2

votes

Does too much protein cause an insulinogenic response?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 05, 2012 at 12:26 AM

I think my question is pretty straightforward. I'm mostly interested in how protein in meat/fish will cause an increase in insulin. And if a person eats a consistently high protein diet, would they (or should they) have any reason to fear?

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on April 06, 2012
at 01:36 PM

Bill, you're a douche. I find the question perfectly fine.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 05, 2012
at 05:11 PM

Thanks for making me read that again!

4dda29dc4fbada49bd68a6fbd76bf40c

(268)

on April 05, 2012
at 08:42 AM

I'd imagine you have a reason for asking - what exact issue are you experiencing that is making you question your protein intake? :)

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on April 05, 2012
at 02:34 AM

Is it just me or do you show up on PaleoHacks to ask questions just to get a rise out of people? Hitting 'hot buttons' about supposed 'Insulogenic Protein' which is just plain ridiculous because as stated below, protein ALSO causes a glucogon release (unlike sugar). And what would they have to 'fear'?

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on April 05, 2012
at 02:08 AM

Protein turning to fat??? You have a higher chance of hitting the Powerball.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 05, 2012
at 02:03 AM

@Ambimorph, The better point to make is that glucose is not the sole product of protein metabolism. If glucose needs are not met, yes, glucose is produced (from metabolites of proteins). Otherwise the metabolites get used directly or converted into and stored as fat.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on April 05, 2012
at 01:34 AM

That's not how gluconeogenesis works. It's a pervasive myth, though. See here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/58525/what-happens-to-excess-protein

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3 Answers

8
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on April 05, 2012
at 01:29 AM

There may be some confusion about meat being insulinogenic. The thing is, the amount of glucagon that is also released makes up for it, so it's hardly comparable to something like rice, which is also highly insulinogenic, but without the same glucagon response.

Petro Dobromylskyj discusses this in more detail.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 05, 2012
at 05:11 PM

Thanks for making me read that again!

0
E76608e1044792ae176a768d950f1847

on April 05, 2012
at 01:26 AM

I know my weight loss stalled out bad by eating almost all protein. I had to add back more veggies and reduce meat portion size. All anecdotal but worked for me

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on April 05, 2012
at 12:58 AM

Edited - apparently I was wrong in my response.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on April 05, 2012
at 01:34 AM

That's not how gluconeogenesis works. It's a pervasive myth, though. See here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/58525/what-happens-to-excess-protein

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 05, 2012
at 02:03 AM

@Ambimorph, The better point to make is that glucose is not the sole product of protein metabolism. If glucose needs are not met, yes, glucose is produced (from metabolites of proteins). Otherwise the metabolites get used directly or converted into and stored as fat.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on April 05, 2012
at 02:08 AM

Protein turning to fat??? You have a higher chance of hitting the Powerball.

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