4

votes

Could Alzheimer's be the most catastrophic impact of SAD

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 14, 2012 at 10:15 AM

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/sep/10/alzheimers-junk-food-catastrophic-effect

In the article it takes swings at both fat and salt, but other than that I found it quite interesting!

Also, my off the hip responce, none of this would have happened if you were eating Paleo...

says the guy who still drinks Pepsi

0e1e1fb7cb5ba898eed1976f988cdc37

(284)

on September 19, 2012
at 05:15 PM

I'm sorry to hear about your father. Mine is in the later stages and in a nursing home. His whole life he had little activity and ate tons of sugar and grains. It is scary to think of all the cases that will develop over the next several years if people continue with their poor diets.

E95216c62a14d21c371fcbf2fed8469b

(1867)

on September 15, 2012
at 05:20 PM

Marie that's why I'm studying to be an RN so I can make a difference. LPN's aren't supposed to ask why diabetic residents get potatoes mash for dinner. More education, enables me to say "shove your ada diet up your bunghole". Josh I spent this whole summer reading through the series, even the last one! haha

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 15, 2012
at 06:06 AM

Here is another one - it is all over now http://health.yahoo.net/experts/dayinhealth/new-junk-food-danger

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 15, 2012
at 02:16 AM

VB, if you click on my profile, you can find my website. My email address is in there under "Services," at the end.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on September 14, 2012
at 09:02 PM

Gene sequencing site 23andMe.com looks for that. Pricey though.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 14, 2012
at 05:41 PM

Also how do you tell if you have the ApoE4 genotype?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 14, 2012
at 05:22 PM

How to contact you off-site?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 14, 2012
at 03:16 PM

Here's another: http://www.anth.ucsb.edu/faculty/gurven/papers/GurvenKaplan2007pdr.pdf Figure 4 shows the high end to be between 85-95, with averages around 68-78 depending on the group (table 4) - so they're very similar to moderns in potential.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 14, 2012
at 03:06 PM

Um, no CD, cavemen didn't necessarily die in their 40s, you're thinking average age perhaps? Avg lifespan was skewed due to infant mortality, infections, predation. A broken leg usually meant death. This is a common point of ignorance. See: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/bone-dating-life-span/ and http://www.marksdailyapple.com/life-expectancy-hunter-gatherer/ for a better discussion.

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on September 14, 2012
at 02:04 PM

+1 for the Jean M. Auel reference :)

Medium avatar

(4878)

on September 14, 2012
at 02:01 PM

My dad is in a home now with PD and AD and has gained about 30 lbs from all the carbs (and "management drugs"). It has been so painful to watch such a dignified man be in this horrible place in life.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 14, 2012
at 11:39 AM

Or getting old. Remember, cavemen died in their 40s. We're good!

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6 Answers

3
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 14, 2012
at 04:35 PM

Finished my master's thesis just a few weeks ago on on Alzheimer's as type 3 diabetes and the potential therapeutic role of reduced-carbohydrate diets.

The topic is FASCINATING...and heartbreaking, as a wealth of scientific literature seems to indicate that the neuronal degeneration and death in AD is largely the result of dietary and lifestyle factors. Most notably, hyperinsulinemia. (Even worse when combined with the ApoE4 genotype, but deranged glucose metabolism and insulin signaling are enough all by themselves...)

Haven't had a chance to read the article you linked yet, but I'll take a look later.

Anyone who's interested in more details is welcome to contact me off-site.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on September 14, 2012
at 09:02 PM

Gene sequencing site 23andMe.com looks for that. Pricey though.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 14, 2012
at 05:41 PM

Also how do you tell if you have the ApoE4 genotype?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 14, 2012
at 05:22 PM

How to contact you off-site?

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 15, 2012
at 02:16 AM

VB, if you click on my profile, you can find my website. My email address is in there under "Services," at the end.

3
51c66d8a6f3005628535a50a950b1c61

(1003)

on September 14, 2012
at 12:08 PM

I've already lost one dear aunt to Alzheimer's, and another one is in its grip right now, so this hits close to home for me. I've read it's been called "Type III diabetes," which makes total sense to me.

