9

votes

Pregnant ladies, did you tell your doctor/midwife/obstetrician about your paleo diet?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 10, 2012 at 4:51 AM

What were your experiences? Would you recommend keeping your diet on the low, so as to avoid arguments with medical staff? Would you ever mention that you eat liver or take cod liver oil (given the fear of Vitamin A), or mention that you're getting folate from food (not folic acid supplements)?

I guess I'm mostly wondering whether the stress of (potentially) having to argue my case to a medical person is worth the effort, or if I'm better off nodding and smiling and going on my way.

Anyone found themselves in this situation?

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on July 09, 2012
at 01:42 AM

Wow, 80 hours. The birth must have cost you 200,000 dollars.

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:09 AM

(They are also very supportive of minimally invasive or natural childbirth IN the hospital. When I had my daughter, there was absolutely NO pressure for an epidural or pitocin... even though I was in labor for close to 80 hours. They calmly monitored me and let me call every single shot. My OB even got me ice chips and juice so my husband could stay with me in labor.

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:07 AM

My very traditional OB at BWH in Boston (top maternity hospital) thinks my diet is awesome and loves that I do modified kettlebells. You wouldn't think it, coming from an OB with the Brigham, but I give them credit - they are just happy to see a healthy pregnancy, and encourage women to continue doing anything that is contributing to that healthy pregnancy.

2ea24c22690b54e938229b140dcf60f7

(158)

on May 12, 2012
at 06:35 AM

Try these http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10622209 http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2805%2960563-6/fulltext and http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1600-0412.2003.00187.x/abstract I massively failed my OGTT after being low-carb paleo for the last 5 months. 4x daily finger sticks have shown optimal sugar levels. Now I'm having to carb-load to re-take the OGTT and get this dang diagnosis taken off my charts.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on May 11, 2012
at 12:21 PM

Thanks, Stefanie. Interesting. When I asked the question, I wondered whether or not folic acid could cause any health problems. I haven't heard that before (and I had never given any thought between the difference between folate and folic acid). I plan on getting pregnant some time in the next year and I'm trying to prep myself by gathering as much info as I can. This will be something I research more. Thanks!

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on May 11, 2012
at 03:25 AM

Thanks, Stefanie.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 11, 2012
at 02:39 AM

Not really defensive or touchy...just weary of the belief that supplements trump excellent food sources. It just seems obvious to me that folic acid supplementation, along with things like iron-fortified baby cereal, are SAD protocols.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 11, 2012
at 02:27 AM

"Not necessarily" is not synonymous with "likely." But sure, self-educated laypeople are also not necessarily on top of recent literature.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 11, 2012
at 12:05 AM

Ooh this gives me hope!

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 11, 2012
at 12:02 AM

Hi Mandy, there has been a lot of debate about folic acid vs. folate (they are different). My instinct is to believe that Mother Nature provides what we need, and that getting folate from foods is best. Add to this the arguments that folic acid causes various problems, and isn't synthesised into folate in the body very well anyway and... that's why I'm not taking the supplement.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 11, 2012
at 12:00 AM

Liver, spinach, et al. Check out the WAPF guidelines, that's what I'm following (but with less dairy as I don't tolerate it, and no grains except rice). http://www.westonaprice.org/childrens-health/diet-for-pregnant-and-nursing-mothers

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 10, 2012
at 11:58 PM

Good point, diet is just one piece of the puzzle.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 10, 2012
at 11:55 PM

Hi tdgor, I guess this was part of why I asked my question - just a tiny fear that.... what if my own education is lacking even a tiny bit... as confident as I am... there is another human being to think about... having said that, the 'what if' fear could equally apply to medical professionals... what if the doctors are wrong on something. And if they aren't 100% up to speed with what I'm doing, how can they provide the right advice anyway. I'll see how I go - hopefully I'll find an open-minded doctor/midwife etc with whom I can be honest and open, without fear of reprimand!

