7

votes

Pregnant and getting freaked out by conventional wisdom.

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 31, 2012 at 5:42 PM

So, just found out I'm pregnant... While I am alternately generally freaking out and in denial, I'm also thinking about what I should eat.

Is there anyone who can reassure my desire to continue to eat the conventional pregnancy no-nos, such as raw egg yolks (in homemade mayo), lots of oily fish, liver and to add raw milk to my diet. Reading the WAP recommendations I'm keen to include these in my diet, but the blaring 'danger danger' warnings from the NHS (I'm in UK) and all the pregnancy websites out there and making me second-guess my instincts.

Should I follow WAP or are the tiny risks of these foods not worth it?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 17, 2012
at 07:06 PM

@ben you can absolutely buy fresh caught fish, I wasn't saying you couldn't. However, to be sold in a restaurant uncooked the regulations require that it be frozen first. You just have to hope your local restaurant is following the rules, or your buddy who invites you over for a sushi party is aware of the need to freeze it.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 06, 2012
at 10:35 PM

Oh my goodness. All of these paleo babby threads on PH are teaching me things I never knew about pregnancy...

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 02, 2012
at 07:55 PM

It only happened maybe 3 or 4 times with the last pregnancy, but yes, random people just walk up and start rubbing your belly. It is weird. I've yet to come up with good response, I just stand there and smile patiently. The belly rubbing isn't as bad as the constant stream of unsolicited advice and worst case scenario stories though. Headphones are not a bad idea when out in public.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 02, 2012
at 06:06 AM

That's cool...husband has some livestock experience and we were thinking of doing sheep or goats once we settle someplace more permanent. And that is kinda gross. Lol.

F9013a3c7944d40c983e955f3cc83627

(320)

on August 02, 2012
at 12:24 AM

no.. it had no aftertaste actually. she was fed a diet of alfalfa, and had the opportunity to graze. she didn't smell, but her mate DID. what is hilarious/disgusting is that that goaty taste (like goat cheese) is the same smell as the male's urine. I still have affection for the taste though, despite.

E1e798ccd4eed67665652941b9ef7796

(483)

on August 01, 2012
at 08:07 AM

Thanks - that's reassuring

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:37 AM

+1 for a goat named "Marshmallow!" Do you find it at all goaty when it's super-fresh? The raw goat's milk I picked up at the store had a distinct aftertaste.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:32 AM

Somewhat off-topic, but as a for-now childless woman planning on changing that in a few years...people do that?? Random people try to touch your stomach?? What do you do in response?

8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

(2830)

on July 31, 2012
at 10:13 PM

"Food and Drug Administration regulations stipulate that fish to be eaten raw -- whether as sushi, sashimi, seviche, or tartare -- must be frozen first, to kill parasites." http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/08/nyregion/sushi-fresh-from-the-deep-the-deep-freeze.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on July 31, 2012
at 10:03 PM

Sleepyhouse22. I wasn't condemning your answer by putting part of it in quotes. Sorry if you thought that. Was emphasizing the trade off. On the other hand you don't have to do all the raw stuff and eat liver etc. to eat healthy during a pregnancy.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 31, 2012
at 08:39 PM

that's totally inaccurate. Fresh caught fish does not need to be frozen to be legally sold in the US.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 31, 2012
at 08:19 PM

Both of my pregnancies were roller coaster rides. There were definite highs and lows. I had moments of feeling great and other times where I felt like a beached whale. I wouldn't trade any of those memories for the world!

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 31, 2012
at 08:15 PM

I want to warn you about food aversions, don't be freaked out if you don't have much control over what sounds good in the next few months. Meat and green vegetable aversions are pretty common, and may even have their place in protecting the baby from too much protein and bitter alkaloids in the first trimester. Fruit, dairy, and beige foods tend to appeal more in the early months. I felt like a paleo failure the with first pregnancy, and turned my back on it completely, with the second, I've anticipated the aversions, and planned accordingly, to stay closer to it, even if I do eat oatmeal.

8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

(2830)

on July 31, 2012
at 08:08 PM

Check this out; it may cheer you: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2860824/?tool=pubmed

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:58 PM

I see what you're saying. They should tell you to avoid crap too.

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:46 PM

ALSO, since my boyfriend and I were so appalled by this, we started researching the effects of eating poorly during pregnancy and what it does to your child. It was QUITE impressive the toll it takes on your baby's development. Too bad so many moms just don't care.

