3

votes

Non-paleo: Protein content of green beans vs. dried beans?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 11, 2010 at 11:16 PM

In a similar vein of the question: http://paleohacks.com/questions/308/lectin-content-of-green-beans-vs-dried-beans -

I have a friend who can't eat meat or seafood + has a thyroid condition so they avoid iodine. Trying to determine the best protein source for them is tricky, so we have to determine which legumes might be least harmful, and has enough protein.

I'd like to know the protein contents of various bean types, primarily comparing green beans to traditional dried beans.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 04:40 AM

I have given a pretty detailled answer below. I was diagnosed just recently with hyperthyroidism.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 04:32 AM

From reading online I _think_ maybe, that the minimum requirement of the thyroid is 60mcg/day. My doctor has advised me, to ingest _some_, but simply to not go over the RDA which is 150mcg/day. To me, this basically means I think choosing grassfed or free-range where I can and not worrying about meat (except mince), and not eating eggs, dairy or seafood. I will need to source some freshwater fish though!

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 03:19 AM

I know, my thyroid test just came back hyperthyroid, and it was hugely stimulated by the 400-500mcgs I was eating per day in the from 5 daily eggs, cheddar, cranberry juice and fish. I am just hoping it settles and am avoiding iodine for now. Its not something I have researched as much as id like yet, but its a definate certainty that excess iodine is bad for hyperthyroid.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 03:17 AM

^ Thats wrong. Excess iodine, whether its a whole food or not, can stimulate hyperthyroidism. In fact switching from a very low iodine diet to a high one, can cause temporary hyperthyroidism. The recommended intake is 150mcgs. If one is controlling hyperhthyroidism, one may wish to remain below this for about 2 weeks. and then perhaps hover around that mark, but going above that can be detrimental in some, especially those with hyperthyroidism.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 03:02 AM

Oh, and grassfed meat do get salt-licks to supplement their minerals, but this is far less likely to be excessive amounts compared to feedlot. The low iodine diet says re meats "Fresh cuts from the butcher excluding broth injected poultry and pork and minced beef". It sets a limit of 6 oz, but id suggest that if you avoid feedlot meat, you could eat much more than 6oz per meal very safely.

3eafb88d6a6d762fcfa8ed4eb0576260

(642)

on June 02, 2010
at 07:58 PM

But all kinds of paleo foods contain anti-nutrients: cruciferous vegetables, nuts, seeds, sweet potatoes, raw egg whites, etc. This is probably not the best means of demarcation.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on June 02, 2010
at 03:53 AM

Perfect! Great!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 01, 2010
at 06:04 PM

Then I would suggest the most hypoallergenic one- brown rice protein probably fits the bill. He might want to avoid legumes in general...or anything that has a thyroid effect at all.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on June 01, 2010
at 05:38 PM

Egg whites cause autoimmune problems Eggs in general have lots of iodine - both situations make them bad for people with hyperthyroid problems, which my friend has.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on June 01, 2010
at 05:35 PM

Egg whites can cause autoimmune problems, which is bad for people who already have autoimmune issues, thyroid problems. I tried asked for best protein source when meat and seafood is out, I asked that exact question actually. But people chose to debate about the possibility of that type of situation, rather than answer the question.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 01, 2010
at 01:22 PM

Beautiful, thanks

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 01, 2010
at 01:18 PM

Can you edit the title to say: [Non-Paleo]

D738a5b2a67f3c36518a2ac9f32d27af

(821)

on June 01, 2010
at 12:09 AM

I believe protein combining http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein_combining has been largely debunked. When I was a vegetarian, the best dietary advice I read was to simply eat a variety of whole foods to ensure getting enough nutrients and not get too worried about the minutiae of it all.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on May 31, 2010
at 08:45 PM

Above slightly rude, I apologize, but please take this to a non paleo forum.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on May 31, 2010
at 08:45 PM

Wrong forum... This is paleohacks not vegetarianhacks legumes aren't paleo or primal or caveman or evolutionary

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on May 29, 2010
at 04:11 AM

The Original Poster could've got a lot more positive and informative replies asking more along the lines of "need to sniff out the best protein source considering that meat and seafood is out....." I'd certainly believe there are humans that can't eat meat/seafood (PKU, etc...) and would like to know a protein source to keep such a person in good health. Perhaps egg whites? Perhaps clean whey sources dunno. May have to go sub-optimal and non- Paleo, but what would be the best alternate protein source when meat/seafood is out?

