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Using probiotic pills as starters for homemade fermented foods

Commented on November 09, 2015
Created February 25, 2013 at 4:23 AM

I'm looking to make some homemade fermented foods to get the benefits of the probiotics they produce. However, I was wondering if it would be possible to expand the range of beneficial bugs that grow in it.

For instance, say I made some sauerkraut. Could I break open a cap of S. Boulardii and Align's B. Infantis and expect them to thrive alongside the cabbage's existing bacteria?

Or would they just die off, make for something toxic or give the kraut an awful taste/texture?

Caa04664c04cf8c6eea4715f99a0d7e7

(40)

on February 27, 2013
at 10:11 PM

Wish I knew what it was. I've read that there is a certain stage of the fermentation to best introduce other strains, but everything I've read thus far has been vague.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on February 25, 2013
at 02:00 PM

It works, but not that well.

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5 Answers

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0
Caa04664c04cf8c6eea4715f99a0d7e7

on July 06, 2013
at 08:56 PM

I've now tried it twice with homemade fermented red cabbage (kraut). Worked great.

Halfway through packing the cabbage into the glass jar I was fermenting it with, I opened an Align probiotic into it and then cut open a Dr Ohhira's probiotic pill and dropped that in. Packed it the rest of the way and put on a perfect pickler. Left it in the dark for 3 weeks.

I've had live kraut before (purchased at Whole Foods) but I didn't get anywhere near the digestive benefit that I did with this stuff. I eat a fork full nearly every day and my IBS is now gone.

To top it off, just using one pill means I can stretch out my "specialty" probiotic purchases over the span of a year or more and cabbage is WAY cheaper than buying more Align or Ohhira's.

2
8f2d9842fdfec224a425c0f77c4ee34d

(1241)

on February 25, 2013
at 06:14 PM

There's really no point in doing it. Fermented foods already contain thousands of different strands of bacteria, so adding a couple's really not doing much.

1
4335b8ac34c8ef3b91c5409ded7435f0

on November 07, 2015
at 09:30 AM

Well, highly regarded Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride (GAPS Diet) recommends popping a capsule (no pills with binders etc.) to go with from the beginning of the fermentation. Don't know what type of sciencey stuff she's seen/read/done on the subject, but as far as I'm concerned, if there are anecdotal benefits in her clinical setting, I think it's probably a good thing to do.

Like Paleotonic states, it's probably a viable way of getting more bang out of strong, high quality probiotics. Out of the natural bugs already present in the veggies and the ones you add, the ones surviving and making it to your gut would be the strongest of the bunch, and those are probably the ones you want anyway.

The more the merrier, especially when it comes to gut bugs, right?

1
7b4010246a21a9eeb4c49a1f6244cd1d

(65)

on February 25, 2013
at 10:01 PM

I think I recall reading that wild fermented cabbage contains around 12 strains of bacteria but it depends upon many variables.

I'm interested in using strains to culture veggies due to the potential of adding additional beneficial strains as well as increasing the quantity of probiotics.

I just came across an interview of Chris Masterjohn(see link below) by Dr. Mercola. Mercola mentioned to Masterjohn that his team developed a vegetable starter than provides the equivalent of 100 capsules(...or bottles? I dont recall exactly) of probiotics. In addition to increased quantity, a therapeudic does of vitamin k2 was also generated. Sounds like he hasn't released the culture yet for sale.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_2prVhp5cU

Caa04664c04cf8c6eea4715f99a0d7e7

(40)

on February 27, 2013
at 10:11 PM

Wish I knew what it was. I've read that there is a certain stage of the fermentation to best introduce other strains, but everything I've read thus far has been vague.

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 25, 2013
at 05:59 PM

If it isn't broken, why fix it?

People around the globe have been happily consuming pickles and sauerkraut for over 5,000 years for a reason.

When I see an ad "New improved taste" all I want to say - can I have an old traditional one? Can you "improve" tabooleh? Yes, but it is not going to be a tabooleh! Stick with the old tried and true recipe.

By the way, for centuries all Eastern Europeans have been adding a few flakes of shredded carrots to their sauerkraut.

If you want to do it as a science experiment - go right ahead. You might be on to something and - who knows - your kraut might become a multi-million dollar business some day.

But I won't buy it. I prefer the old traditional taste.

:)

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on November 09, 2015
at 10:19 AM

Agree. Why change what is already tried, tested and true? By all means, make a new and different probiotic veg tho. And use both?

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