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:43 PM

The point is that doctors tell you to avoid all of these things - why not tell women to avoid eating crap instead? Sure, she avoided those things she was told, but she was allowed to eat pizza and entire packages of oreos at a time. Why wasn't that suggested as something not to eat? Doctors need to be nutritionists for women who need assitance in that department.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:34 PM

That makes zero sense. Avoiding potentially harmful foods doesn't leave you with only crap to eat. You can eat meat, cheese, fruit, veggies. What was your friend's Dr. telling her to avoid, anything healthy? Anything that doesn't come in a box? Sounds like she was making excuses not to eat well while she was pregnant.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:33 PM

Raw fish is a very old food, perhaps the new sushi style presentation is new, but it has been in the human diet for a long time. The NIH in the US has given sushi the green light for pregnancy, there was initially a misunderstanding thinking that it was served fresh caught, making it a potential carrier of parasites, but to be legally sold, at least in the states, it has to go into a deep freeze for 2 weeks first, which kills the parasites. If you want it, eat sushi, and enjoy, it is great source of B6, which is important in pregnancy.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:30 PM

I was ambivalent with both my pregnancies in the beginning too. It's hard to get really exited when you haven't heard a heartbeat, seen a ultrasound, or felt a kick. Congratulations:)

3ab5e1b9eba22a071f653330b7fc9579

(2262)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:25 PM

Actually easting sushi isnt really that risky either, but it is really all the woman's decision. http://www.babymed.com/food-and-nutrition/how-safe-it-eat-sushi-or-raw-fish-during-pregnancy

E1e798ccd4eed67665652941b9ef7796

(483)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:50 PM

Thanks Jack. That's encouraging. While I'm in denial I'm actually going to have a baby (what on earth would I do with one of those?!?), I'm sure I'd like it to be a perfect one!

E1e798ccd4eed67665652941b9ef7796

(483)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:48 PM

Thanks. I feel totally ambivalent about it at the moment, but I read that's actually quite common so now I feel less guilty for not jumping up and down with joy...

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:47 PM

Very sensible words from mike on this one. Cost benefit all way way. Nothing wrong with sushi or raw cheese but simple why risk it for 9 months' time?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:45 PM

While I'm not sayin to avoid all raw foods I'd like to clarify that in Japan many many women avoid sushi while pregnant. Also, sushi is a very modern recent food that was absolutely not a part of any traditional Japanese diet. We need to be accurate in our comparisons between cultures.

E1e798ccd4eed67665652941b9ef7796

(483)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:45 PM

I'm actually less conflicted about liver as info on WAP shows those vitamin A fears are unfounded... Although while I usually love liver I've found it less palatable / appetizing since I got pregnant...

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:45 PM

Unfortunately listeria does not respect reputation.

8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

(2830)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:28 PM

Oh, liver - right, the vitamin A thing.

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:22 PM

And yes. Congrats! Enjoy this wonderful exciting time!

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:20 PM

I agree with miked. Do the research. I know farmer moms (and other moms) who drink raw milk all the time and during pregnancy. Not a problem. You know better than anyone else what has been working for you and how you feel. You might want to pick and choose, but I can't see giving it all up.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:19 PM

Congratulations!

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:19 PM

I just think it's dumb... my friend had to avoid practically everything and it left her with crap food to consume. She couldn't enjoy a simple caesar salad because of anchovies, mayo, and unpasteurized cheese. There is so much on the list of foods to avoid and then you will hear otherwise. IMO, I would just follow a paleo diet because of the amount of nutrients for the baby and yourself. I don't think I'll be following all these food guidelines myself.

E1e798ccd4eed67665652941b9ef7796

(483)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:13 PM

I have been researching and the advice is contradictory! And it's not about paleo vs SAD, rather more specifically about the foods I've been told to avoid...

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:11 PM

Of course you need to eat healthy. I said the baby was fine, I didn't say the mom was fine. She is absoulutely not fine and completely ruined herself during pregnancy because she said she was pregnant and could eat anything she wanted. Now she's paying for it.

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:09 PM

"Her baby turned out just fine btw. But what is the trade off by avoiding those specific foods and then consuming mass amounts of SAD crap?" Yes, baby might turn out just fine, but the entire thing might take a toll on your health if you don't eat healthy. My daughter is doing paleo pregnancy. She mentioned a website called the paleo baby. www.thepaleobaby.com I know that after two pregnancies with preeclampsia, her blood pressure is the lowest it's been with this one.

