2

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Would paleolithic man kip his pull-ups?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 10, 2011 at 3:26 PM

PRIMAL KIP

In a properly performed paleolithic kipping pull-up, after locking out over the spear, the caveman pushes back from the spear into an arc that loads the forward push of the chest through the arms prior to the following rep. This is a smooth, controlled movement; by no means is it jarring or ballistic unless done improperly such as flailing legs. There is continuous tension throughout the descent, and the force is fluidly transitioned between horizontal and vertical planes preventing unnecessary flapping of the loin-cloth. The loading of the shoulders is neither abrupt nor directed in a way that subjects the shoulder joint to anything it shouldn???t be more than capable of withstanding such as a heavy woman or deer carcass. -- Grok Everett

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on November 13, 2011
at 10:10 PM

I wonder though perhaps the Paleo man did train to get stronger and faster for the hunt and life in general. Maybe looking at if there is indication of "fitness" training in recent hunter gather tribes, and looking at the history and practice if any.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:48 AM

Depends how paleo you wanna go, bro. We vegans are the OG paleos from 10 million years ago and routinely swing from branches.

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10 Answers

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7
Medium avatar

on November 10, 2011
at 03:52 PM

Paleo Man never "exercised." Had no need to. Yours is a fun question that points to a major disjuncture between his world and ours. Can you even imagine our ancestors living the life they lived, looking at each other after a full day, and saying, "Hey, are you up for a 15-mile training run prior to dinner?"

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on November 13, 2011
at 10:10 PM

I wonder though perhaps the Paleo man did train to get stronger and faster for the hunt and life in general. Maybe looking at if there is indication of "fitness" training in recent hunter gather tribes, and looking at the history and practice if any.

5
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on November 10, 2011
at 04:42 PM

It's all about energy efficiency. And depending on the context.

Think MovNat. Look at all the videos from MovNat.

Kipping vs strict pullup is a false dichotomy. So much more ways to get yourself on a tree branche.

4
Medium avatar

on November 10, 2011
at 03:43 PM

lol. I thought about this too when I started doing crossfit (back before it was the hot new thing, and I got some pretty insane looks at the gym doing kipping pull ups and handstand pushups) Here was my thinking- in order to make a movement applicable, you do it in a way that engages the entire body so that that movement can be applied to a variety of situations and scenarios. If you do a movement to isolate a particular muscle group, you strengthen the muscle group, but the movement may or may not be able to be applied when it is needed. Kipping pullups vs traditional pullups are like front squats vs a leg press machine. Both built stregnth, but one is more useful, practical, applicable than the other

4
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 10, 2011
at 03:40 PM

Probably he would have. If it was part of a daily activity like climbing a mountain he wouldn't have worried about how many strict pullups he can do during crossfit.

3
Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 10, 2011
at 04:39 PM

I went to an indoor rock climbing gym for several years and had the opportunity to climb outside on a handful of occasions.

Climbing a large, imposing rock seems to be the best analog to a Pleistocene/Paleolithic "pull-up" (although I suppose tree climbing would work as well.)

When facing the option of either falling down a rock face, or making it to the top, I most definitely did anything and everything that I could. If "kipping" was an option, I would have taken it gladly. As it was, I performed a move that could more accurately be described as "the beached whale".

This involves applying as much bodily surface area as possible to the rock and, inch by inch, shimmying until enough body mass was over the lip to permit a muscle-up-esque top-out of the boulder.

1
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2011
at 12:53 AM

Hold on just a second here.

Everybody loves pullups, which is all well and good. But I'm having a hard time imagining paleo man regularly pulling himself up to something. Am I missing something? Survival is partly about risk avoidance, and humans are not the best tree-climbers or cliff-hangers-on'ers.

Picking stuff up and carrying it seems very natural. So deadlifts, farmer's walk, odd lifts in the fashion of old-timey strongmen. Making stuff is natural. So repetitive smashing, yanking, etc. Pushing things and pulling things too, so pushups and horizontal rows mimic things nicely. But pullups? Again, nothing against that most sacred of sacred cows, the pullup and chinup.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:48 AM

Depends how paleo you wanna go, bro. We vegans are the OG paleos from 10 million years ago and routinely swing from branches.

1
1ec4e7ca085b7f8d5821529653e1e35a

(5506)

on November 10, 2011
at 04:09 PM

If paleo man were to perform a pull up (to get into a tree or something) but did not have the strength to do so, he would kip.

0
F850d793ff83a8deac524a459e520bf3

on August 28, 2012
at 11:27 PM

I hate kip pull ups. They are unnatural to attempt. So I doubt cavemen would have don them, or classic pull ups for that matter.

0
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on November 13, 2011
at 10:01 PM

Perhaps my British humour is received as well as whole-wheat bagel on here. :)

0
Ba20b502cf02b5513ea8c4bb2740d8cb

on November 10, 2011
at 05:54 PM

Not unless he was trying to pull himself over a cliff to hunt down a deer.

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