies them. Ask them what they think of their certifier. When you find a good one, you can contact them and they can give you more details.

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