2

votes

Whey consumption to cut down on PUFAs?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 19, 2011 at 6:07 PM

I am considering adding Blue Bonnet whey to my diet. Thanks Jack for finding that brand.

http://www.bluebonnetnutrition.com/product/41/100%25_Natural_Whey_Protein_Isolate_Powder

The goal would be to displace a small portion of my meat protein with whey in order to reduce my overall PUFA levels. Any thoughts?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 19, 2011
at 09:49 PM

i'm sure that they work, and jack, based on your photo, they've worked quite nicely for you! i just don't think they're optimal. food is better than powder, and protein with fat is better than pure protein.

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on August 19, 2011
at 07:26 PM

I use the bluebonnet one too, it's a good brand. Plus whey protein could have some potential benefits http://www.nsca-lift.org/perform/articles/02055.pdf.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 19, 2011
at 07:06 PM

What about people who thrive on milk? sure it may be more concentrated with whey, but I only take one 25g scoop. someone who takes 4-5 25g scoops daily might be in more trouble.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:56 PM

Avoiding IGF is high on my list.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:53 PM

I suspect that my avoidance of these things is principally why I never made gains with lifting that were anything like those made by people taking protein supplements. It's not the protein, it's the growth factors.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:51 PM

Basically, IGF-1 levels in people who drink milk are significantly higher than those who don't. I think he said for children, it's 20-30% higher. He mentioned that it was measured in the whey fraction and that casein is likely even higher if I recall. However, if you isolated the whey, it's logical that the amount ingested would be way more than milk. Though it may not cause cancer, it would probably accelerate its growth and spread. In general, I think we want cellular growth and differentiation to occur within evolutionary limits.

F5698e16f1793c0bb00daea6a2e222a4

(678)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:43 PM

Wow, a lot of cool videos to watch there, thanks. Yes, I agree "unintended consequences" are possible. I've considered the pro and cons and decided to consume it for now.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:40 PM

I can't watch this right now but I will later. Out of curiosity, care to summarize a smidgen?

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:35 PM

Thanks for the link Travis!

F5698e16f1793c0bb00daea6a2e222a4

(678)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:30 PM

I use this powder - it's great stuff.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:21 PM

jakey - people have been using whey protein powders with great success for many decades now. your body definitely knows what to do with whey protein and it is a very 'real source'. ask yourself what is butter? is the process and end result to get whey protein much different than butter? i think some people definitely overdo it with the protein amounts, but everybody has different requirements based on their workout routine.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:21 PM

I agree with Travis, if reduction in PUFA is the goal, why not shift to beef, buffalo, etc.? Whey has been proven to cause a spike in insulin independent of carbohydrate content, so I personally limit its use.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:18 PM

Excellent point.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:17 PM

Thanks! I do eat fat with every meal..

Medium avatar

(39821)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:12 PM

Why not just eat red meat instead of chicken/pork?

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2 Answers

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4
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:13 PM

i'm not sure if this would be a boon as far as PUFAs go, perhaps it would. but i stand frimly against protein powders. i don't think they're nearly as good as eating real sources of protein, or even close. i also think that your body doesn't properly digest the protein you eat if you eat it without fat, so if you are going to use this powder, do add fat!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 19, 2011
at 09:49 PM

i'm sure that they work, and jack, based on your photo, they've worked quite nicely for you! i just don't think they're optimal. food is better than powder, and protein with fat is better than pure protein.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:21 PM

jakey - people have been using whey protein powders with great success for many decades now. your body definitely knows what to do with whey protein and it is a very 'real source'. ask yourself what is butter? is the process and end result to get whey protein much different than butter? i think some people definitely overdo it with the protein amounts, but everybody has different requirements based on their workout routine.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:17 PM

Thanks! I do eat fat with every meal..

0
Medium avatar

on August 19, 2011
at 06:24 PM

You may also want to watch this if you haven't already: http://vimeo.com/27671369

I'm fairly certain that the growth promoters in milk would be present in whey isolate and though this is conducive to muscle anabolism, there could very well be unintended consequences.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 19, 2011
at 07:06 PM

What about people who thrive on milk? sure it may be more concentrated with whey, but I only take one 25g scoop. someone who takes 4-5 25g scoops daily might be in more trouble.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:40 PM

I can't watch this right now but I will later. Out of curiosity, care to summarize a smidgen?

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:35 PM

Thanks for the link Travis!

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:56 PM

Avoiding IGF is high on my list.

F5698e16f1793c0bb00daea6a2e222a4

(678)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:43 PM

Wow, a lot of cool videos to watch there, thanks. Yes, I agree "unintended consequences" are possible. I've considered the pro and cons and decided to consume it for now.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:51 PM

Basically, IGF-1 levels in people who drink milk are significantly higher than those who don't. I think he said for children, it's 20-30% higher. He mentioned that it was measured in the whey fraction and that casein is likely even higher if I recall. However, if you isolated the whey, it's logical that the amount ingested would be way more than milk. Though it may not cause cancer, it would probably accelerate its growth and spread. In general, I think we want cellular growth and differentiation to occur within evolutionary limits.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:53 PM

I suspect that my avoidance of these things is principally why I never made gains with lifting that were anything like those made by people taking protein supplements. It's not the protein, it's the growth factors.

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