1

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How to reduce omega 6 content in lard?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 01, 2010 at 9:13 PM

I'm trying to make a concerted effort to reduce my consumption of omega 6, even from animal sources.

I bought some lard which has a PUFA content of 11% and the majority of that is bound to be omega 6 given the amount of grains in standard pig feed.

Is there anyway of refining the lard at home to reduce the PUFA content?

Ed0cb30f40daff568778b776b2a5a81d

(943)

on December 25, 2012
at 06:28 AM

Do you know much that changes the omega 3 and 6, both in absolute amounts and the ratio? Can it also be done with duck fat for instance?

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on March 03, 2010
at 04:08 PM

I think it would be listed in the ingredients. They hydrogenate to make it shelf stable. That it was sold refridgerated indicates it is not shelf stable and thus not likely to have trans fat.

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on March 03, 2010
at 11:54 AM

How do you know if it has been hydrogenated? It doesn't say on the label and it was stored in the fridge.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 02, 2010
at 05:32 AM

In general, the total fat in grass fed beef is lower than in grain fed (the purpose of the grain is to increase fat). In addition, the ratio of O-3 to O-6 is higher, which means that O-6 is lower. For example, see http://www.eatwild.com/images/gr_essential_fat.gif

C8debab64e0631590cb54b7db86f08e5

(296)

on March 02, 2010
at 04:52 AM

Lard from grass fed cows does not necessarily contain less omega 6. It has more omega 3 but often the same or more omega 6. The ration of 6 to 3 is significantly improved in all events.

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5 Answers

best answer

1
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 01, 2010
at 09:22 PM

You have to remember that the 11% number is an average and yours might be more or less. I get my lard from a farmer who feeds minimal grains, so it is probably less.

I wish I could reduce the PUFA content, but unfortunately I lack a food processing lab in my kitchen.

3
6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on March 01, 2010
at 10:05 PM

Fractional crystallization? Slowly congeal lard in small temperature steps and collect the fractions that solidify first?

Or just buy tallow or butter.

1
45dca96afa2a203d48032852d9c3d729

(145)

on March 03, 2010
at 03:26 AM

To render lard:

Cut the grass-fed fat into small cubes. Put in shallow pan with a small amount of water to prevent burning until the fat starts to melt. I start my oven at 325 until there is a good amount of melted fat to cover the bottom of the pan, then turn it down to 300. Check every 30-60 minutes, stir. After an hour or so the water will have cooked out and you can start to pour off the lard as needed. I strain it through a metal strainer into glass jars and refrigerate.

As you near the end of the rendering, you get cracklins. I usually turn the oven down to 275 and let them crisp for a few more hours, stir as needed. You can make them as crunchy as you like. Add lots of salt or other seasonings. I keep mine in the freezer and reheat as needed.

The lard will be yellow until it cools down and solidifies. Keeps for months in the fridge. It is delicious.

Ed0cb30f40daff568778b776b2a5a81d

(943)

on December 25, 2012
at 06:28 AM

Do you know much that changes the omega 3 and 6, both in absolute amounts and the ratio? Can it also be done with duck fat for instance?

1
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on March 01, 2010
at 11:31 PM

There are many different kinds of lard, and processes for rendering. Be careful that if the lard is shelf-stable it has been hydrogenated and contains trans fats.

As to fractional crystallization, if you have to ask... :-) here's a few melting points of some common fats

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on March 03, 2010
at 04:08 PM

I think it would be listed in the ingredients. They hydrogenate to make it shelf stable. That it was sold refridgerated indicates it is not shelf stable and thus not likely to have trans fat.

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on March 03, 2010
at 11:54 AM

How do you know if it has been hydrogenated? It doesn't say on the label and it was stored in the fridge.

1
5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

on March 01, 2010
at 11:28 PM

You can't refine fats at home.

The only solution is to buy lard (and meat) from grass-fed animals.

C8debab64e0631590cb54b7db86f08e5

(296)

on March 02, 2010
at 04:52 AM

Lard from grass fed cows does not necessarily contain less omega 6. It has more omega 3 but often the same or more omega 6. The ration of 6 to 3 is significantly improved in all events.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 02, 2010
at 05:32 AM

In general, the total fat in grass fed beef is lower than in grain fed (the purpose of the grain is to increase fat). In addition, the ratio of O-3 to O-6 is higher, which means that O-6 is lower. For example, see http://www.eatwild.com/images/gr_essential_fat.gif

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