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12 Answers

10
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on July 31, 2012
at 05:47 PM

Well, my wife did a 100% paleo diet pretty much ignoring any conventional wisdom stuff. Though, she did avoid raw foods like the raw eggs and sushi. For her is was a cost-benefit thing. It's easy to give up on the raw foods even though she loves sushi just to not have the added risk of getting any food poisoning. Don't follow rules for rules sake, but also don't just throw them all out just because you don't want to follow conventional wisdom. Examine each case independently and see what the risks and costs are for you and make your decisions that way.

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:20 PM

I agree with miked. Do the research. I know farmer moms (and other moms) who drink raw milk all the time and during pregnancy. Not a problem. You know better than anyone else what has been working for you and how you feel. You might want to pick and choose, but I can't see giving it all up.

3ab5e1b9eba22a071f653330b7fc9579

(2262)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:25 PM

Actually easting sushi isnt really that risky either, but it is really all the woman's decision. http://www.babymed.com/food-and-nutrition/how-safe-it-eat-sushi-or-raw-fish-during-pregnancy

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:22 PM

And yes. Congrats! Enjoy this wonderful exciting time!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:47 PM

Very sensible words from mike on this one. Cost benefit all way way. Nothing wrong with sushi or raw cheese but simple why risk it for 9 months' time?

4
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 31, 2012
at 08:07 PM

First pregnancy I followed all the rules, and then with the second, all I've wanted is what is on the forbidden list, so I did some research and have come to the conclusion that much of what we are told is waaaay overblown.

If you are eating pastured steaks, you don't have to cook them all the way through, just make sure the outside is sufficiently seared to kill any cooties that may have accumulated during processing. A well done steak makes me gag because of an enhanced gag reflex during pregnancy, but one cooked perfectly rare or medium-rare I have found to still be palatable.

Many aged cheeses are now pasteurized, so the listeria threat is greatly diminished, you just have to check the ingredients list. With fresh raw milk, the threat of running into anything nasty with it is far less than getting in a car accident, and I haven't seen any suggestions that pregnant women shouldn't ride in automobiles.

If the regulations about sushi are the same in the UK as they are in the US that fish has gone into a deep freeze for 2 weeks, killing any potential parasites. There is an eensy-weensy risk of listeria if it sits around raw for too long, but not enough that I stopped eating it with this pregnancy (don't buy sushi on Wednesday in Japan, you can check when your local restaurant gets its shipment, and plan accordingly).

Caesar salad was one of the only things that consistently sounded good to me in the first few months of being pregnant, so I just started making it at home from scratch, raw egg and all. Salmonella poisoning is supposedly no different in pregnant women than in non-pregnant women, and shouldn't threaten a pregnancy, and the chance of being exposed to it even with commercial eggs is less than 1 in 10,000 eggs. I've also been thinking that the amount of lemon juice and vinegar in the dressing should be anti-bacterial, and make the dressing safer than say raw yolks in a smoothie.

I can't stand cooking smells in the first 3-4 months of pregnancy either, so deli meat has made a common appearance on my plate. Again this is on the forbidden list because of listeria fears, but I just stick to high quality versions. If you are feeling paranoid you can nuke it for 10 seconds.

I understand the ambivalence thing too. It is well within the range of normal and healthy feelings, it is a life changing rite of passage. Whenever people start asking about how happy I must be, my response usually is, "I will be once the (nausea/swelling/shortness of breath/etc. is over)". I love the middle of pregnancy, the first part you just have to survive, and that is usually when you are telling people, and the last part is when strangers keep trying to feel up your belly like it is community property. Hang in there. There are some cool parts of pregnancy, but I have found it to be far more sentimental and precious to those not actually doing the gestating.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:32 AM

Somewhat off-topic, but as a for-now childless woman planning on changing that in a few years...people do that?? Random people try to touch your stomach?? What do you do in response?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 02, 2012
at 07:55 PM

It only happened maybe 3 or 4 times with the last pregnancy, but yes, random people just walk up and start rubbing your belly. It is weird. I've yet to come up with good response, I just stand there and smile patiently. The belly rubbing isn't as bad as the constant stream of unsolicited advice and worst case scenario stories though. Headphones are not a bad idea when out in public.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 06, 2012
at 10:35 PM

Oh my goodness. All of these paleo babby threads on PH are teaching me things I never knew about pregnancy...

