2

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To be Lean or Live Longer...Is that really the question?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 24, 2012 at 4:59 PM

So I have posted quite a few questions in regards to having almost insatiable hunger for fats specifically when trying to follow a ketogenic diet which has always led me to gain fat weight and then I wind up resorting to my PSMF again...and the cycle continues. Well, I think that my problem when I tried to transition was always that I started to get a little too fatty meat happy and, as a result, my protein dropped (as fattier meat as less protein per ounce) and so did my satiety. Now, I have been reading a lot of ketogenic diet information including Lyle Macdonalds and so had thought that too much protein (we're talking 125-140g for a 5'7" ideally 140-145# woman) would kick me out of ketosis and therefore keep me from becoming truly fat-adapted and able to do my more strenuous activites (surfing, scuba, biking, heavy weight training etc). And then I was reading all this information on how lower protein is more ideal for a longer life and how the benefits of CR might actually be PR and so on. So I dropped my protein again and stuck exactly to ketogenic ratios (5% C, 70% fat, 25% P) with protein being around 90g. Well, like clockwork, appetite went wonky and fat cravings came back full force.

Then I stumbled upon this page of PHD describing the effect of protein in the diet and found it spot on in terms of my experience with higher protein consumption: http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2011/01/protein-satiety-and-body-composition/.

So the question- does it seem entirely logical that my drop in proteins led to my increased fat cravings or should I consider something else as well? Also, is it worth worrying about longevity if protein restriction is just going to led to a less ideal (and fatter) quality of life or is there a way to have both? My goals, to be specific, are to be lean- i.e.

I'd like to see my actual abs not the reflection of my 6 pack in the fat that covers them) and be able to be the very active, outdoorsy woman I am. Please no comments on PSMF...this has already been addressed and I truly do not feel that that is the larger issue at play in my weight maintenance issues. I mention it because of it's focus on protein for lean mass sparing the the fact that it clearly shows the appetitie supressing and satiety inducing effects of higher protein.

Eead82aa93bbcdada0bcd817d0952e58

(214)

on May 24, 2012
at 05:39 PM

interesting, thanks! I'm starting to think that, like everything else, protein requirements are highly individual and what migh tbe high for some is ideal for others.

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3 Answers

2
7cf9f5b08a41ecf2a2d2bc0b31ea6fa0

on May 24, 2012
at 05:19 PM

Marks Sisson says that lean muscle is the key to longevity and good health so maybe you don't have to choose

1
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on May 24, 2012
at 05:29 PM

This article from Paul Jaminet is worth a read: http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2011/10/perspectives-on-low-carb-i-dr-kurt-harris/

Under the "Food Reward and Obesity" section he discusses Protein and satiety in terms of how, under experiemental conditions, a rats appetite (and total calorie intake) is finely tuned to make sure that (s)he gets exactly enough protein to meet structural needs and (if necessary) fuel gluconeogenesis. If you feed them a food that is low in protein but high in carbs, they will continue eating until they've met their protein requiement, even though that means taking on lots of extra carbohydrate calories.

I'm sure that the same thing applies to a low-protein/high-fat diet.

Eead82aa93bbcdada0bcd817d0952e58

(214)

on May 24, 2012
at 05:39 PM

interesting, thanks! I'm starting to think that, like everything else, protein requirements are highly individual and what migh tbe high for some is ideal for others.

0
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on May 24, 2012
at 05:14 PM

Protein restriction makes me hungry too. I think the strategy is based on a rather myopic view of biology. It makes sense we'd have seasons when we'd have a lot of growth (and activation of MTOR), and then times when we didn't.

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