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 10:53 PM

Well, let's see, I originally suggested that it might be prudent to talk to one's medical practitioner because they might actually know something. So the first comment was docs are "definitely not likely to be up on current nutritional research." I pointed to my n=1 of docs well-informed on nutrition in their specialties. You noted that "Those who are self-educated because of their specialties are not necessarily on top of the most recent literature." You are saying that the knowledge of the self-educated is likely to be incomplete. My point is that this applies with a vengeance to laypeople

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on May 10, 2012
at 09:51 PM

Blossom, I'm not sure why you're so defensive. I asked a question, no need to get so upset. I'm trying to learn here, just like everyone else. I'm sorry this is such a touchy topic for you.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 10, 2012
at 09:33 PM

I didn't say self-education was bad, so I'm not sure what response you're after.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 07:56 PM

Aren't most of us self-educated too?

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 10, 2012
at 07:01 PM

I'm with Dragonfly. Husband had to take a short course and that was it. He readily admits his peers know very little. Those who do know a lot are self-educated. Those who are self-educated because of their specialties are not necessarily on top of the most recent literature. There are plenty of cardiologists who still tell patients not to eat more than a couple egg yolks per week.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 10, 2012
at 06:56 PM

Also, I dislike this "on the safe side" talk...on the safe side of *what*, precisely? On the safe side of "I am eating enough liver to meet and exceed my folate needs, but I somehow feel it's good practice to dump a supplement on top of that." Getting your nutrients from food rather than pills is not a questionable practice.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 10, 2012
at 06:52 PM

Yes, how did nature produce healthy babies before folic acid supplements? In this case, liver is the "cadillac" insurance and a supplement is minimum coverage. You don't need supplemental coverage if you have a top of the line plan.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on May 10, 2012
at 05:46 PM

Good to know....but why not just take folic acid as insurance?

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 04:02 PM

And then there's this: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199109263251303#t=abstract cited to in one of the comments to the Robb Wolf article above.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 03:37 PM

that they are being born into an environment of scarcity. The fact that ketogenic diets downregulate T3 and slow the thyroid in non-pregnant people raises the question about whether a ketogenic diet might also have a negative effect on the baby's developing thyroid." here: http://diabetesupdate.blogspot.com/2011/10/normal-blood-sugars-in-pregnancy.html I understand that this is speculation but causes me some concern.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 03:35 PM

I found this: "Very low carb diets raise the concentration of ketones in the blood. This isn't a problem when we aren't pregnant--most of our organs can run quite happily burning ketones. But because ketones are usually produced when humans are starving, it is very possible that fetuses produced when the mother is in a ketogenic state may end up with environmentally-produced permanent changes to their genes (epigenetic changes, to use a technical term) that will predispose them to gaining weight once they are born, because ketones may signal the forming baby

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 03:28 PM

Clearly I have a lot of research to do here. I thought that insulin resistance was bad.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 03:27 PM

Meh. I've had treatment providers (my OB/GYN and opthalmologist) who are very well-versed in nutrition as it affects their specialties.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:49 PM

Great answer! I wish more women would take this approach.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:48 PM

Folic acid isn't as ideal (since it needs to be converted to folate) as folate from a food source. Liver is a great source of folate.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:46 PM

FWIW, most doctors take one nutrition course in their entire career. They are definitely not likely to be up on current nutritional research.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:44 PM

Actually, tdgor, this is common because of the insulin resistance caused by low carb diets. Read this: http://robbwolf.com/2010/09/06/gestational-diabetes-what-constitutes-low-blood-sugar/

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 01:10 PM

And, sorry, I assumed you had a GTT. Did you have a GCT? My reaction is still the same. You wouldn't fail a challenge test because of low sugar consumption in your regular diet.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 12:59 PM

I don't understand the "because" in there. You're saying that you flunked a GTT because you usually don't eat sugar? I didn't think things worked that way. *runs off to research* FWIW I flunked GTTs with all my pregnancies though I didn't limit sugar consumption at the time, but never had GD.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on May 10, 2012
at 12:35 PM

Great question. Can't wait to hear the answers from ladies who have been through this!