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on May 15, 2010
at 01:00 AM

I don't see how discouraging inquisitive minds increases the knowledge of anyone. But sure, feel free to keep asking questions like vision tests, because that has a lot to do with food, right? Are you serious? I shouldn't ask about real food options because they don't fit into your narrow idea of what Paleo is or is not? I ask these questions because I have a friend who can't eat meat or seafood + has a thyroid condition so they avoid iodine. Trying to determine the best protein source for them is tricky, so we have to determine which legumes might be least harmful, and has enough protein.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 13, 2010
at 10:28 PM

And I'm simply making sure you're not throwing off newbies, who come to a **paleo** site, looking for **paleo** questions, and find people talking about **non-paleo** foods. It's paradoxical. Maybe try asking on a vegetarian board or something

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on May 13, 2010
at 10:16 PM

I didn't ask if they were paleo, I was asking what their protein values were.

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8 Answers

best answer

4
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 01, 2010
at 01:17 PM

To answer this question perhaps we should go back and ask ourselves why beans aren't in the traditional paleo diet? It's mostly justified because of their high anti-nutrient content.

In that content, the least harmful protein sources are probably fermented traditional legume products. Fermentation reduces antinutrients and produces probiotics. The negative is that many are high in salt and my own experience was that some upset my stomach. Some possible options include miso, natto, and tempeh. It's frickin hilarious that Wolf is OK with green beans, but not with these much less toxic products. Just because you can pick it in your garden doesn't make it paleo.

Brown rice protein is also considered to be fairly neutral and when I was vegan I had decent results with home-ground hemp powder, though since the intact seeds are illegal in the US, that might not be an option.

Whey and egg whites are the other obvious choices if he can digest them.

Basically if we could create a rank of protein choices normal beans would probably be on the bottom.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 01, 2010
at 06:04 PM

Then I would suggest the most hypoallergenic one- brown rice protein probably fits the bill. He might want to avoid legumes in general...or anything that has a thyroid effect at all.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on June 01, 2010
at 05:38 PM

Egg whites cause autoimmune problems Eggs in general have lots of iodine - both situations make them bad for people with hyperthyroid problems, which my friend has.

2
D8691a1cee39ea420a36b163d4a4042b

(404)

on May 29, 2010
at 03:27 AM

How are green beans not paleo?

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 13, 2010
at 08:45 PM

Before anyone gets the wrong idea - I would like to say that Robb Wolfe is not the complete and utter authority on what is and is not paleo. Legumes still are not paleo, even if our modern farming and breeding techniques make these things edible.

I'm just here to say: I don't have an answer, and that's because it doesn't matter. Don't eat either of them

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 13, 2010
at 10:28 PM

And I'm simply making sure you're not throwing off newbies, who come to a **paleo** site, looking for **paleo** questions, and find people talking about **non-paleo** foods. It's paradoxical. Maybe try asking on a vegetarian board or something

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on May 13, 2010
at 10:16 PM

I didn't ask if they were paleo, I was asking what their protein values were.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on May 15, 2010
at 01:00 AM

I don't see how discouraging inquisitive minds increases the knowledge of anyone. But sure, feel free to keep asking questions like vision tests, because that has a lot to do with food, right? Are you serious? I shouldn't ask about real food options because they don't fit into your narrow idea of what Paleo is or is not? I ask these questions because I have a friend who can't eat meat or seafood + has a thyroid condition so they avoid iodine. Trying to determine the best protein source for them is tricky, so we have to determine which legumes might be least harmful, and has enough protein.

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on May 29, 2010
at 04:11 AM

The Original Poster could've got a lot more positive and informative replies asking more along the lines of "need to sniff out the best protein source considering that meat and seafood is out....." I'd certainly believe there are humans that can't eat meat/seafood (PKU, etc...) and would like to know a protein source to keep such a person in good health. Perhaps egg whites? Perhaps clean whey sources dunno. May have to go sub-optimal and non- Paleo, but what would be the best alternate protein source when meat/seafood is out?

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on June 01, 2010
at 05:35 PM

Egg whites can cause autoimmune problems, which is bad for people who already have autoimmune issues, thyroid problems. I tried asked for best protein source when meat and seafood is out, I asked that exact question actually. But people chose to debate about the possibility of that type of situation, rather than answer the question.

1
Fcba747ff931251895bd863ef469b5c8

on May 31, 2010
at 04:04 PM

Green beans still contain harmful lectins; that's what makes them non-paleo.

3eafb88d6a6d762fcfa8ed4eb0576260

(642)

on June 02, 2010
at 07:58 PM

But all kinds of paleo foods contain anti-nutrients: cruciferous vegetables, nuts, seeds, sweet potatoes, raw egg whites, etc. This is probably not the best means of demarcation.

