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Eating carbohydrates with fat raise blood sugar the same as eating carbohydrates alone?

Answered on June 18, 2014
Created June 06, 2014 at 2:31 PM

am on VLC/zero c. over year and now i try to eat more like Primal ,so i add sometimes berries to my meal.i know that it still can raise my blood sugar very well after zero carb even it consist not to much fructose but anyway my qw is-is it better to eat sugary fruits with high fat food,such as coconut oil/milk or butter to not raise blood sugar so much or it still will raise like rocket and i will feel like you know what? P/S after 1 year not eating any fruit i feel that am very fat adapted and was very strict to adapt and i can and i want some natural vitamin C as HELL! =D

Medium avatar

on June 14, 2014
at 04:08 AM

I can't speak for every culture on earth. I'm lucky I know two pretty well: my own and the Eskimo's. But even the Eskimo cultures, I only know based on books. Something tells me most hunter gatherers did eat some kind of protein though, maybe fish if they are islanders?

Ffc7e0ecad8e8831b528c5d4921377cc

(942)

on June 14, 2014
at 03:51 AM

Thanks. I think I have been making the mistake of thinking I needed to eat lots of fat with carbs, with the result that my glucose is always high.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on June 08, 2014
at 02:15 PM

I'm sure i've heard elsewhere that fat causes insulin secretion, i'm not suprised really, i'd think anything that we eat would do so, it just depends to what extent i guess.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on June 08, 2014
at 02:11 PM

Good info, it seems quite a few pacific islander or kitavan type people have had tubers & coconut fat as their staples for a long time with no apparent issues. I'm not saying that's optimal for most of us exSADers but seems if your not ever exposed to seed oils or refined sugar then you can do pretty well on a starch/fat diet, funny when you think how most of the half sucrose/half fat SAD foods are the worse offenders.

0ba891d22837788c4d5ccf3f33f60329

(30)

on June 07, 2014
at 05:15 AM

I think the "fat lowers blunts insulin response" claim is a myth, since fat does lower blood glucose, but even though you might expect it would therefore lower insulin it doesn't necessarily. "The addition of fat to a carbohydrate meal also reduced the postprandial glucose response...however, despite the lower blood glucose levels in the presence of fat the insulin response was not reduced, suggesting a potentiation of insulin secretion in the presence of fat" http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6342357

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on June 06, 2014
at 11:30 PM

@Robert 13 Jaminet talks a bit about that in his article here; how-to-minimize-hyperglycemic-toxicity.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on June 06, 2014
at 06:01 PM

Berries are some of the lowest glycemic index fruits that can be eaten and are not particularly sugary. The ones that would get you are things like bananas / pineapple and watermelons.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/best-and-worst-frui...

Medium avatar

on June 06, 2014
at 05:27 PM

thank u very much to clear things up,u sounds very smart in that.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 06, 2014
at 05:14 PM

So, since you're not a type 1 diabetic, eating fat with carbs will slow the insulin response, which will ultimate result in a higher blood sugar number for a longer period of time. From my understanding fat does not slow the release of sugar into the bloodstream nearly as much as fiber and the shape/size of the glucose polymers.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 06, 2014
at 05:09 PM

There are 2 tpyes of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. That being said, the normal population and type 2 diabetics still operate on the same system, just type 2 diabetics are just worn out (but can be repaired, i.e. "cured"). Type 1 diabetics don't even operate on the same system and that can't be "cured" in the conventional sense of the term...it can be treated though.

Medium avatar

on June 06, 2014
at 05:05 PM

thank u for answering.i can find only information for diabetes people,but am not a diabetes.so i think it's kind of different for healthy people...

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on June 06, 2014
at 04:54 PM

I'm not sure if what I said was exactly right so thanks for clarifying, I was basically just trying to give the Jaminet side of it where he advises carbs with a high fat meal as he thinks that's a safer way of having them.

Medium avatar

on June 06, 2014
at 04:20 PM

thanks.i don't use glucometer too.but from my experiment i feel good after berries with high fat dairy even.no headaches or hot flushes.so i guess am on right way)

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5 Answers

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De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

on June 06, 2014
at 03:54 PM

Some say that eating carbs with fat stops blood sugar spiking too high and the fat blunts insulin response, so carbs should always be eaten in the context of a high fat meal.

I don't use a glucose meter so I don't know, I think that would be the only way to tell if it works for you.

Some other people say to never eat carbs with fat because it's a deadly combination, I don't think some berries with cream are gonna kill you though!