4
8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

on July 31, 2012
at 06:26 PM

I don't know of any risk w/ (cooked) liver...as for the others, all I can say is I know of pregnant women in Japan who eat sushi and pregnant women in France who eat raw milk cheese, as well as pregnant women in our anxiety-ridden cultures who ate suspect foods prior to knowing they were pregnant or without knowing they were supposed to avoid them.

For me, the cost-benefit is whether it's going to make me worry -- stress is no good for pregnancy (or in general). I have some phobias around getting sick, so I've been adhering to the well-cooked guidelines just for my own sanity.

The fear with raw items is foodborne illness, like salmonella and listeria. If you can get your raw items from a reputable source and are quite sure of their lack of contamination, they in themselves won't hurt you.

ETA: poking around on this topic, I came across a heartening article and promptly indulged in some unfried salami: see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2860824/?tool=pubmed

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:33 PM

Raw fish is a very old food, perhaps the new sushi style presentation is new, but it has been in the human diet for a long time. The NIH in the US has given sushi the green light for pregnancy, there was initially a misunderstanding thinking that it was served fresh caught, making it a potential carrier of parasites, but to be legally sold, at least in the states, it has to go into a deep freeze for 2 weeks first, which kills the parasites. If you want it, eat sushi, and enjoy, it is great source of B6, which is important in pregnancy.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:45 PM

Unfortunately listeria does not respect reputation.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 31, 2012
at 08:39 PM

that's totally inaccurate. Fresh caught fish does not need to be frozen to be legally sold in the US.

8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

(2830)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:28 PM

Oh, liver - right, the vitamin A thing.

8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

(2830)

on July 31, 2012
at 10:13 PM

"Food and Drug Administration regulations stipulate that fish to be eaten raw -- whether as sushi, sashimi, seviche, or tartare -- must be frozen first, to kill parasites." http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/08/nyregion/sushi-fresh-from-the-deep-the-deep-freeze.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

E1e798ccd4eed67665652941b9ef7796

(483)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:45 PM

I'm actually less conflicted about liver as info on WAP shows those vitamin A fears are unfounded... Although while I usually love liver I've found it less palatable / appetizing since I got pregnant...

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:45 PM

While I'm not sayin to avoid all raw foods I'd like to clarify that in Japan many many women avoid sushi while pregnant. Also, sushi is a very modern recent food that was absolutely not a part of any traditional Japanese diet. We need to be accurate in our comparisons between cultures.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 17, 2012
at 07:06 PM

@ben you can absolutely buy fresh caught fish, I wasn't saying you couldn't. However, to be sold in a restaurant uncooked the regulations require that it be frozen first. You just have to hope your local restaurant is following the rules, or your buddy who invites you over for a sushi party is aware of the need to freeze it.

3
Bd614f091f0625dea86bad5791471f2d

(775)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:32 PM

Congratulations!

As far as the raw egg yolk in homemade mayo goes, use vinegar to kill harmful bacteria. Here's a little something on that: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1472-765X.1990.tb00085.x/abstract

Plus, I think it's interesting that there is so much talk about the dangers of raw egg yolks, yet people eat fried eggs with runny yolks all the time and live to tell about it.

As far as fish goes, even the FDA says that pregnant women should eat it twice each week. Just be sure to eat oily ocean fish, like salmon, tuna, and sardines, that contain high amounts of selenium. There are many studies that have taken place around the world showing the benefits of eating fish over taking fish oil.

There was someone who had an interview on Underground Wellness from ppnf.org that I wish you would have heard. He offered some detailed information about the dangers of processed dairy and how to choose a safe raw dairy farmer.

3
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:01 PM

My wife ate this stuff:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/49623/how-girl-eat-while-forming-babby#axzz22D6uZNU6

..and we have a beautiful, happy, healthy little 6 month old boy who has been (and still is) exclusively breast fed by mama. Our doctor says he is basically a perfect baby.

The proof is in the pudding... at least for us anyway ;)

E1e798ccd4eed67665652941b9ef7796

(483)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:50 PM

Thanks Jack. That's encouraging. While I'm in denial I'm actually going to have a baby (what on earth would I do with one of those?!?), I'm sure I'd like it to be a perfect one!

