4

votes

Do athletes supplement with pregnenolone? should they?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 26, 2011 at 4:08 AM

Workouts, especially high intensity ones are highly stressful and can cause a lot of cortisol release. If one major sign of overtraining is an increased cortisol:testosterone ratio, isn't that an acute pregnenolone steal? During intense training wouldn't a small pregnenolone supplement help this?

I am going to try a little self-experiment taking it after workouts. Any downsides?

It doesn't seem to be on banned substance lists, the only potential problem is having to much testosterone on a drug test. Well, that and downregulating endogenous production.

Here is a simplified look

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on December 26, 2011
at 10:50 PM

That's not an outlier study, it's a typical study. DHEA simply has a negligible effect on testosterone in the vast majority of cases. The positive effects are not due to any effect on testosterone. If you want to raise testosterone or free testosterone, go here and search: http://www.ergo-log.com/

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 26, 2011
at 06:29 PM

ha I didn't actually make it but I have been learning how to make those.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on December 26, 2011
at 05:52 PM

Nice diagram !

Medium avatar

(8239)

on December 26, 2011
at 05:01 PM

The Quilt is factually correct. I have exhaustively studied the lit of DHEA, pregenolone, and testosterone, with the aim of achieving optimal levels including with supplementation as an option. Dive into the deep end of the research beyond the eccentricity of single outlier studies.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 26, 2011
at 01:53 PM

Pregenelone definitely work

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on December 26, 2011
at 01:36 PM

That is akin to swimming on the surface of the ocean and saying it is three feet deep. Its way more complex than this and this study is a joke compared to the clinical effects found over the last fifty years in endocrinology of the steroid pathways

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on December 26, 2011
at 08:07 AM

DHEA works very well to raise...DHEA AND DHEAs. Not testosterone. Example: http://jap.physiology.org/content/87/6/2274.full

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on December 26, 2011
at 05:14 AM

Not true.......it works very well.

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4 Answers

1
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 26, 2011
at 01:59 PM

If you have proper hormone function i.e. your in good health or young, You probably don't need it necessarily. Making sure to eat ample sugars(before, during and after workout) and nutrients(vit A specifically) would have the same benefit.

If you are older or have hormone problems it could have benefits. Ray peat has experimented with the stuff and says theirs no danger and its safe in very high doses.

http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/three-hormones.shtml do-athletes-supplement-with-pregnenolone?-should-they?

1
Medium avatar

on December 26, 2011
at 01:58 PM

DHEA works to balance out cortisol so it's a good option, but there are other options out there as well such as phosphatidylserine http://www.sportssupplements.net/phosphatidyl-serine/. For the athletes involved in more intense exercise DHEA would probably be the better choice.

I haven't researched pregnenolone supplementation specifically for athletes, but I think it makes sense as a way to prevent pregnenolone steal syndrome and high cortisol. Also, research shows it has a ton of other health benefits http://www.healthiertalk.com/pregnenolone-happiness-hormone-0105.

0
0267df248d0f1e42dba5d2cd3ca0bd36

on May 22, 2013
at 01:42 PM

So, did you have good results taking pregnenolone for exercise?

-2
25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on December 26, 2011
at 05:03 AM

I don't believe so, probably because it doesn't work. The chart looks nice, but does supplemental DHEA--which has valid uses--actually up testosterone to any significant degree? Nope.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on December 26, 2011
at 05:14 AM

Not true.......it works very well.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 26, 2011
at 01:53 PM

Pregenelone definitely work

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on December 26, 2011
at 10:50 PM

That's not an outlier study, it's a typical study. DHEA simply has a negligible effect on testosterone in the vast majority of cases. The positive effects are not due to any effect on testosterone. If you want to raise testosterone or free testosterone, go here and search: http://www.ergo-log.com/

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on December 26, 2011
at 08:07 AM

DHEA works very well to raise...DHEA AND DHEAs. Not testosterone. Example: http://jap.physiology.org/content/87/6/2274.full

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on December 26, 2011
at 01:36 PM

That is akin to swimming on the surface of the ocean and saying it is three feet deep. Its way more complex than this and this study is a joke compared to the clinical effects found over the last fifty years in endocrinology of the steroid pathways

Medium avatar

(8239)

on December 26, 2011
at 05:01 PM

The Quilt is factually correct. I have exhaustively studied the lit of DHEA, pregenolone, and testosterone, with the aim of achieving optimal levels including with supplementation as an option. Dive into the deep end of the research beyond the eccentricity of single outlier studies.

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