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11 Answers

6
E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on May 10, 2012
at 05:32 AM

I nodded and smiled with my midwife a bit. I think I mentioned that I avoided gluten, sugar and "junk" which was fine with her! She trusted me when I told her I was taking a "prenatal", though I didn't mention it didn't contain DHA and I was getting that from fish and cod liver oil. I did take a folic acid supp because of the MTHFR mutation however, just to be safe. I think avoiding the stress of an argument is the way to go.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:49 PM

Great answer! I wish more women would take this approach.

5
7201a46217c0323ae076cb65dd872768

on May 10, 2012
at 12:31 PM

If you're seeing a traditional OB, you might want to avoid "Paleo" and go with you avoid processed foods and sugar and focus on whole, natural food options. Mentioning gluten-free might help. But if you're seeing a midwife, they tend to be more open to discussion and non-traditional approaches so you will probably find more support for Paleo there. At least that was my experience with both an OB and then my midwife. In fact, my ex-OB thought I was nuts hence my change to a midwife who actually began her own research in paleo/primal eating after our first appointment together.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 11, 2012
at 12:05 AM

Ooh this gives me hope!

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:09 AM

(They are also very supportive of minimally invasive or natural childbirth IN the hospital. When I had my daughter, there was absolutely NO pressure for an epidural or pitocin... even though I was in labor for close to 80 hours. They calmly monitored me and let me call every single shot. My OB even got me ice chips and juice so my husband could stay with me in labor.

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:07 AM

My very traditional OB at BWH in Boston (top maternity hospital) thinks my diet is awesome and loves that I do modified kettlebells. You wouldn't think it, coming from an OB with the Brigham, but I give them credit - they are just happy to see a healthy pregnancy, and encourage women to continue doing anything that is contributing to that healthy pregnancy.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on July 09, 2012
at 01:42 AM

Wow, 80 hours. The birth must have cost you 200,000 dollars.

4
89d6f9abf1af437fcfeb77d69c016ad7

on May 10, 2012
at 05:17 PM

I was open to my doctor about being GF, and following a paleo diet. I did however, take B and folic acid supplement (I cannot tolerate prenatal or multi vitamins) to be on the safe side. My doctor did test me a couple times to see where all my levels were, and everything was perfect. I did continue to take my B and folic acid. I also took a non-stimulant greens drink to make sure I got some extra veggies in my diet and added it to my smoothies (since I was not eating a ton of veggies). I was 42 and got pregnant naturally with my first. Because of my age I really wanted to make sure I was getting extra folic acid. And I ate a TON of sweet potatoes to keep my carbs up (along with fruit).

4
Medium avatar

(12379)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:58 PM

I would recommend finding a doc/midwife/obstetrician that was open to discussing your diet with you. I find that there are some very open minded health care providers if you look for them. Because if you're maternity health care provider is not open to your diet, they are likely not to be open to alot of other wishes for your pregnancy, birth and beyond and that will be far more stressful than the arguement over 'paleo'.

If you come into the conversation well versed then there should not be any issues at all.

My maternity doctor was great, the only time she recommended taking any supplements was in the first trimester when I was extrememly nauseous and not eating. For the rest of my pregnancy she advised that a good diet full of whole foods was going to get me better nutrients than any vitamin or supplement on the market. We didn't talk diet much (and I wasn't 'paleo' then), but she did advocate no sugary drinks and loads of fruits, veggies and meats.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 10, 2012
at 11:58 PM

Good point, diet is just one piece of the puzzle.

3
870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 12:52 PM

I don't think you ever do yourself any favors by withholding relevant information (assuming it is truly relevant) from your treatment providers. Using the word "paleo" may not be necessary, however.

If some of your practices turn out to be a bone of contention, ask (respectfully) why and listen to the answer. It may turn out your provider actually knows something that you do not (e.g. current research in obstetrics). If not, or if your provider doesn't like being challenged, you can find another care provider.

Don't forget that the well-being of two people is at stake here, and one is very small and vulnerable. Self-experimentation is one thing. Experimenting on a fetus is quite another.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:46 PM

FWIW, most doctors take one nutrition course in their entire career. They are definitely not likely to be up on current nutritional research.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 07:56 PM

Aren't most of us self-educated too?

