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Protein required for athletic gains

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 11, 2012 at 11:59 PM

Hi, Just wondering what peoples thoughts are regarding the amount (in grams)of protein which is required to gain/at least maintain muscle mass while hypocaloric. 1g per lbs of lean body mass? Less? More?

Cheers

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:49 AM

Im not too concerned with the exact macro's I just like to keep a ballpark figure of what they are to make sure I'm hitting my goals. As a former binge eater unweighed/unmeasured doesn't quite work for me as my hunger signals/hormones still aren't working in the way they should.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on February 12, 2012
at 02:32 AM

I'm with Daniel on the plain amount of oprotein. I'd mention though that I've dipped slightly hypo at times to lean out but always maintain BCAA supplementation. I go with 10g for the first 100 lbs of bodyweight, then 10g for every 50 lbs of bodyweight after that. For me I'm about 170 so I do about 20 grams of supplemental BCAA daily.

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on February 12, 2012
at 01:19 AM

1g/lb/day is generally fine unless cals are very low. In case you missed this recent study: http://www.ergo-log.com/eatingmoreprotein.html

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on February 12, 2012
at 12:52 AM

trying to drop some weight that is all. Going hypocaloric to try and jump into fat stores as energy.

22fcea5ec4415ff2238c663324aca40f

(556)

on February 12, 2012
at 12:08 AM

Why be hypo-caloric? Your body is not a bomb calorimeter, that's not what it's about. Don't limit yourself. Base your meals around a protein, a fat, then whatever your veggies you choose and you will be fine.

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7 Answers

best answer

1
095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:11 PM

Most people go overboard on protein. You want to be in a fat burning metabolism, don't overdo the protein. Remember that the body does prefer to use the easiest fuel source, glucose, for energy. Excess protein not used for muscle synthesis and repair is converted to glucose in the body. This keeps your body in a sugar burning metabolism and not a fat burning one. Then when it's looking for more glucose it finds the easiest source, the most assimilable protein there is for the human body...human muscle tissue. It's called catabolism, and yes, overdoing it on the protein can do this to you. Seems counter-intuitive but this is how it works.

I usually recommend protein be about 35% of the calories one consumes. Zone takes it up to 40 but I think this is pushing it just a little, ok for most, but for some of us, it may work against us. 40% is the top amount I'd go with.

1
A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

on February 12, 2012
at 02:38 AM

I am currently eating about 1g per pound of lean mass - sometimes a little more. I also supplement with 10g of BCAAs on lifting days, prior to my workout. I'm getting leaner, losing weight, and getting stronger.

0
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on February 26, 2012
at 09:11 PM

Calories in excess, creates a anobolic condition. super class Weight lifters and offensive lineman know this, neither really need to use the pill becasue they can eat HUGE amounts of food, esp carbs and lots of protein to gain mass and strength- if this is your goal- EAT up. ball players and sprinters can't eat 20, 000 caloreis to gain strength so science delvelop a pill for them thast doies the same thing without the huge meals and snacks. Which is why I tell folks, "Don't eat like an athlete unless you are an athlete."

btw- experiement and see what works, every good trainer will follow this practice.

0
E0b25881c8a34bcacf02f6f2d8bbf991

on February 12, 2012
at 06:24 PM

Overall, however, I think his experiences are consistent with our framework for understanding nutritional needs. Those who are content with maintaining an ordinary person’s muscle mass can get by with relatively low protein intakes of 0.8 g/kg/day or less. But muscle-building athletes need high protein intakes, around 1.9 g/kg/day, to maximize the rate of muscle gain. If they eat low-carb, they may need even more protein. Such high protein intakes are likely to exceed the threshold of toxicity. (http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=2712)

0
3db96673061a57412677e39c4bce94c8

(58)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:29 AM

I don't mean to offend, but why count calories OR protein? Eat a clean paleo diet that has plenty of meat, eat plenty of it, and exercise a LOT. Also, get lots of sleep. My experience is that when I'm healthy overall and exercising a lot AND getting plenty to eat, that is when I lose the fat. I think that is just my body playing it safe and refusing to lose fat when it perceives food insecurity. ... I also tend to lose fat in the summer and gain fat in the winter.

Measuring and counting food seem to me to be very counterintuitive, and no fun at all. I guarantee you our paleolithic ancestors didn't count grams or calories. It is especially hard when I cook food with a lot of ingredients and an unknown amount of water and oil. Some of the water boils off or some of the oil drains off, and then my calculations are out the window. wtf. If the food is good, eat it.

Also, remember the modern lifestyle where exercising typically translates to an hour at most per day doesn't hold a candle to what our bodies were designed to do, which is exercise almost all day and sit almost not at all. To get fit, lose fat, get lean, you really have to exercise a lot.

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:49 AM

Im not too concerned with the exact macro's I just like to keep a ballpark figure of what they are to make sure I'm hitting my goals. As a former binge eater unweighed/unmeasured doesn't quite work for me as my hunger signals/hormones still aren't working in the way they should.

0
9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on February 12, 2012
at 01:05 AM

I've gone as low as 1g per 1 lbs of LBM on a hypocaloric diet without losing strength or muscle mass. Going so low on protein results in more hunger, though. YMMV.

0
Ee70ee808f748374744404a00e1c22ed

(1163)

on February 12, 2012
at 12:50 AM

You don't need a ton of protein to preserve muscle, or even for gaining mass. 90-120 grams per day should be fine. If you're interested in the mechanisms behind protein intake and synthesis, I'd suggest reading How Much Protein? by Brad Pilon.

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