Medium avatar

on June 06, 2014
at 04:20 PM

thanks.i don't use glucometer too.but from my experiment i feel good after berries with high fat dairy even.no headaches or hot flushes.so i guess am on right way)

0ba891d22837788c4d5ccf3f33f60329

(30)

on June 07, 2014
at 05:15 AM

I think the "fat lowers blunts insulin response" claim is a myth, since fat does lower blood glucose, but even though you might expect it would therefore lower insulin it doesn't necessarily. "The addition of fat to a carbohydrate meal also reduced the postprandial glucose response...however, despite the lower blood glucose levels in the presence of fat the insulin response was not reduced, suggesting a potentiation of insulin secretion in the presence of fat" http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6342357

0
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on June 18, 2014
at 05:37 PM

It will raise your blood sugar slower than carbs alone, but it will still raise your blood sugar inevitably

0
Medium avatar

on June 08, 2014
at 12:48 PM

I wouldn't worry about small amounts of berries or fruits, and especially if you've been zero carbs for a while, you're probably insulin resistant now and will be a for a few days until your body adjusts to the new normal. Your gut probably has even stopped making receptors for various sugars since it hasn't needed them in a while. No biggie, in a week, all will be readjusted. The body is flexible. A small amount of fat eaten with sweet things will lower the glycemic index by slowing the entry of sugars into the bloodstream. You still get all the sugars, but you get them more slowly, and hopefully no spike.

The "deadly" comment you sometimes hear has to do with metabolism. There are 3 ways to make energy: glycolysis (sugar-->ATP), beta oxidation (fat --> ATP) and the H+ gradient (can't think of the name for it, brain cramp, sorry.., starts with a p???? argh!)... The H+ gradient is formed mostly from glycolysis which is a very inefficient way to make ATP except that it forms a massive gradient that also forms tons of ATP... however in the process, each H+ is of course a free radical so it can denature just about anything it touches. If there are fats floating around too.... now you have hydrogenated trans fats formed inside your cells. That's the theory anyway.

No, it won't kill you outright. People have been eating starch/sugar + fat for generations and living to 90+. But they didn't consider those foods healthy or staples (ie. cake, cookies, pies). Great grandma mostly lived on stew.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on June 08, 2014
at 02:11 PM

Good info, it seems quite a few pacific islander or kitavan type people have had tubers & coconut fat as their staples for a long time with no apparent issues. I'm not saying that's optimal for most of us exSADers but seems if your not ever exposed to seed oils or refined sugar then you can do pretty well on a starch/fat diet, funny when you think how most of the half sucrose/half fat SAD foods are the worse offenders.

Medium avatar

on June 14, 2014
at 04:08 AM

I can't speak for every culture on earth. I'm lucky I know two pretty well: my own and the Eskimo's. But even the Eskimo cultures, I only know based on books. Something tells me most hunter gatherers did eat some kind of protein though, maybe fish if they are islanders?

0
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on June 06, 2014
at 04:50 PM

I may be wrong here, but I think a lot of people are confused about insulin and blood sugar and diabetes type 2 vs type 1 in general.

Insulin transports glucose to cells. If you have fat with carbs, it delays the insulin response. Therefore, glucose stays elevated longer when given an a meal of equivalent carbs and varying fat proportions.

Now, if you have a high insulin sensitivity, less insulin will be required to dispose of a given amount of carbs. Needing less insulin to dispose of glucose from being fit and having a high insulin sensitivity is not mimicked by merely adding fat to carbs...that just slows the insulin response and glucose is kept elevated longer.

It is not an increase in fat that improves blood sugar. It is a reduction in carbs and/or an increase in insulin sensitivity. This is true for normal populations and even type 2 diabetics/pre diabetics. Different rules apply entirely for type 1 diabetics so Dr. Bernstein is NOT an authority on the issue for healthy peoples (for some reason his book is popular among crossfitters I've met...no clue why that is).

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on June 06, 2014
at 04:54 PM

I'm not sure if what I said was exactly right so thanks for clarifying, I was basically just trying to give the Jaminet side of it where he advises carbs with a high fat meal as he thinks that's a safer way of having them.

Medium avatar

on June 06, 2014
at 05:05 PM

thank u for answering.i can find only information for diabetes people,but am not a diabetes.so i think it's kind of different for healthy people...

Ffc7e0ecad8e8831b528c5d4921377cc

(942)

on June 14, 2014
at 03:51 AM

Thanks. I think I have been making the mistake of thinking I needed to eat lots of fat with carbs, with the result that my glucose is always high.

0
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on June 06, 2014
at 04:36 PM

If fat blunts insulin response, then blood glucose levels would be HIGHER from eating fat with carbs as opposed to carbs alone. Insulin transports glucose to cells throughout the body. Less of it and the same amount of carbs would mean slower reduction of blood sugar and sharper rise, all else being equal.

An oral glucose test uses dextrose (glucose solution) in the absence of fat because they are testing your insulin sensitivity. Higher insulin sensitivity means less insulin is required to transport the same amount of carbs into cells and eliminate it from the blood stream and blood sugar is quickly returned to normal levels,

It is a slight but very important distinction between blood sugar response, insulin response, and insulin sensitivity.

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