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 03:27 PM

Meh. I've had treatment providers (my OB/GYN and opthalmologist) who are very well-versed in nutrition as it affects their specialties.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 10, 2012
at 09:33 PM

I didn't say self-education was bad, so I'm not sure what response you're after.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 10, 2012
at 11:55 PM

Hi tdgor, I guess this was part of why I asked my question - just a tiny fear that.... what if my own education is lacking even a tiny bit... as confident as I am... there is another human being to think about... having said that, the 'what if' fear could equally apply to medical professionals... what if the doctors are wrong on something. And if they aren't 100% up to speed with what I'm doing, how can they provide the right advice anyway. I'll see how I go - hopefully I'll find an open-minded doctor/midwife etc with whom I can be honest and open, without fear of reprimand!

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 11, 2012
at 02:27 AM

"Not necessarily" is not synonymous with "likely." But sure, self-educated laypeople are also not necessarily on top of recent literature.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 10, 2012
at 07:01 PM

I'm with Dragonfly. Husband had to take a short course and that was it. He readily admits his peers know very little. Those who do know a lot are self-educated. Those who are self-educated because of their specialties are not necessarily on top of the most recent literature. There are plenty of cardiologists who still tell patients not to eat more than a couple egg yolks per week.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 10:53 PM

Well, let's see, I originally suggested that it might be prudent to talk to one's medical practitioner because they might actually know something. So the first comment was docs are "definitely not likely to be up on current nutritional research." I pointed to my n=1 of docs well-informed on nutrition in their specialties. You noted that "Those who are self-educated because of their specialties are not necessarily on top of the most recent literature." You are saying that the knowledge of the self-educated is likely to be incomplete. My point is that this applies with a vengeance to laypeople

3
286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

on May 10, 2012
at 05:48 AM

I would not say Paleo - I would say GF and low carb

3
8c64b9c54f591531071e93792156ca15

(187)

on May 10, 2012
at 05:45 AM

My midwife loved it. She couldn't believe a client could eat so healthfully. Because of it, she was comfortable with me opting out of the GD screen at 28 weeks. Around 32 weeks, I started gaining really fast and decided to take the test. Because my sugar consumption was almost nil, my blood sugar reading was off the charts. Coupled with the weight gain, I continued eating paleo, but this time under strict orders. Turns out, there was no GD. Just a baby ready to come early (at 37 weeks).

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 03:35 PM

I found this: "Very low carb diets raise the concentration of ketones in the blood. This isn't a problem when we aren't pregnant--most of our organs can run quite happily burning ketones. But because ketones are usually produced when humans are starving, it is very possible that fetuses produced when the mother is in a ketogenic state may end up with environmentally-produced permanent changes to their genes (epigenetic changes, to use a technical term) that will predispose them to gaining weight once they are born, because ketones may signal the forming baby

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 03:37 PM

that they are being born into an environment of scarcity. The fact that ketogenic diets downregulate T3 and slow the thyroid in non-pregnant people raises the question about whether a ketogenic diet might also have a negative effect on the baby's developing thyroid." here: http://diabetesupdate.blogspot.com/2011/10/normal-blood-sugars-in-pregnancy.html I understand that this is speculation but causes me some concern.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 01:10 PM

And, sorry, I assumed you had a GTT. Did you have a GCT? My reaction is still the same. You wouldn't fail a challenge test because of low sugar consumption in your regular diet.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 12:59 PM

I don't understand the "because" in there. You're saying that you flunked a GTT because you usually don't eat sugar? I didn't think things worked that way. *runs off to research* FWIW I flunked GTTs with all my pregnancies though I didn't limit sugar consumption at the time, but never had GD.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:44 PM

Actually, tdgor, this is common because of the insulin resistance caused by low carb diets. Read this: http://robbwolf.com/2010/09/06/gestational-diabetes-what-constitutes-low-blood-sugar/

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 04:02 PM

And then there's this: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199109263251303#t=abstract cited to in one of the comments to the Robb Wolf article above.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 10, 2012
at 03:28 PM

Clearly I have a lot of research to do here. I thought that insulin resistance was bad.

