1

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i'm eating WAY too much- how much protein does it take until it becomes glucose?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 20, 2012 at 3:27 AM

I find that I'm eating WAY too much of everything, including protein... like i read what people say they have per day, and its like....thats what i have per meal. im ravenous, ill eat a pound of ground beef, 2 9oz chicken breasts, and half pound of veggies per meal, and I'm still hungry 2 hours later.

what the hell is going on?

I've always been a massive over-eater, yet I've always been slender (6'3 185-195 pounds, gaining weight is a struggle) i used to eat a 6,000 calorie pizza for lunch at work everyday for a year, plus a gallon of soda, plus id run out to the gas station to get like 20 candy bars, and then id go to taco bell every night and get another 2,500 calories, yet i never gained a pound until i started lifting.

i was hoping my hunger would subside on paleo, I'm on day 12 now. I've ordered a bunch of food from "pale on the go" , arrived today, supposed to last 2 weeks, I've gotten through 1/4 already and I'm about to go make more

I'm really worried that if i keep eating all this protein, ill start making glucose and ruin the whole thing.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 27, 2012
at 03:43 PM

My neck hurts .

Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on October 27, 2012
at 05:56 AM

You should look at the video. you are sitting sideways.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 20, 2012
at 06:05 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Amino_acid_catabolism_revised.png You can end up with glucose, but only if your body is making glucose actively. Otherwise, it should simply be shunted towards fat production.

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on October 20, 2012
at 04:31 PM

From my understanding (first year of medical biochemistry), excess protein is broken into the amino acids and then used for production of muscle or enzymes within the body. I'm still learning all the mechanism, but would you point me to what pathway converts "protein to glucose (outside of gluconeogenesis) and/or and/or fat as well as ammonia/urea that is excreted"? I'll eventually get to those pathways I'm sure, but I'd like to understand your thought process.

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on October 20, 2012
at 04:28 PM

Good point, I didn't necessarily mean 'storage' of protein like you'd have storage of sugar (glucagon) but I was trying to make the jargon more simplified/uncomplicated since I don't think the point of the question was biochemistry.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 20, 2012
at 01:23 PM

Not sure I agree with your biochemistry above. We don't have protein stores, other than functional muscle. So any excess protein consumed is broken down into small molecules that can be converted to glucose and/or fat as well as ammonia/urea that is excreted.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on October 20, 2012
at 05:57 AM

Also how old are you? I had a bottomless pit for a tummy until I was about 22. That was when I finally stopped growing.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on October 20, 2012
at 05:55 AM

What's your goal? It doesn't sound like you are looking for fat or weight loss so I'm not sure why your appetite is an issue. Is it just about the cost for convenience of all that food? Not downing you - just trying to understand what it is you're looking for so that I can better answer :)

Medium avatar

(2417)

on October 20, 2012
at 05:14 AM

Intermittent fasting helps too. Eat, stop, eat. Snacking fuels the desire.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 20, 2012
at 04:35 AM

BTW chicken breast is crap....replace that with a rack of ribs. Heck lets get right to it, you need more fatty meats.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 20, 2012
at 04:28 AM

The "satiety switch" is functioning just fine. Fella has a very high metabolism.

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7 Answers

2
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 20, 2012
at 04:25 AM

Check this out http://www.ketotic.org/2012/08/if-you-eat-excess-protein-does-it-turn.html

I have seen those with high metabolic status eat over 4000 calories a day without gorging on protein or carbs...here is one such example if you need some ideas http://eatingacademy.com/nutrition/what-i-actually-eat

Your a big guy....so don't be afraid to eat like one. That guy I linked to is smaller than you (and likely older)

1
76e8e511a75a00d4d8a5d0efdfc3698b

on October 20, 2012
at 04:12 PM

Sounds like you're eating substantially less. What you described in your "Paleo" meal is about 1/3rd to 1/4th of what you described your prior eating to be. Seems pretty reasonable.

AF

1
B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on October 20, 2012
at 04:20 AM

Protein does not turn into glucose*. Protein is a macro-molecule composed of amino acids. Think of it like a necklace composed of many beads. The necklace is the protein molecule and each bead represents an amino acid. *However, if the amino acids are then stored and you are not regularly ingesting carb sources of glucose, your body will go through gluconeogenesis where it will convert fatty acids or amino acids into glucose.

