1

votes

cutting protein costs and relying protein powder

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 22, 2011 at 2:04 PM

I'm already maintaining a low BMI/BF% and from reading Stephan's latest posts on carbohydrates, I've decided a low-fat diet might not be so bad, and to try it. I have no issues with carbohydrates e.g. wheat and not diabetic.

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2011/05/healthy-skeptic-podcast-and-reader.html

I want to cut down on protein costs, so it seems that if I buy a low-fat protein powder in bulk, e.g. Isopure, then I could save on the cost per gram protein. I'm not allergic to dairy, and whey protein seems to have some beneficial qualities.

What might be the long-term consequences of replacing the usual protein with whey/casein protein powder instead? How would you know if you're deficient in something, what health markers or lab results would you look at? Do you think a protein powder-based diet is unsustainable?

01/30/2012

I've maintained my diet and marginally reduced my weight since I asked this. It was a nice experiment. Works for me but not everyone. Interesting nobody could answer my second question.

4bd3ea60eb43692dcf474c05b499b0d4

(124)

on April 03, 2012
at 08:45 PM

you shouldnt use protein powder since it wasnt used paleolithic age

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 30, 2012
at 09:14 AM

I used protein powders daily before with good results on fat loss and maintaining muscle mass while on a body recomposition. I've now been completely powder-free since beginning of January. I didn't see any differences in results or improvement in overall health. I'll add powders back to see if that has an impact.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on January 30, 2012
at 06:37 AM

"zero satiety"? Maybe for you, but not me. I've maintained or reduced my weight fine. Have you tried to read anything besides the product label? Glycomacropeptide found in whey protein is a powerful stimulator of CCK, which is an appetite suppressing hormone.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on January 30, 2012
at 06:37 AM

"zero satiety"? Maybe for you, but not me. I've maintained or reduced my weight fine. Have you tried read anything besides the product label? Glycomacropeptide found in whey protein is a powerful stimulator of CCK, which is an appetite suppressing hormone.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on January 30, 2012
at 06:32 AM

Since I asked this question, I have maintained my diet, and experience has proven your assertion here to be FALSE here, sorry.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on January 30, 2012
at 06:31 AM

Thanks for your opinion, but you are incorrect on facts. Whey protein has Glycine, Proline, Alanine which you say it lacks. Since I put this question up, I have maintained this diet and reduced my weight. It has proven to be more economical not in just dollars but also time.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on August 20, 2011
at 02:25 PM

The ingredients are not great and it has fructose. Ingredients: Whey Protein Blend [Micro-Filtered Whey Protein Concentrate (providing beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, Immunoglobulins and Serum Albumin), Ion-Exchanged Whey Protein Isolate (providing beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, Immunoglobulins and Glycomacro Peptides) and Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Whey Protein Concentrate], **Fructose**, Natural Flavor, Xanthan Gum, Free-Form L-Glutamine and Stevia rebaudiana Herbal Extract. Contains milk and **soy derivatives**.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 24, 2011
at 01:26 AM

look a little harder...you need only look at the link in my question to find it.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 23, 2011
at 12:42 AM

overall, good answer though and worthy of this up-vote.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 23, 2011
at 12:32 AM

The potential appetite and insulinogenic effects have always concerned me, however, from taking into account the actual results of examples such as the potato diet, and Stephan's recent writings, i.e. "I do not think that post-meal insulin spikes contribute to obesity, and they may even oppose it. ", I now have doubts about how important an effect the perceived insulin response is going to have in a lean, healthy individual. There's theory and then then there's reality when you actually apply it.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 23, 2011
at 12:31 AM

Lab tests I would run anyway on my follow-ups - I have health insurance to where it's worth doing. Good point on the beef liver. If make protein powder the main protein source, then I'd definitely think about "supplementing" with beef liver. Beef liver costs $2.50/lb., so that's $0.625/ 25 g protein. The cost from 10 lb. bag of whey isolate would be $80/162 = 0.494 / 25 g protein. But we can argue there are certainly more expensive sources of protein powder and cheaper sources of lean protein e.g. chicken breast. I guess it's a trade-off between optimal health and cost.