0
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 01:21 AM

Avoiding excess iodine makes sense (like eggs, fish and iodised salt, dairy) for a hyperthyroid, but you do need still need some I beleive.

Fresh water fish has less that seafood. If you can find some freshwater farmed salmon at some point, to eat occasionally this may be ideal because omega-3 is useful to support the thyroid, and though it still has some iodine, its much less that sea fish.

Being that they cant have dairy, eggs, or seafood on a lower iodine diet, I would suggest that grassfed land mammals is the most ideal for of protein and fat, being lower in iodine, and containing balanced fats and whole proteins.

And while we are on that topic, why cant they have meat? I understand avoiding cured meat, perhaps even avoid feedlot meat (often they put iodine in the feed), but grassfed cuts from the butcher?

Even with feedlot meat it tends to be lower than seafood:

In mcg/kg: Beef mean iodine levels in mcg/kg: Muscle (173), Liver (70), Kidney (61). Poultry - Breast/Muscle (56 – 1248)

(Tending towards to lower end usually, but dependant on iodine in the feed)

Versus mean iodine in mcg/kg: Cod (1100), Haddock (2500), Atlantic Salmon (760), Rainbow Trout (130)

As you can see, meat, even feedlot, is generally lower than seafood, depending on how over the top the farmers have gone with the iodine in the feed. And the more freshwater the fish is, the lower it is too. So freshwater fish and grassfed meats are fine...

Ergo best protein source: 100% Grassfed beef, mutton, buffalo and lamb (not minced as that can very rarely be contaimanated with thyroid gland), and occasional 100% freshwater farmed salmon or freshwater trout (wild salmon tends to roam into the sea and that increase its iodine), and perhaps some egg whites if its not an autoimmune issue (although probably smart to avoid, seeing as it usually is autoimmune)

TLDR? - Answer: All 100% fresh grassfed meat cuts from the butcher, except minced meats should be all good. Even occasional freshwater fish, and poultry/ham.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 03:02 AM

Oh, and grassfed meat do get salt-licks to supplement their minerals, but this is far less likely to be excessive amounts compared to feedlot. The low iodine diet says re meats "Fresh cuts from the butcher excluding broth injected poultry and pork and minced beef". It sets a limit of 6 oz, but id suggest that if you avoid feedlot meat, you could eat much more than 6oz per meal very safely.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 04:32 AM

From reading online I _think_ maybe, that the minimum requirement of the thyroid is 60mcg/day. My doctor has advised me, to ingest _some_, but simply to not go over the RDA which is 150mcg/day. To me, this basically means I think choosing grassfed or free-range where I can and not worrying about meat (except mince), and not eating eggs, dairy or seafood. I will need to source some freshwater fish though!

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 26, 2010
at 03:33 AM

You can easily Google 'protein content + beans' and come up with lots of information on the subject but this question triggered a memory.

As I recall from reading "Diet for a Small Planet" years ago the best vegetarian protein is obtained by combining proteins from, say rice and beans to make a complete protein. You might want to look further into that subject.

D738a5b2a67f3c36518a2ac9f32d27af

(821)

on June 01, 2010
at 12:09 AM

I believe protein combining http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein_combining has been largely debunked. When I was a vegetarian, the best dietary advice I read was to simply eat a variety of whole foods to ensure getting enough nutrients and not get too worried about the minutiae of it all.

-1
7e7b8eaedf35c291718d245210549856

(-2)

on August 06, 2012
at 05:04 PM

You should never avoid iodine in your diet if you can get it from the food you eat and not just salt. Iodine aids the work of the thyroid whether it is over or under-active. The UL on iodine for an adult is 1100mcg which is a lot more than the RDA so there is a pretty large safe range for overconsumption.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 03:19 AM

I know, my thyroid test just came back hyperthyroid, and it was hugely stimulated by the 400-500mcgs I was eating per day in the from 5 daily eggs, cheddar, cranberry juice and fish. I am just hoping it settles and am avoiding iodine for now. Its not something I have researched as much as id like yet, but its a definate certainty that excess iodine is bad for hyperthyroid.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 03:17 AM

^ Thats wrong. Excess iodine, whether its a whole food or not, can stimulate hyperthyroidism. In fact switching from a very low iodine diet to a high one, can cause temporary hyperthyroidism. The recommended intake is 150mcgs. If one is controlling hyperhthyroidism, one may wish to remain below this for about 2 weeks. and then perhaps hover around that mark, but going above that can be detrimental in some, especially those with hyperthyroidism.

-1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on May 31, 2010
at 04:26 PM

try nutritiondata.com

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