2

votes

What do you use to substitute potatoes as the side dish?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 08, 2010 at 7:53 AM

I've been using pumkin/squash, but I've noticed that it has way too much Vitamin A, which can be unhealthy.

I've also tried substituting it for Sauerkraut, but it doesn't go well with all dishes.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on March 12, 2010
at 02:17 AM

This is what I was going to say. Steak, sauteed zucchini and a salad (for instance) works beautifully. Who needs potatoes?

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 10, 2010
at 10:16 PM

True, but cooked potatoes don't have that problem.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2010
at 09:28 PM

Cooked rutabaga is yummy mashed with potatoes, some butter, and a shake of pepper and nutmeg.

03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on March 10, 2010
at 07:53 PM

Melissa gets the Best Comment Award for "paleo woo." Hehe

Fc7712b6a931b618ffaf4d6475b5d8f4

(200)

on March 10, 2010
at 06:15 PM

well, they are unsafe to consume raw, aren't they?

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 10, 2010
at 04:44 PM

Pumpkin/squash/sweet potatoes do not have retinol, just carotenes. Your body will not convert carotenes to retinoic acid (the active retinoid) unless it needs it. Thus, carotenes are not unhealthy. Beyond the mechanistic understanding I just described, no study has linked dietary carotenes to bad health outcomes. Supplemental carotenes, on the other hand, can lead to more lung cancer among smokers when consumed in high doses along with high doses of retinol, and perhaps only among vit D deficient people too

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 10, 2010
at 04:43 PM

It does not have retinol, just carotenes. Your body will not convert carotenes to retinoic acid (the active retinoid) unless it needs it. Thus, carotenes are not unhealthy. Beyond the mechanistic understanding I just described, no study has linked dietary carotenes to bad health outcomes. Supplemental carotenes, on the other hand, can lead to more lung cancer among smokers when consumed in high doses along with high doses of retinol, and perhaps only among vit D deficient people too.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 09, 2010
at 08:34 AM

I didn't mean to imply that nightshades cause arthritis in everyone, or that it was the only cause or even a major cause. But I have known several people who, when they eliminated nightshades from their diet, were able to cure their arthritis; and if they cheat, it comes back for a couple of months at a time. Plus, I prefer to not ingest nicotine if I don't have to (it's present in all nightshades; tobacco is in that family, too).

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on March 09, 2010
at 03:09 AM

Wild animals can also have arthritis.

Fc7712b6a931b618ffaf4d6475b5d8f4

(200)

on March 09, 2010
at 02:03 AM

Dear god, this pizza crust looks like the best thing in the world!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 08, 2010
at 06:49 PM

Comfort food! Whoever invents a paleo form of legal food sponge (bread) will get rich!

D15d6820ef1545edac65e975cc2d8949

on March 08, 2010
at 05:42 PM

Something to soak up the sauce with! Also, for volume -- I know I overeat if I don't have veggies to my food.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 08, 2010
at 02:33 PM

Arthritis is not a disease of civilization and has been documented in paleolithic peoples. Furthermore, there is no scientific study proving the link between nightshades and arthritis...it's paleo woo. The "studies" that show a link are surveys, which we all know are dumb from Good Calories Bad Calories. I didn't eat nightshades for over a year and I had no reaction adding them back in. IN fact, I feel happier and better since I can eat delicious ethnic food. If we are going to discard all plants with antinutrients, we should only eat meat.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 08, 2010
at 01:43 PM

@Melissa: nightshades can have significant autoimmune effects, including being the sole cause of arthritis in some people. Unfortunately, it can also take up to two months for their effects to completely wear off to the point where you can tell if they bother you (and eating even very small amounts during such a trial period can set the clock back to the beginning).

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 08, 2010
at 01:25 PM

I think the potatoes question depends on what you are doing paleo for. If it's for weight loss, skip the potatoes. I do it for auto immune issues and while yeah...potatoes are a "nightshade" and they have some antinutrients, I've never reacted to them and that would also mean ditching tomatoes and peppers too.

B1b9f0574aa9571f6aec6adb81d43190

(578)

on March 08, 2010
at 11:26 AM

And to compound the questions, I just found this post by Don Matesz on potatoes: http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2009/09/primal-potatoes-part-2.html. So do we even need to skip the potatoes?

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 08, 2010
at 08:43 AM

I subscribe to Kurt Harris' PaNu version of Paleo, where dairy is acceptable. The idea is to duplicate the evolutionary metabolic environment from the Paleo period, not to eat exactly the same foods. Potatoes are a high-carb, insulin-provoking food. Butter is a saturated fat very similar to the animal fats that would have been available in the Paleo period.