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on May 22, 2011
at 03:58 PM

well said Simibee

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 22, 2011
at 03:46 PM

I agree. PWO i actually do both the whey AND my real food meal. 12 oz starchy tuber, 12 oz chicken breast, one serving whey.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 22, 2011
at 03:45 PM

paleo and whey powder are not mutually exclusive. Rather, they have nothing to do with eachother. eat strict paleo, done. Good food, good nutrition, good energy, etc. But if you are striving for a certain protein-intake it becomes difficult after a certain point. In those cases for instance simply supplement with whey powder.

1d9af5db8833413037be3ac48964714f

(3789)

on May 22, 2011
at 03:19 PM

Good point. Answer: if you want to do paleo, don't consume edible food-like substances such as protein powder. Eat real food instead.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 22, 2011
at 02:55 PM

but understood how this answer could be considered an answer to this question?

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7 Answers

best answer

4
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 22, 2011
at 03:43 PM

Whey protein powder offers zero satiety. I use it, I think its effective for sneaking in more protein throughout the day but it offers no feeling like food.

Right on every whey bottle/canister I've ever found it says "Do not use a sole source of nutrition."

I would say only use it in the way its been designed to be used: as a supplement to your food intake.

here is what I use jsyk: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000QSNYGI

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on January 30, 2012
at 06:37 AM

"zero satiety"? Maybe for you, but not me. I've maintained or reduced my weight fine. Have you tried to read anything besides the product label? Glycomacropeptide found in whey protein is a powerful stimulator of CCK, which is an appetite suppressing hormone.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on January 30, 2012
at 06:37 AM

"zero satiety"? Maybe for you, but not me. I've maintained or reduced my weight fine. Have you tried read anything besides the product label? Glycomacropeptide found in whey protein is a powerful stimulator of CCK, which is an appetite suppressing hormone.

11
Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on May 22, 2011
at 02:58 PM

In my opinion, protein powder is a false economy.

There are a myriad of micronutrients found in meat (copper, B12, choline, zinc, selenium, niacin to list just a few), especially organ meat (which tends to be extremely cheap) that are missing from protein powder. Protein powder with a very expensive multivitamin would in many cases be a poor substitute for a very cheap biweekly meal of beef liver.

The balance of amino acids in protein powder is poor. Protein powder lacks the (so-called inessential) amino acids like glycine, proline, alanine e.t.c. which are consumed in balance on a whole foods diet.

Equally, I would caution against consuming sweetened protein powder on a daily basis. Even "natural" and "safe" sweeteners like stevia still exercise a potent effect on our brains/appetites, simply by virtue of their sweetness.

As an occasional on the go fallback, protein powder is just fine, but if you're looking for optimal health/wellbeing then I wouldn't advise relying on it as a staple.

Also, paying for multiple lab tests to determine the possible damage caused by your austerity diet won't exactly be cheap either. Think longer term.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 23, 2011
at 12:32 AM

The potential appetite and insulinogenic effects have always concerned me, however, from taking into account the actual results of examples such as the potato diet, and Stephan's recent writings, i.e. "I do not think that post-meal insulin spikes contribute to obesity, and they may even oppose it. ", I now have doubts about how important an effect the perceived insulin response is going to have in a lean, healthy individual. There's theory and then then there's reality when you actually apply it.

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on May 22, 2011
at 03:58 PM

well said Simibee

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 23, 2011
at 12:42 AM

overall, good answer though and worthy of this up-vote.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 23, 2011
at 12:31 AM

Lab tests I would run anyway on my follow-ups - I have health insurance to where it's worth doing. Good point on the beef liver. If make protein powder the main protein source, then I'd definitely think about "supplementing" with beef liver. Beef liver costs $2.50/lb., so that's $0.625/ 25 g protein. The cost from 10 lb. bag of whey isolate would be $80/162 = 0.494 / 25 g protein. But we can argue there are certainly more expensive sources of protein powder and cheaper sources of lean protein e.g. chicken breast. I guess it's a trade-off between optimal health and cost.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on January 30, 2012
at 06:31 AM

Thanks for your opinion, but you are incorrect on facts. Whey protein has Glycine, Proline, Alanine which you say it lacks. Since I put this question up, I have maintained this diet and reduced my weight. It has proven to be more economical not in just dollars but also time.