2
Dcd6927a3606b66f3bfb1c5c28d67a6f

on July 31, 2012
at 08:57 PM

Yay! Congrats!!! :D I also turned to PaleoHacks when I first found out I was pregnant, so I'm sure you'll get lotsa good support here! :) When I could tolerate it (towards the second half of my pregnancy), I ate ALL of the things on the so-called "forbidden" list that you mentioned. I would have pastured raw egg yolks in my breakfast smoothies, cooked liver, oily fish in the form of sardines and wild-caught salmon, and I practically drank raw milk like it was water! :P Just be sure you trust the sources of your food, and it should be okie-dokey.

E1e798ccd4eed67665652941b9ef7796

(483)

on August 01, 2012
at 08:07 AM

Thanks - that's reassuring

2
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:35 PM

If it helps, think about why the recommendations are made.

Liver: This is due to worries about retinol levels. The evidence for this is pretty scarce when it comes to foods like liver rather than high dose supplements or acne drugs. I would not worry about eating a portion of liver a week.

Raw dairy: This is due to worries about listeria infection which is a real concern although it is a rare problem. I would not recommend raw dairy products when pregnant just as a precaution as you become much more susceptible when pregnant and the effects can be severe. There are other foods that carry just as much of a risk of listeria that may be worth avoiding as a precaution when pregnant. Still there were only 17 cases in pregnant women in the UK in 2010 so it is very rare.

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Listeriosis/Pages/Introduction.aspx

Raw egg: This is due to risk of general food poisoning like salmonella. Again the risk is low but the potential outcome serious. I think raw eggs are less of a risk than they used to be and there are many other sources of food poisoning than just raw eggs such as under-cooked chicken or poor kitchen hygiene etc etc.

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/homehygiene/Pages/Foodpoisoningtips.aspx

Limiting oily fish: This due to worries about the levels of pollutants in the sea and fish now. The NHS recommends two portions of oily fish a week as a compromise between getting omega-3 fat and not getting to much pollutants. Eating smaller fish like sardines and mackerel rather than large fish like tuna can reduce the risk from pollution I think and there are many other sources of pollution in our environment now anyway.

As a personal opinion I would say eat your eggs, dairy, liver and fish. You could be cautious and cook or pasteurise the first two. Eat a portion of liver a week without worry and don't worry about the fish. I'm not sure you gain that much from raw dairy and I think you will get the similar benefits cooked eggs as raw.

Eating a healthy diet of nutrient dense whole foods it likely to be one of the best things you can do. It is probably not worth worrying about all the minor details and potential risks too much.

1
F9013a3c7944d40c983e955f3cc83627

on July 31, 2012
at 11:59 PM

I can only add my personal experience. I drank raw goats milk throughout... we'd milk about a quart a day from Marshmallow, and I would drink at least half. :) But, I can't/shouldn't tell you what you ought to do.

I tried to think mostly about quality when making decisions.

Eg... Japanese women eat sushi all the time when they are pregnant... but perhaps its fresher there? I don't know the answer.

I DO know the quality of the food that I put into MY mouth though.

Do some research into the actual risks that you are taking and decide for yourself whether or not its worth it. And decide whether the quality makes a difference with regard to how risky it is.

:)

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:37 AM

+1 for a goat named "Marshmallow!" Do you find it at all goaty when it's super-fresh? The raw goat's milk I picked up at the store had a distinct aftertaste.

F9013a3c7944d40c983e955f3cc83627

(320)

on August 02, 2012
at 12:24 AM

no.. it had no aftertaste actually. she was fed a diet of alfalfa, and had the opportunity to graze. she didn't smell, but her mate DID. what is hilarious/disgusting is that that goaty taste (like goat cheese) is the same smell as the male's urine. I still have affection for the taste though, despite.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 02, 2012
at 06:06 AM

That's cool...husband has some livestock experience and we were thinking of doing sheep or goats once we settle someplace more permanent. And that is kinda gross. Lol.

1
61a27a8b7ec2264b1821923b271eaf54

(3175)

on July 31, 2012
at 09:59 PM

Choline is very important and found in eggs, seafood, and organ meat...looks like you got it covered, but please read this so it sinks in! Good luck!

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-07-sick-stress-blame-mom-epigenetics.html

The report shows that choline intake that is higher than what is generally recommended during pregnancy may improve how a child responds to stress. These improvements are the result of epigenetic changes that ultimately lead to lower cortisol levels. Epigenetic changes affect how a gene functions, even if the gene itself is not changed. Lowering cortisol is important as high levels of cortisol are linked to a wide range of problems ranging from mental health to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders.