2ea24c22690b54e938229b140dcf60f7

(158)

on May 12, 2012
at 06:35 AM

Try these http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10622209 http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2805%2960563-6/fulltext and http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1600-0412.2003.00187.x/abstract I massively failed my OGTT after being low-carb paleo for the last 5 months. 4x daily finger sticks have shown optimal sugar levels. Now I'm having to carb-load to re-take the OGTT and get this dang diagnosis taken off my charts.

2
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:25 AM

We didn't want the fight. So we just said that we eat "lean meat, healthy fats, fruits and vegetables". Didn't go into any more detail and never got into any fights.

1
Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:10 AM

I told my OB (Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston - one of the top maternity hospitals in the world) straight up what I eat, why I eat it, and she was happy with me. She was impressed with the dedication, both with time and finances, that we have to our diet.

She had no problem letting me out of the Glucola 25 week GD test and letting me do a fasting blood glucose and a 2 hour post prandial test instead.

She encouraged me to keep my diet and exercise up (modified kettlebells) as the pregnancy is going very smoothly.

Give your healthcare provider some credit - they just want you to be healthy. And think of it this way -- if they aren't going to be receptive and supportive of your diet, you want to find another doctor for your pregnancy, anyways.

1
Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

on May 10, 2012
at 12:50 PM

Curious as to why you wouldn't take folic acid? I would think you might want to take it just to be on the safe side in case you aren't getting enough from food....I'm not trying to be argumentative at all, just genuinely curious. Not that I'm one to talk, 9 times out of 10 I forgot to take my prenatal in my second pregnancy and she was just fine.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 11, 2012
at 02:39 AM

Not really defensive or touchy...just weary of the belief that supplements trump excellent food sources. It just seems obvious to me that folic acid supplementation, along with things like iron-fortified baby cereal, are SAD protocols.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 10, 2012
at 06:52 PM

Yes, how did nature produce healthy babies before folic acid supplements? In this case, liver is the "cadillac" insurance and a supplement is minimum coverage. You don't need supplemental coverage if you have a top of the line plan.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on May 10, 2012
at 09:51 PM

Blossom, I'm not sure why you're so defensive. I asked a question, no need to get so upset. I'm trying to learn here, just like everyone else. I'm sorry this is such a touchy topic for you.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:48 PM

Folic acid isn't as ideal (since it needs to be converted to folate) as folate from a food source. Liver is a great source of folate.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on May 10, 2012
at 05:46 PM

Good to know....but why not just take folic acid as insurance?

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on May 10, 2012
at 06:56 PM

Also, I dislike this "on the safe side" talk...on the safe side of *what*, precisely? On the safe side of "I am eating enough liver to meet and exceed my folate needs, but I somehow feel it's good practice to dump a supplement on top of that." Getting your nutrients from food rather than pills is not a questionable practice.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 11, 2012
at 12:02 AM

Hi Mandy, there has been a lot of debate about folic acid vs. folate (they are different). My instinct is to believe that Mother Nature provides what we need, and that getting folate from foods is best. Add to this the arguments that folic acid causes various problems, and isn't synthesised into folate in the body very well anyway and... that's why I'm not taking the supplement.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on May 11, 2012
at 12:21 PM

Thanks, Stefanie. Interesting. When I asked the question, I wondered whether or not folic acid could cause any health problems. I haven't heard that before (and I had never given any thought between the difference between folate and folic acid). I plan on getting pregnant some time in the next year and I'm trying to prep myself by gathering as much info as I can. This will be something I research more. Thanks!

0
Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

on May 10, 2012
at 12:49 PM

Can I ask you where you are (plan on) getting your folate from? As in which foods?

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on May 11, 2012
at 03:25 AM

Thanks, Stefanie.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on May 11, 2012
at 12:00 AM

Liver, spinach, et al. Check out the WAPF guidelines, that's what I'm following (but with less dairy as I don't tolerate it, and no grains except rice). http://www.westonaprice.org/childrens-health/diet-for-pregnant-and-nursing-mothers

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