3

votes

Protein and Intermittent fasting?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 12, 2012 at 6:20 PM

I've heard that adults should eat at least 30g of protein at each of 3 meals for optimal muscle maintenance. The theory goes, that your body can't store protein, so if you go too long with out it, your body will recycle muscle

For those of you who intermittently fast, how do you follow this recommendation? I know many IFers only eat 2 meals a day. Do you just pay no mind to this "constant need for protein"?

I ask, because i have found myself to be spontaneously skipping meals, or eating very sparingly for breakfast because i just don't feel hungry.

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 13, 2012
at 02:55 PM

I'm also working on an article reviewing the trainer that I am using as well as the workout template. Look for it soon . . .

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 13, 2012
at 02:54 PM

Carl, I've gone through several cycles of different exercise protocols. When I started it was heavy/compound movement total body workouts three times a week. I then went into a pretty standard split with legs with weights once a week and some HIIT(sprinting) two others. Currently, I'm doing a whole body suspension workout three times a week with some HIIT and cycling thrown in. I'm in the beginning phases of this with my goal being to increase core strength through some of the gymnastic moves that can be done with suspension training.

599feb9ad716266e8eb5030cd82d5dcd

(229)

on September 13, 2012
at 10:30 AM

I have been on a ketogenic diet for a while now, and just cannot seem to gain strength. I don't want to come off it because of the fantastic mental effects, and the long term health benefits on my cells and mitochondria. Still, I would like to be able to get stronger. I have been restricting protein to stay in keto, but maybe I need to change that. I'm 5'6 and 130 pounds, and get about 80-85% of calories from fat each day. What is your workout routine like, do you do a split or full body routine and how often works for you exactly?

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:53 PM

Yes. Pure fat does not disrupt this, but carbohydrate and/or protein would.

Ce2968ab71119c736ba9d83841c5718a

on September 12, 2012
at 06:48 PM

are you implying that a constant stream of protein would disrupt that process?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:23 PM

strategic use of casein containing dairy products such as cottage cheese and greek yogurt can circumvent this problem, as casein does not spike insulin levels and keeps a steady supply of amino acids going to the blood over a 5-8 hour time frame due to it's coagulation and slow protein breakdown.

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3 Answers

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3
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 12, 2012
at 07:13 PM

I threw everything I thought I knew about protein instake out the window. Things such as X# of grams per pound of bodyweight, only absorb this much per session, etc. I follow the LeanGains approach daily and often throw in a 24 hour fast once every couple of weeks or so. I am currently 5'10 193 LBS. I lift heavy (fasted), do HIIT several times a week and throw in some light cardio on rest days (it's relaxing and meditative for me). At first I was really scared to lower protein intake because of a muscle loss fear and what I've lived by for so long. If I didn't get over 200g of protein per day I was completely stressed out. Now, I typically consume 100-130g protein per day split between two meals. Fat intake is probably 60-70% of my total caloric intake in the form of grass-fed butter, coconut oil, and grass-fed animal fat(organ meat, pemmican, etc.). My personal results have been increased strength and muscle mass, fat loss, and less stress about food consumption. Here is an article that has some before and after pictures to alleviate fears of not putting on muscle eating this way. If you have more in-depth questions, I'll be more than happy to go into more detail.

Remember everyone is different, the only way to know what works for YOU is experiment! The joy of self-discovery is a cool thing, don't be afraid to try it!

-Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

599feb9ad716266e8eb5030cd82d5dcd

(229)

on September 13, 2012
at 10:30 AM

I have been on a ketogenic diet for a while now, and just cannot seem to gain strength. I don't want to come off it because of the fantastic mental effects, and the long term health benefits on my cells and mitochondria. Still, I would like to be able to get stronger. I have been restricting protein to stay in keto, but maybe I need to change that. I'm 5'6 and 130 pounds, and get about 80-85% of calories from fat each day. What is your workout routine like, do you do a split or full body routine and how often works for you exactly?

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 13, 2012
at 02:55 PM

I'm also working on an article reviewing the trainer that I am using as well as the workout template. Look for it soon . . .

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 13, 2012
at 02:54 PM

Carl, I've gone through several cycles of different exercise protocols. When I started it was heavy/compound movement total body workouts three times a week. I then went into a pretty standard split with legs with weights once a week and some HIIT(sprinting) two others. Currently, I'm doing a whole body suspension workout three times a week with some HIIT and cycling thrown in. I'm in the beginning phases of this with my goal being to increase core strength through some of the gymnastic moves that can be done with suspension training.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:49 PM

Rule of thumb is 1-1.5g protein per pound lean body mass for maintenance. Your body does not care whether this comes all in one meal or in two or three or seventeen.

That being said, there appears to be an upper limit of what you can absorb at a time which is regulated by the number of transporters you have (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amino_acid_transporter) which is highly individualistic but appears to be in the 5-15g of protein per hour range. Food typically takes 3-4 hours to digest protein you can absorb 15-60g of protein at a time with most people in the 30-45g range.

However, protein, and especially protein consumed with fat will slow down digestion via a cholecystokinin antagonist which may enable someone to absorb more protein.

I am always amazed when I learn how many different ways "paleo" style foods (i.e. fat) actually improve how the body functions with certain nutrients.

1
6d64cd6dc98d6ab763bd03678a317964

(2177)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:46 PM

Look into autophagy. Recycling of protein is exactly what you want.

Ce2968ab71119c736ba9d83841c5718a

on September 12, 2012
at 06:48 PM

are you implying that a constant stream of protein would disrupt that process?

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:53 PM

Yes. Pure fat does not disrupt this, but carbohydrate and/or protein would.

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