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Are non-hybridized grains that are properly prepared really that bad for a healthy person with an otherwise healthy diet

Answered on December 05, 2013
Created December 02, 2013 at 10:12 PM

I get that grains are a concentrated source of lectins, phytic acid, enzyme inhibitors and aren't super nutrient dense, but put things in perspective here. as far as lectins go, a decent fermentation and thorough cooking will take care of most of those (as in bringing it down to levels of common plant foods), and the fermentation will take care of the phytic acid too. About the nutrient density of grains, while I agree they aren't super nutritious, they have a lot more than what people give them credit for. Just look on chronometer, or the usda data bases. And if your really trying to maximize nutrient density, a better step to take would be to eliminate oils and pure fats, rather than one of the only rich sources of magnesium in an otherwise paleo diet. Furthermore, grains are so cheap that you would be able to spend copious amounts of saved money on even more vegetables, fruits, higher quality meats and dairy, and many other things. I do agree on multiple things though, like the fact that modern wheat is pretty close to toxic, and that grains that aren't properly prepared are pretty bad for you. I don't currently eat grains... I'm just speculating

Medium avatar

(238)

on December 03, 2013
at 09:48 PM

http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/press-media/faqs/

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on December 03, 2013
at 09:06 PM

I see where your coming from, but my goals are most likely completely different than yours were. Number 1, I'm assuming that the sourdough that you gained weight on was white wheat flour, and that's about the worst that you can get in terms of safe to non safe grains. Number 2 I'm an extremely active individual who struggles to meet daily energy needs and I have actually missed multiple days of school because of sickness through the effort of trying to get all those calories, so that's another reason I've been trying fermented grains

2eb1b3e896624be5506029e3fec3e9e2

(10)

on December 03, 2013
at 04:36 PM

"gained tons of weight" that means you ate more than you thought you did :)

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5 Answers

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 04, 2013
at 03:27 PM

Unlikely - no amount of preparation (soaking, cooking, fermenting) will get rid of the gliadin or gluten. Sure, you'll get rid of the phytates, but the worse, more harmful stuff is still there. Perhaps for non-gluten carrying grains, but otherwise, no - and even then, those have gluten like analogues.

Yes, the non-hybridized versions will have far less gluten than modern versions and this is a factor in why they're less harmful. But note the wording: less harmful is still harmful.

In terms of fermenting it, it's possible that the yeasts are somewhat harmful to us - remember, they too don't want to be consumed, and want to push out their competition, so they produce toxins. Penicilin was the attack vector that a certain mold produced to push out its competition - that's why it was an effective antibiotic.

Now if you want to go hydrolize all the protein down to the free aminos with some nasty chemical or high heat/pressure industrial process, perhaps you'll manage to break down all the gluten and gliadin, but that opens another can of worms: free glutamate, and since there's no more gluten, your flour will no longer be elastic and you'll be left with just a source of high-glycemic starches, so, really, what's the point?

Best leave the grains for the creatures adapted to eat them: birds and mice.

My kids really, really, really wanted pizza, and I found a brand of tapioca based dough mix that worked very nicely. I unfortunately haven't been able to replicate it with straight tapioca flour (it becomes very sticky). (One of my kids is allergic to nuts, so almond flour is out for us.)

If you're really craving, find alternate, non-grain flours such as almond, white-rice, coconut, etc. But, remember, the cravings come from the exorphins in wheat. They are morphine like compounds which are not quite as addictive as the real thing, so that's why you even considered this.

0
F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on December 04, 2013
at 05:50 AM

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/soaked-sprouted-fermented-grains/#axzz2mTiSNRSf

http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2010/09/digestibility-of-soaked-sprouted-and-fermented-grains.html

http://www.culturedfoodlife.com/sourdough-sprouted/

edited 12-4-13

http://aem.asm.org/content/70/2/1088.fullI

@raydawg I fully agree with your analysis & position. Wheat ain't great. Wheat and other grains modified by 'other processes' may be 'less harmful' but are still harmful.

However, our inquisitive young associate has different objectives, desires & operating conditions than we do. He's looking to fuel, as best he can, on a budget, some pretty intensive physical activity. We may not agree with his choses but I think we can help as best we can to maximize his results and minimize the harm.

His constraints make an 'acceptable' solution difficult. He needs fuel 'on the cheap". I think he's going to have to settle for 'least bad'. :(

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on December 03, 2013
at 04:06 PM

If you are trying to be Paleo then they don't work. Many people seem to get by eating grains and live healthy lives, I'm not one of them so I am biased against them. IMO nothing better tasting then a fresh out of the oven homemade sourdough loaf, used to eat them all the time and gained tons of weight. Wheat, salt, water and sourdough culture, no bs additives.

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on December 03, 2013
at 09:06 PM

I see where your coming from, but my goals are most likely completely different than yours were. Number 1, I'm assuming that the sourdough that you gained weight on was white wheat flour, and that's about the worst that you can get in terms of safe to non safe grains. Number 2 I'm an extremely active individual who struggles to meet daily energy needs and I have actually missed multiple days of school because of sickness through the effort of trying to get all those calories, so that's another reason I've been trying fermented grains

2eb1b3e896624be5506029e3fec3e9e2

(10)

on December 03, 2013
at 04:36 PM

"gained tons of weight" that means you ate more than you thought you did :)

0
2eb1b3e896624be5506029e3fec3e9e2

on December 03, 2013
at 07:12 AM

BREAD FTW WOOOHOOOOOOOOOOOO

0
Medium avatar

on December 02, 2013
at 10:26 PM

No. They are fine, with the precautions that you prescribed.

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