4

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Should people with leaky gut eat a generally lower protein diet?

Commented on January 21, 2015
Created January 27, 2013 at 7:10 PM

I have experimented with various macronutrient ratios and my skin is virtually flawless when I am eating mostly carbs and fat, and a very low amount of protein, generally about 3-4 ounces a day. I have tried this with grass-fed beef and grain-fed beef but the results are the same. The more protein I consume the worse my skin looks. I know there are a lot of people who could eat all the protein in the world and not notice a difference in skin quality, but how about those with damaged guts? Is it crazy to think that people that have damaged their guts might be reacting to otherwise benign proteins from chicken, beef, and fish? Does anyone with an any type of autoimmune disease react negatively to a high protein diet? Do we fix this problem by eating mostly carbs and fat until the gut is healed?

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on January 29, 2013
at 12:46 AM

@dragonfly, all 100% grass fed from US Wellness Meats.

757f1ff864ea8f669d58e83cc1f1881b

(309)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:45 PM

*meats *concentrated *very clear skin Mmmm... Sorry... Having some brainfog right now :)

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on January 28, 2013
at 12:46 AM

Was it 100% grass fed beef? If it was "finished" with corn, you may be reacting to that.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on January 27, 2013
at 09:01 PM

I would be wary about lowering your protein intake. I would make it my concern to make sure I'm eating the most easily digestible protein available. Have you tried taking a Betain Hcl/Pepsin supplement?

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on January 27, 2013
at 07:53 PM

I actually eat most of my meat slow cooked, usually steamed. I have never tried marinating meat, but I know that I generally look better on plain chicken breast. But it makes my diet very bland and tasteless.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on January 27, 2013
at 07:46 PM

Have you tried switching your protein to protein that is easier digested? Have you tried marinating your meat in ACV and kefir? Have you cut out egg whites, but left egg yolks in? Have you tried boiling all of your meats instead of frying or grilling?

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on January 27, 2013
at 07:32 PM

I have nothing against protein. It is great for satiety and body comp. I just notice that my skin doesn't look so good when eating a lot of it.

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on January 27, 2013
at 07:31 PM

Well no. Not if you are not eating mostly wheat as your carbs or seed oils as your fat.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on January 27, 2013
at 07:19 PM

Mostly carbs and fat? Isn't that, like, SAD?

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4 Answers

3
757f1ff864ea8f669d58e83cc1f1881b

(309)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:43 PM

I actually react to high protein meata as well. I do have Leaky Gut also, but when eating concetrated protein (chicken/pork) I get extreme brainfog, cortisol increase and bloodsugar drops. A couple of years ago this never happened. Have very skin though and eat pork twice a week.

757f1ff864ea8f669d58e83cc1f1881b

(309)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:45 PM

*meats *concentrated *very clear skin Mmmm... Sorry... Having some brainfog right now :)

1
75d65450b6ff0be7b969fb321f1200ac

(2506)

on January 28, 2013
at 10:19 PM

No. I have an autoimmune disease (psoriasis) and I have no problem with meat of any sort. AFAIK, protein fragments slipping through a leaky gut only cause problems if there is molecular mimicry with human proteins, thus causing the immune system to develop antibodies to attack these "invaders". This is true with casein, a protein in dairy; I developed a severe sensitivity to dairy past age 50 most likely in part to having a leaky gut. Other proteins can be involved:

http://www.glutenfreesociety.org/gluten-free-society-blog/lectins-gluten-rheumatoid-arthritis-molecular-mimicry/

However I don't believe molecular mimicry has anything to do with animal meat. Having said this, I do know of people with psoriasis who experience a worsening condition when eating meat. I suspect there are complex reasons involved versus it being a molecular mimicry/leaky gut issue.

_Lazza

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:52 PM

Whether or not leaky gut plays a part, I don't know. Low, but adequate, protein is something that is probably a good idea though. It's quite likely that the calorie restriction/longevity correlation due more to protein restriction/moderation rather than energy restriction.

0
913cbd0c382211790d07dc02c892448d

on January 21, 2015
at 06:24 AM

I'm not sure, but I hope so! I'm actually not Paleo, I'm Vegan and had been gluten intolerant for a while before developing other food intolerances, and making the connection to having leaky gut. The thing about a vegan diet most people don't realize is, if you do it "right", you actually end up consuming A LOT of protein. I was having about a cup each of beans/lentils/legumes, seeds, and nuts every day, and mainly getting the symptoms after eating beans/lentils. So I just started my own vegan version of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet + FODMAPS diet, meaning I cut all those things out and am only eating certain veggies and fruits and coconut for fat. I hope it works! 

Cb42861b341ad0bd979e7c75a0eb8a52

on January 21, 2015
at 09:46 AM

A cup of beans or lentils is roughly 4g of protein. A cup of nuts and seeds up with to 20g but around 800 calories, neither a good primary protein sources.

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