But I digress, I don't think you want to know the biochemistry. Your issue seems to be with satiety. Your body is probably going through some serious re-adjustment (it seems like you are drastically changing your diet? correct me if I'm wrong). High carb (read: high sugar) diets mess with your insulin production and regulation. Your body gets use to high blood glucose levels, then pumps out a lot of insulin to put the glucose into your cells, and, therefore, decreasing blood glucose levels. You've now taken away the high carbs and have confused your body that had grown accustomed to running with high glucose and high insulin.

Additionally, your were consuming a substantial amount of calories, that is now gone. For now, I'd suggest that you increase you fat intake (grass-fed butter, tallow, coconut oil, bone broth, etc) and perhaps include a little more carb-y vegetable matter in the form of tubers (e.g. sweet potatoes) and more vegetables (e.g. onions, leeks, carrots) until you get the hang of eating paleo. While some people advocate really low-carb for fat-loss or insulin-reset. In your case, I think your physiology needs to get use to eating nutritionally dense food first and then you can focus on other goals.

If increasing your fat intake doesn't help with satiety, I'd suggest seeing a naturopath or paleo-leaning nutritionist of some kind. There might be a build up of gut flora or a 'leaky gut' that is inhibiting you from absorbing enough nutrition from your food. This, in turn, would lead you to eat and eat and eat to get the nutrients your body needs.

I hope that helps. :)

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on October 20, 2012
at 04:28 PM

Good point, I didn't necessarily mean 'storage' of protein like you'd have storage of sugar (glucagon) but I was trying to make the jargon more simplified/uncomplicated since I don't think the point of the question was biochemistry.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 20, 2012
at 01:23 PM

Not sure I agree with your biochemistry above. We don't have protein stores, other than functional muscle. So any excess protein consumed is broken down into small molecules that can be converted to glucose and/or fat as well as ammonia/urea that is excreted.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 20, 2012
at 06:05 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Amino_acid_catabolism_revised.png You can end up with glucose, but only if your body is making glucose actively. Otherwise, it should simply be shunted towards fat production.

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on October 20, 2012
at 04:31 PM

From my understanding (first year of medical biochemistry), excess protein is broken into the amino acids and then used for production of muscle or enzymes within the body. I'm still learning all the mechanism, but would you point me to what pathway converts "protein to glucose (outside of gluconeogenesis) and/or and/or fat as well as ammonia/urea that is excreted"? I'll eventually get to those pathways I'm sure, but I'd like to understand your thought process.

0
Eb717b3230de17a7c870a0292696e6bc

on October 27, 2012
at 04:11 AM

Check out this video, I made it to help some people out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5F9rLxPyyI&feature=plcp

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 27, 2012
at 03:43 PM

My neck hurts .

Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on October 27, 2012
at 05:56 AM

You should look at the video. you are sitting sideways.

0
Medium avatar

on October 20, 2012
at 05:12 AM

I'm tall and thin too, with a voracious appetite and no satiety all my life, and never being able to gain muscle.

5 months of zero carb paleo eating tons of beef and mutton, three meals a day, zero snacking, curbed it immensely. You have to adapt, and master your cravings. Keto helps give you the right system to do it.

I'm on leangains now. Carb refeeds on workout days. 2 meals a day. Low calorie. I finally can manage and master my slavery to food.

I think we, some people, simply have less efficient digestion, for any number of reasons, so we are always unsatisfied.

Medium avatar

(2417)

on October 20, 2012
at 05:14 AM

Intermittent fasting helps too. Eat, stop, eat. Snacking fuels the desire.

0
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on October 20, 2012
at 04:24 AM

Have you had a complete work-up? I mean endocrine, digestive, all of it? That's where I would start. Plus, and I don't want to be gross, but how about deworming yourself? Talk to your doctor first.

Weight is not necessarily a good indicator of health, especially in your situation, so I'd have everything checked out.

0
6d64cd6dc98d6ab763bd03678a317964

(2177)

on October 20, 2012
at 03:51 AM

You could try eating more long chain fatty acids.

RESULTS—Intraduodenal fat perfusion significantly (p<0.05) reduced calorie intake. Inhibition of fat hydrolysis abolished this effect. Only long chain fatty acids significantly (p<0.05) decreased calorie intake, whereas medium chain fatty acids were ineffective. Infusion of loxiglumide abolished the effect of long chain fatty acids.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1727908/

If you already get a lot then it seems like a satiety switch in your brain may be broken. Might require more unorthodox treatments.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 20, 2012
at 04:28 AM

The "satiety switch" is functioning just fine. Fella has a very high metabolism.

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