6
1d9af5db8833413037be3ac48964714f

on May 22, 2011
at 02:43 PM

I've never understood how protein powder could be considered to have anything to do with paleo.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 22, 2011
at 03:45 PM

paleo and whey powder are not mutually exclusive. Rather, they have nothing to do with eachother. eat strict paleo, done. Good food, good nutrition, good energy, etc. But if you are striving for a certain protein-intake it becomes difficult after a certain point. In those cases for instance simply supplement with whey powder.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 22, 2011
at 02:55 PM

but understood how this answer could be considered an answer to this question?

1d9af5db8833413037be3ac48964714f

(3789)

on May 22, 2011
at 03:19 PM

Good point. Answer: if you want to do paleo, don't consume edible food-like substances such as protein powder. Eat real food instead.

3
C1c86f42410cd4788bd9c5cf801dcd8f

(2246)

on May 22, 2011
at 02:12 PM

You will end up eating more protein then you currently do now.

Protein powder does not fill you up or make you feel full, even when you eat the same amount of food. When I used to follow the zone, (years ago) if I made a shake for breakfast I was starving 2 hours later, if I ate real food (paleo style) I would be fine at least until 12 if not longer. (Eating breakfast at 6-7am)

Honestly to use protein powder as a main staple in ones diet, seems very unsustainable just because of the health issues with constantly spiking your insulin levels and Whey Protein will do that a lot.

In a post workout setting if you have the LBM you want I am for protein shake, other than that you should really stick with eating real food, as spiking your insulin levels is just asking for health issues down the road.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 22, 2011
at 03:46 PM

I agree. PWO i actually do both the whey AND my real food meal. 12 oz starchy tuber, 12 oz chicken breast, one serving whey.

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on January 30, 2012
at 06:32 AM

Since I asked this question, I have maintained my diet, and experience has proven your assertion here to be FALSE here, sorry.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 02, 2011
at 01:47 AM

agree most protien powders have far too many additive and flavour enhancers and how much of it is actually absorbed - you lose the synergy of other nutrients by using it.Better to get it from whole food or if you have to supplement go to the highest natural source with no anti nutrients. The best whole source satiating, amino balanced in my opinion by far is sacha inchi powder. it's got no additives - is 63 % highly digestible - so you absorb 99% of what you eat - and goes suprisingly well with cacao powder and coconut sugar(low gi sugar packed with vitamins and minerals - particially good if youre also working out) and your choice of milk. This makes a great homemade 100% natural chocolate drink that is energy boosting, full of feel good tryptophan and all the other aminos, vitamins and minerals and polyphenols - high in potassium and magnesium - eliminating the need for sports type drinks and tastes great. http://www.matakanasuperfoods.com/ms/products/sacha-inchi-protein-powder.html

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on May 23, 2011
at 06:43 AM

If you do use Whey it should be sparingly. Perhaps after working out.

I have yet to find an unsweetened one... Have not looked that hard...

74c2a166b7f6f13fb39af9f0f439cb38

on May 24, 2011
at 01:26 AM

look a little harder...you need only look at the link in my question to find it.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on August 20, 2011
at 02:25 PM

The ingredients are not great and it has fructose. Ingredients: Whey Protein Blend [Micro-Filtered Whey Protein Concentrate (providing beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, Immunoglobulins and Serum Albumin), Ion-Exchanged Whey Protein Isolate (providing beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, Immunoglobulins and Glycomacro Peptides) and Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Whey Protein Concentrate], **Fructose**, Natural Flavor, Xanthan Gum, Free-Form L-Glutamine and Stevia rebaudiana Herbal Extract. Contains milk and **soy derivatives**.

0
072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on May 23, 2011
at 01:48 AM

Interesting that this question is targeted to a group that I understand to generally follow the Paleo diet as you are asking very non-Paleo questions. That said, I have about 4 pounds of "high quality" whey isolate in my cupboard that you can have. I don't ever plan to touch the stuff again.

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