1

votes

Is frying with red palm oil really safe?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 19, 2013 at 9:49 AM

Red palm oil contains ~50% SFA, ~40% MUFA, and ~10% PUFA. Similar amount of PUFA is in olive oil which is not recommended for frying. Besides, high amount of MUFA is also not good for heating. So, is it really safe to fry with red palm oil? I believe that coconut oil seems to have much better fatty acid composition for frying.

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on May 19, 2013
at 05:26 PM

That's interesting about the vitamin E, I hadn't heard that before. I agree that olive oil is fine as long as your careful not to burn it like you said. I don't think lots of Paleo eaters are cooking with high heat anyways unless your pan searing, and that's a different story.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:43 PM

It's not the fat that's the problem with EVOO, it's the phytochemicals (i.e. the green color) that ultimately burn first. I take care not to burn my oils when cooking. Red palm oil does burn easily, smoking only a few seconds after melting sometimes. Makes it a good choice for eggs, as you don't need high heat to cook them. And it can make scrambled eggs from store-bought conventional eggs as colorful those made from the best free-range eggs.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:22 PM

Since most pan frying is high heat frying, I'd always avoid EVOO. Light OO may work better for those committed to only using types of olive oil for cooking. Sometimes people are afraid of using EVOO in a non-direct heat source, which I agree is silly, but pan-frying with EVOO is not the smartest thing you could do.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:17 PM

I wouldn't deep fry in either, but a pan fry/saute at medium heat, why not? Coconut oil can't really take high heat either, its smoke point is low due to the high levels of MCFAs.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:16 PM

Folks have no qualms about frying with lard, and that's just as PUFA laden as olive oil, if not slightly more. It just something that's been repeated so much that it's become ingrained as gospel, but it's not.

7b4641bc7c610f2944da66f79cc3378a

(298)

on May 19, 2013
at 01:47 PM

Olive oil with 10% PUFAs good for frying? How is that? Major paleoresources do not recommend heating olive oil, but use it for salad dressings only.

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3 Answers

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 19, 2013
at 12:10 PM

Olive oil is fine for frying, sort of an urban legend that you shouldn't use it.

Red Palm is more saturated than olive oil, which, in theory, increases the stability of it. I wouldn't use it for high heat frying as you'll be burning the tocotrienes (vitamin E) that are present, and that's the primary reason to consume red palm oil in my opinion.

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on May 19, 2013
at 05:26 PM

That's interesting about the vitamin E, I hadn't heard that before. I agree that olive oil is fine as long as your careful not to burn it like you said. I don't think lots of Paleo eaters are cooking with high heat anyways unless your pan searing, and that's a different story.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:16 PM

Folks have no qualms about frying with lard, and that's just as PUFA laden as olive oil, if not slightly more. It just something that's been repeated so much that it's become ingrained as gospel, but it's not.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:43 PM

It's not the fat that's the problem with EVOO, it's the phytochemicals (i.e. the green color) that ultimately burn first. I take care not to burn my oils when cooking. Red palm oil does burn easily, smoking only a few seconds after melting sometimes. Makes it a good choice for eggs, as you don't need high heat to cook them. And it can make scrambled eggs from store-bought conventional eggs as colorful those made from the best free-range eggs.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:22 PM

Since most pan frying is high heat frying, I'd always avoid EVOO. Light OO may work better for those committed to only using types of olive oil for cooking. Sometimes people are afraid of using EVOO in a non-direct heat source, which I agree is silly, but pan-frying with EVOO is not the smartest thing you could do.

7b4641bc7c610f2944da66f79cc3378a

(298)

on May 19, 2013
at 01:47 PM

Olive oil with 10% PUFAs good for frying? How is that? Major paleoresources do not recommend heating olive oil, but use it for salad dressings only.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:17 PM

I wouldn't deep fry in either, but a pan fry/saute at medium heat, why not? Coconut oil can't really take high heat either, its smoke point is low due to the high levels of MCFAs.

0
7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on May 19, 2013
at 05:23 PM

I usually go with tallow, I find I rarely burn anything when using it and I can get it locally as opposed to tropical fats that have to be shipped from a source that I know relatively little about.

By the looks of it though coconut oil would be a better option than palm oil. The only thing is coconut has funny taste that I dislike, perhaps one could use refined as I'm sure it would withstand the refining process much better than other oils and wouldn't have the flavour of virgin coconut oil. Way cheaper too.

0
8d386bf2c5ba20fcc1a2a0c805b217c9

(743)

on May 19, 2013
at 03:52 PM

Like Matt said, the saturated-fat content, as well as the vitamin-E content, make red palm oil desirable for cooking and frying.

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