3

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If you had to choose omega 3 eggs vs cage free...

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 17, 2011 at 1:02 PM

Sadly I am limited to my choices of the eggs I can get. I can get cage free vegatarian fed eggs or I can get omega 3 fortefied, soy protein fed eggs (note the lack of free range on this one). Both without antibiotics, of the two which would you opt for and is there any difference between brown eggs and white eggs? And can we skip the jokes in relation egg color please. I mean 3 jokes popped into my head immediately so lets just skip to the end. :)

A4f9da7d094aa72508853588682b65f7

(268)

on May 18, 2011
at 03:46 AM

Perhaps I could swap with a chicken keeping friend.

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9

(439)

on May 18, 2011
at 03:08 AM

All the people I know who have chickens for eggs eat the hens eventually. I even know a rabbit breeder who will eat her rabbits if they don't sell... maybe I know too many strange people...

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on May 17, 2011
at 03:04 PM

A hen's natural diet isn't awfully high in exogenous lectins, but being 100% grain-fed increases the amount of lectins in the hen's body significantly. I had read somewhere at some point that this increases plant-lectin concentration in the eggs, but I just tried to find some studies that confirm it, and I have to admit, I wasn't able to do so on my first attempt. It may be that I'm just totally wrong about the increased lectin concentration in the egg... but Jans' experience above isn't unusual. It seems that something immunogenic reaches the egg from commercial feed.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 17, 2011
at 02:42 PM

I believe lectins are limited to egg whites, avenin something. Becker can you expand the reasons for increase of lectins due to grain feed ? I haven't heard that one.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on May 17, 2011
at 02:28 PM

Hahaha, Kent. My town totally allows it, but my inlaws live with us and my MIL almost fainted when I mentioned it. We have the room too!

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on May 17, 2011
at 02:13 PM

My city seems to permit this, but I don't think my wife would ever let my have a chicken "tractor" on our tiny patch of 10x20 rear lawn :(

91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

(2081)

on May 17, 2011
at 01:44 PM

I did not know that about the lectins in eggs, but it answers a LOT of questions - my eldest son has terrible gastric reactions to feedlot eggs but not those I feed him, which are from pastured hens.

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5 Answers

2
35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9

on May 17, 2011
at 01:42 PM

I'm mostly just lurking here because I'm still learning the Paleo stuff, but the egg color actually correlates to the skin around the chicken's "ear." So, if you are ever shopping for chickens??? and want white eggs, get chickens with white ears. I know ear isn't the right term, but if you look for ears, you'll find what I'm talking about. http://www.mypetchicken.com/about-chickens/chicken-pictures/Earlobe-Color-Indicates-Egg-Color-X23.aspx

have you checked Craigslist for a local backyard chicken keeper? Even here in a town where we have ordinances against it, there are a few people who are sneaky and keep them, since you don't need a rooster to get eggs.

If hubby ever lets me, I'm going to get my own bunch of chickens.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on May 17, 2011
at 02:13 PM

My city seems to permit this, but I don't think my wife would ever let my have a chicken "tractor" on our tiny patch of 10x20 rear lawn :(

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on May 17, 2011
at 02:28 PM

Hahaha, Kent. My town totally allows it, but my inlaws live with us and my MIL almost fainted when I mentioned it. We have the room too!

2
Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on May 17, 2011
at 01:13 PM

Egg color is just a result of breeding. Consumers like white eggs for the same unknowable reason they like sweet ketchup, buttery nut butters, and pizza on a bagel. As far as I know, it doesn't have any effect on the nutrients apart from the shell.

"Cage-free" means just about nothing. If I remember correctly, it means that there simply needs to be 3'x3' access to the sun (or something similarly paltry), but not necessarily that any chicken ever goes out into it. That variable probably may as well be constant between your two options.

The grain-feed has two deleterious effects on the eggs: (1) it vaporizes the omega-3 content and (2) it adds excessive lectins to the egg, often the component of the egg people are allergic to -- and it all came from a feedlot diet, awesome! It seems like you can't avoid the lectin issue in either case (even in truly pastured chickens, there is a little lectin in the eggs to do some natural components of their diet). I don't know what soy proteins they're being fed or how they isolated them, but if it has soy in it, you can bet it's a lose-lose situation. That leaves just the omega-3 as the primary consideration.

I'd go for the omega-3 fortified eggs, even though flax-derived ALA conversion in the human body is only about 10-15% efficient.

91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

(2081)

on May 17, 2011
at 01:44 PM

I did not know that about the lectins in eggs, but it answers a LOT of questions - my eldest son has terrible gastric reactions to feedlot eggs but not those I feed him, which are from pastured hens.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 17, 2011
at 02:42 PM

I believe lectins are limited to egg whites, avenin something. Becker can you expand the reasons for increase of lectins due to grain feed ? I haven't heard that one.

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on May 17, 2011
at 03:04 PM

A hen's natural diet isn't awfully high in exogenous lectins, but being 100% grain-fed increases the amount of lectins in the hen's body significantly. I had read somewhere at some point that this increases plant-lectin concentration in the eggs, but I just tried to find some studies that confirm it, and I have to admit, I wasn't able to do so on my first attempt. It may be that I'm just totally wrong about the increased lectin concentration in the egg... but Jans' experience above isn't unusual. It seems that something immunogenic reaches the egg from commercial feed.

0
A4f9da7d094aa72508853588682b65f7

(268)

on May 17, 2011
at 08:47 PM

For those who keep chooks...what do you do with the old girls? After about 3 years they stop laying very many eggs, but they have become pets in this time (I've nothing against eating chickens but I object to eating my friends, particularly friends who have given me a daily egg for 3 years....)

I can see that as we have a small garden we could only have 3 hens, and in 3 years time we would not have any eggs....

A4f9da7d094aa72508853588682b65f7

(268)

on May 18, 2011
at 03:46 AM

Perhaps I could swap with a chicken keeping friend.

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9

(439)

on May 18, 2011
at 03:08 AM

All the people I know who have chickens for eggs eat the hens eventually. I even know a rabbit breeder who will eat her rabbits if they don't sell... maybe I know too many strange people...

0
60199d3a580a4e17969059609e48e678

on May 17, 2011
at 04:56 PM

eggland's best has cage free and omega-3 eggs. but I would probably go with a chicken coup if I had the means to.

-3
796d2266c54ffe57bf43a00b4315b747

on May 17, 2011
at 01:37 PM

get some hens and a rooster.

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