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Probiotics in homemade coconut yoghurt

Commented on December 04, 2013
Created December 04, 2013 at 9:36 PM

Hi,

I just made some coconut yoghurt using coconut cream (with no additives) a bit of honey and a few probiotic capsules. It turned out really well, and I wondered if anyone on here has any knowledge about what happens to the probiotics. I'm assuming since it got tangy, that the probiotics were multiplying. If I could, I'd like to use it instead of taking capsules as they are so expensive.

I'd like to know if possible, is there any way to figure out how much they are multiplying?

And does the coconut environment allow all the strains to multiply at a similar rate, or is it likely that some strains would prefer the environment and multiply faster?

Medium avatar

on December 04, 2013
at 10:34 PM

Ginger, cinnamon, cardamom etc etc Just experiment. Grapefruit has antibacterial properties, I believe, so that'd be another one. Acidic fruits and so on.

Who knows what the effects will be(there have been no studies on something as esoteric as this) but the diversity could only be beneficial unless you have some sort of odd pathology.

5766d5b19bbc2e82d8161a266e1ac018

(30)

on December 04, 2013
at 10:31 PM

Thanks! I do water kefir, dairy kefir, kombucha and kraut too, I just wanted to get a bit more variety in there.

"Consider using other antifungal/antibacterial products in your yogurt to help various strains gain more ground."

What products would you suggest?

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Medium avatar

on December 04, 2013
at 10:26 PM

It will vary according to light, heat, quality of the food source, how often it moved around.

If you're looking for the best probiotic for your buck go with kefir. Unlike yogurt it has the capacity to colonize the gut. If you're not allergic to casein/lactose intolerant consider using milk instead of coconut cream.

Raw honey will change the composition more towards a yeast heavy product compared to bacteria but that can be beneficial. Consider using other antifungal/antibacterial products in your yogurt to help various strains gain more ground.

5766d5b19bbc2e82d8161a266e1ac018

(30)

on December 04, 2013
at 10:31 PM

Thanks! I do water kefir, dairy kefir, kombucha and kraut too, I just wanted to get a bit more variety in there.

"Consider using other antifungal/antibacterial products in your yogurt to help various strains gain more ground."

What products would you suggest?

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