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Does hemp protein powder have too much fiber to add to a pre-meal (stage 1) workout (lasting more than 90 minutes)?

Answered on October 03, 2013
Created October 02, 2013 at 8:50 AM

I've been reading Cordain's Paleo for Athletes. He recommends eating a high-carb meal 2 to 3 hours prior to a long (90+ minute) workout. That meal should contain some protein, however. He suggests adding some protein powder to a high carb meal. I can't tolerate whey and am looking for a substitute. I read about hemp protein, but I know it's high in fiber. (He cautions against eating too much fiber pre-workout.) Any suggestions?

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on October 03, 2013
at 02:42 PM

P.S. While I have not personally read Cordain's books, it appears from what I've read of his book(s), they seem to advocate some flawed theories and ways of eating -- often not very clean from a truly natural perspective. And, he seems to be a human being among other human beings. Despite having published some of the earliest "Paleo" books, his thoughts do not sound anywhere near 80% correct, though they are potentially interesting to investigate.

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on October 03, 2013
at 02:25 PM

This is fascinating to me, and I'm curious to see how it goes; please report back! Ah, and best of luck!

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on October 02, 2013
at 06:14 PM

... I have mixed my own sugar-drink for the few long-distance cycling events I've done over the last few years; this was for rides that were all day (~6-8 hours). I use coconut sugar, but it's still just sugar (albeit with more trace minerals and vitamins).

Other things that have worked for me include very ripe plantains cooked & cooled (basically a gel!), as well as fully caramelized sweet potatoes, cooled. They are not as quick as pure glucose, but quick enough - they worked for me.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on October 02, 2013
at 06:12 PM

Depending on the type of training you are doing, you are almost certainly going to do better if you eat something small, and carbohydrate dense, starting somewhere between 1 and 1.5 hours after intense exercise begins.

I think it's important to train with the food your going to supply when you do the event. Sure, this can be gel, but gel is disgusting. I'm more of the type that will supplement long duration exercise (>1.5hrs) with sugary fruits. ...

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on October 02, 2013
at 05:00 PM

What is your goal? Weightloss? "Athlete" and "fasted state" don't often go together. ;-) Like anyone, an athletic person may use fasting and exercise in a cutting/weightloss period, but for training, not so much.

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5 Answers

0
9d6a3118e13cf56ccaa46f9323fb09dc

on October 03, 2013
at 03:35 PM

@greymouser -- Not that it matters, but I've heard/watched Cordain talk about his work. There's something about his demeanor that rubs me wrong. So as I'm reading his book, I keep picturing this sort of egotistical guy and it makes me less eager to embrace the book. Robb Wolf is the same way...

0
9d6a3118e13cf56ccaa46f9323fb09dc

on October 02, 2013
at 11:22 PM

@greymouser This is just what I needed to "hear." Thank you. I appreciate your taking the time share it. Your approach sits much better with me than gels and powders. I've got a 2 hour training run coming up on Saturday. I'm going to experiment a little bit with your ideas and see my body responds.

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on October 03, 2013
at 02:42 PM

P.S. While I have not personally read Cordain's books, it appears from what I've read of his book(s), they seem to advocate some flawed theories and ways of eating -- often not very clean from a truly natural perspective. And, he seems to be a human being among other human beings. Despite having published some of the earliest "Paleo" books, his thoughts do not sound anywhere near 80% correct, though they are potentially interesting to investigate.

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on October 03, 2013
at 02:25 PM

This is fascinating to me, and I'm curious to see how it goes; please report back! Ah, and best of luck!

0
9d6a3118e13cf56ccaa46f9323fb09dc

on October 02, 2013
at 05:13 PM

@greymouser, thank you. The book does seem really strange. I really don't want to consume sports gels/drinks and start eating protein powder. But I'm really at a loss. I've only been following a paleo diet for about 6 months now. But EVERY SINGLE health concern I had prior to the diet has completely disappeared for me. I feel better than I have felt in a long, long time.

I'm training for my fifth marathon -- but my first following a paleo diet. Quite frankly, I'm confused about how/when I should be eating now that my long training runs are getting longer. I used to be a gatorade/gel consumer. I don't want to have anything to do with either one right now. But how will that affect my training and the marathon itself? As much as I understand the paleo diet as a day-in-day-out basis, I don't understand how to modify it as an athlete. Maybe I'm overt thinking it. But won't I need so high glycemic foods before and during my runs/races? And if so, what should they be? Thanks for any suggestions you can give.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on October 02, 2013
at 06:14 PM

... I have mixed my own sugar-drink for the few long-distance cycling events I've done over the last few years; this was for rides that were all day (~6-8 hours). I use coconut sugar, but it's still just sugar (albeit with more trace minerals and vitamins).

Other things that have worked for me include very ripe plantains cooked & cooled (basically a gel!), as well as fully caramelized sweet potatoes, cooled. They are not as quick as pure glucose, but quick enough - they worked for me.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on October 02, 2013
at 06:12 PM

Depending on the type of training you are doing, you are almost certainly going to do better if you eat something small, and carbohydrate dense, starting somewhere between 1 and 1.5 hours after intense exercise begins.

I think it's important to train with the food your going to supply when you do the event. Sure, this can be gel, but gel is disgusting. I'm more of the type that will supplement long duration exercise (>1.5hrs) with sugary fruits. ...

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on October 02, 2013
at 04:56 PM

I've been doing my limited exercise & weight lift program on a fasted state. I get far better results than I used to when eating first. Therefor I'm not a big fan of his idea, although he is the godfather.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on October 02, 2013
at 05:00 PM

What is your goal? Weightloss? "Athlete" and "fasted state" don't often go together. ;-) Like anyone, an athletic person may use fasting and exercise in a cutting/weightloss period, but for training, not so much.

0
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on October 02, 2013
at 04:39 PM

Disclaimer: I'm a very active fellow, I've read the first edition of that book, but I'm not an athlete like an olympic sprinter. In general, I'm weary of that book. It basically assuages the athlete-paleo reader's fear that not all processed food will kill you, and can even be helpful (fine), but makes some of the darndest suggestions.

If you're going to the do the highly-processed-food-product-meal-replacement-shake thing, I would suggest sticking to beef or egg protein, or optionally rice protein (if you do PHD or not strict paleo). These should be available at your locale health-food / vitamin shop store, or amazon. Hemp protein just isn't that interesting protein-wise, and honestly has much to much fiber to eat in quantity without discomfort - 12g of fiber (!!!!!!) per 11g of protein.

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