Just one more good reason to eat paleo.I know I'm at greater risk for it with it in my family tree. I just wish I could convince my mom (who has the affected sisters) to move away from her AHA-approved type diet to paleo-ish.

3
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 14, 2012
at 11:37 AM

Only if you care about having a brain and being able to think. :)

No idea how it compares to just being alive, but I'm sure it would be extremely frustrating to be in that situation where everything you know vanishes, nor how aware you'd be that you're in that situation, but it can't be good.

Dr. Bruce Fife has some very interesting things about Alzheimers and maintaining lucidity by using Extra Virgin Coconut Oil as a source of ketones, which points the way towards it being a glucose metabolism issue.

As many people have said, the less carbs you get in your life time, the better off you are.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 14, 2012
at 03:16 PM

Here's another: http://www.anth.ucsb.edu/faculty/gurven/papers/GurvenKaplan2007pdr.pdf Figure 4 shows the high end to be between 85-95, with averages around 68-78 depending on the group (table 4) - so they're very similar to moderns in potential.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 14, 2012
at 03:06 PM

Um, no CD, cavemen didn't necessarily die in their 40s, you're thinking average age perhaps? Avg lifespan was skewed due to infant mortality, infections, predation. A broken leg usually meant death. This is a common point of ignorance. See: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/bone-dating-life-span/ and http://www.marksdailyapple.com/life-expectancy-hunter-gatherer/ for a better discussion.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 14, 2012
at 11:39 AM

Or getting old. Remember, cavemen died in their 40s. We're good!

2
E95216c62a14d21c371fcbf2fed8469b

(1867)

on September 14, 2012
at 12:20 PM

As a nurse who works in long term care, I can't think of anything worse than Alzheimer's Disease. At least there are many mainstream and alternative treatments for many cancers and I suffered along with my mom who had a rare cancer. I get attached to my elderly resident who I consider part of my clan ( and yes I'm a Jean M. Auel fan) and then watch them wither away. Or they become people who they never were and a wife watches a husband wither away :( It's just sad. And if Alzheimer's Disease IS type 3 diabetes, well nursing homes are hastening the effort.

E95216c62a14d21c371fcbf2fed8469b

(1867)

on September 15, 2012
at 05:20 PM

Marie that's why I'm studying to be an RN so I can make a difference. LPN's aren't supposed to ask why diabetic residents get potatoes mash for dinner. More education, enables me to say "shove your ada diet up your bunghole". Josh I spent this whole summer reading through the series, even the last one! haha

Medium avatar

(4878)

on September 14, 2012
at 02:01 PM

My dad is in a home now with PD and AD and has gained about 30 lbs from all the carbs (and "management drugs"). It has been so painful to watch such a dignified man be in this horrible place in life.

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on September 14, 2012
at 02:04 PM

+1 for the Jean M. Auel reference :)

2
8425f2fefc608f58a8cc0f2dcaa93341

(381)

on September 14, 2012
at 12:11 PM

I thought this was a fascinating article. For a number of people I know, including my father, the idea that Alzheimer's is a metabolic disease is right on. My father is showing the initial signs of dementia and has been borderline diabetic for years. When his diet consists of grains and sugars, such as when he goes on vacation, he tends to becomes highly forgetful and tends to wander off for hours at a time.

0e1e1fb7cb5ba898eed1976f988cdc37

(284)

on September 19, 2012
at 05:15 PM

I'm sorry to hear about your father. Mine is in the later stages and in a nursing home. His whole life he had little activity and ate tons of sugar and grains. It is scary to think of all the cases that will develop over the next several years if people continue with their poor diets.

1
B41cdb2253976ba9b429dd608d02c21f

(1495)

on September 14, 2012
at 12:16 PM

It's a slow painful death sentence that is difficult and expensive for both the person and the person's family. My grandmother had it. It's difficult to think about what she went through all those years.

Since reading the linked article, I've tried to think about what I knew of her life and if her diet may have contributed. I think it's possible. Just about everything she had in her home was processed foods. She also have a poor and very rough life...I suppose that could be a factor in addition or instead of SAD.

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