1
6498694060d879a7960b35913539b75f

(1307)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:27 PM

I basically followed WAPF's recommendations except for the grains. I also had two raw egg yolks in a coconut smoothie almost every day. But know your source. My eggs came from free range chickens and were bought directly from the farmer where I buy grass fed beef. I don't think I would do pasteurized eggs raw.

0
65113673de00b0455bae8bc3cebfe0dc

(0)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:28 PM

Hi - definitely check out info on the Brewer diet as well, for another perspective. I followed some of their recommendations, but avoided most refined sugars and starches. I ate a lot of brown rice, sweet potatoes, beets, squash, and other vegetable sources for carbohydrates. It is possible to have a healthy pregnancy and go against some of the conventional wisdom out there. I was very healthy during and after my pregnancy, and my daughter was quite healthy as well. Due to an allergy I developed during pregnancy, I couldn't eat any dairy at all. I got around it by increasing my calcium from other sources (sardines, almonds, kale, etc). The point is that from a nutrient standpoint you can still get what you need, just do some research about it. I do agree with other comments, weigh benefits/risks carefully when it comes to food safety questions. I was pretty cautious, but I know some over easy eggs and tasty homemade mayo were eaten a few times in there. Ultimately, you are the one who has to do what is right for you, after weighing all the possible pros and cons. Good luck!

0
F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

on July 31, 2012
at 05:51 PM

I agree with miked... research for yourself. My best friend followed all of those stupid rules, avoiding EVERYTHING she was told. So what did she eat instead? Practically an entire pizza a day on her own, a package of oreos, ice cream and cake everyday, a crap ton of fruit juice, hotdogs, mass amounts of pasta, etc.

Her baby turned out just fine btw. But what is the trade off by avoiding those specific foods and then consuming mass amounts of SAD crap? I don't see the point.

Moms should just eat healthy, flat out. I don't think you can go wrong just by sticking to paleo during a pregnancy.

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:11 PM

Of course you need to eat healthy. I said the baby was fine, I didn't say the mom was fine. She is absoulutely not fine and completely ruined herself during pregnancy because she said she was pregnant and could eat anything she wanted. Now she's paying for it.

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:09 PM

"Her baby turned out just fine btw. But what is the trade off by avoiding those specific foods and then consuming mass amounts of SAD crap?" Yes, baby might turn out just fine, but the entire thing might take a toll on your health if you don't eat healthy. My daughter is doing paleo pregnancy. She mentioned a website called the paleo baby. www.thepaleobaby.com I know that after two pregnancies with preeclampsia, her blood pressure is the lowest it's been with this one.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:34 PM

That makes zero sense. Avoiding potentially harmful foods doesn't leave you with only crap to eat. You can eat meat, cheese, fruit, veggies. What was your friend's Dr. telling her to avoid, anything healthy? Anything that doesn't come in a box? Sounds like she was making excuses not to eat well while she was pregnant.

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:19 PM

I just think it's dumb... my friend had to avoid practically everything and it left her with crap food to consume. She couldn't enjoy a simple caesar salad because of anchovies, mayo, and unpasteurized cheese. There is so much on the list of foods to avoid and then you will hear otherwise. IMO, I would just follow a paleo diet because of the amount of nutrients for the baby and yourself. I don't think I'll be following all these food guidelines myself.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:58 PM

I see what you're saying. They should tell you to avoid crap too.

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on July 31, 2012
at 10:03 PM

Sleepyhouse22. I wasn't condemning your answer by putting part of it in quotes. Sorry if you thought that. Was emphasizing the trade off. On the other hand you don't have to do all the raw stuff and eat liver etc. to eat healthy during a pregnancy.

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:43 PM

The point is that doctors tell you to avoid all of these things - why not tell women to avoid eating crap instead? Sure, she avoided those things she was told, but she was allowed to eat pizza and entire packages of oreos at a time. Why wasn't that suggested as something not to eat? Doctors need to be nutritionists for women who need assitance in that department.

E1e798ccd4eed67665652941b9ef7796

(483)

on July 31, 2012
at 06:13 PM

I have been researching and the advice is contradictory! And it's not about paleo vs SAD, rather more specifically about the foods I've been told to avoid...

F5be4be097edc85690c12d67ee1a27c0

(1884)

on July 31, 2012
at 07:46 PM

ALSO, since my boyfriend and I were so appalled by this, we started researching the effects of eating poorly during pregnancy and what it does to your child. It was QUITE impressive the toll it takes on your baby's development. Too bad so many moms just don't care.

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