Fc7712b6a931b618ffaf4d6475b5d8f4

(200)

on March 08, 2010
at 08:23 AM

Hmm, isn't butter as non-paleo as potatoes?

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10 Answers

best answer

7
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 08, 2010
at 01:29 PM

Honestly, I wouldn't worry about vitamin A from plant sources. Often, the body can't even convert it to the bioavailable form. It's excess retinol that is being blamed around here. If you get enough of that already, your body will probably not convert the stuff in the squash.

But the rule is in general that more orange = more A. Paler squashes have less, as do parsnips compared to carrots.

Otherwise, why not try mushrooms? Or mashed celeriac.

6
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 08, 2010
at 05:08 PM

Everyone is coming up with great side dishes, but I think we sometimes have a problem with old mind-sets. Who says we even need to find a substitute for a side of potatoes? If you must have a white component, what about mashed cauliflower?

This is along the line of my own weird mind set of "healthy whole grains". That phrase was rammed into my head for so long that it is hard to overcome.

A healthier frame of mind would be to just accept the concept of a nice piece of meat accompanied by your personal choice healthy side of veggie as the perfect paleo meal.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 08, 2010
at 06:49 PM

Comfort food! Whoever invents a paleo form of legal food sponge (bread) will get rich!

D15d6820ef1545edac65e975cc2d8949

on March 08, 2010
at 05:42 PM

Something to soak up the sauce with! Also, for volume -- I know I overeat if I don't have veggies to my food.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on March 12, 2010
at 02:17 AM

This is what I was going to say. Steak, sauteed zucchini and a salad (for instance) works beautifully. Who needs potatoes?

Fc7712b6a931b618ffaf4d6475b5d8f4

(200)

on March 09, 2010
at 02:03 AM

Dear god, this pizza crust looks like the best thing in the world!

4
Da9e3c7c4d81dd2c3d84e8b1e0e5cb10

(482)

on March 08, 2010
at 02:25 PM

I agree with Melissa. The problem with too much vitamin A is usually via the preformed kind, not from carotenoids in veggies. That said, one of my fave sides is brussels sprouts. Like Rick, I tilt PaNu so do include some dairy, and brussels sprouts in butter are delish!

One other suggestion: I was watching Food Network and saw a great side I want to try: roasted grape tomatoes (just tomatoes, garlic, and olive oil). They'd probably work just as well pan fried.

4
5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

on March 08, 2010
at 08:09 AM

I like zucchini (courgettes) as a side-dish. If you cook them just right, they can actually have a mashed potato-like texture. Leafy greens like spinach or kale are other favorites, and broccoli or cabbage can also be good. Sometimes I mix in a few sliced onions for variety.

If you're not a big vegetable fan, it's amazing how much better they taste when cooked in lots of butter or cream.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 08, 2010
at 08:43 AM

I subscribe to Kurt Harris' PaNu version of Paleo, where dairy is acceptable. The idea is to duplicate the evolutionary metabolic environment from the Paleo period, not to eat exactly the same foods. Potatoes are a high-carb, insulin-provoking food. Butter is a saturated fat very similar to the animal fats that would have been available in the Paleo period.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on March 09, 2010
at 03:09 AM

Wild animals can also have arthritis.

B1b9f0574aa9571f6aec6adb81d43190

(578)

on March 08, 2010
at 11:26 AM

And to compound the questions, I just found this post by Don Matesz on potatoes: http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2009/09/primal-potatoes-part-2.html. So do we even need to skip the potatoes?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 08, 2010
at 02:33 PM

Arthritis is not a disease of civilization and has been documented in paleolithic peoples. Furthermore, there is no scientific study proving the link between nightshades and arthritis...it's paleo woo. The "studies" that show a link are surveys, which we all know are dumb from Good Calories Bad Calories. I didn't eat nightshades for over a year and I had no reaction adding them back in. IN fact, I feel happier and better since I can eat delicious ethnic food. If we are going to discard all plants with antinutrients, we should only eat meat.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 08, 2010
at 01:25 PM

I think the potatoes question depends on what you are doing paleo for. If it's for weight loss, skip the potatoes. I do it for auto immune issues and while yeah...potatoes are a "nightshade" and they have some antinutrients, I've never reacted to them and that would also mean ditching tomatoes and peppers too.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 08, 2010
at 01:43 PM

@Melissa: nightshades can have significant autoimmune effects, including being the sole cause of arthritis in some people. Unfortunately, it can also take up to two months for their effects to completely wear off to the point where you can tell if they bother you (and eating even very small amounts during such a trial period can set the clock back to the beginning).

Fc7712b6a931b618ffaf4d6475b5d8f4

(200)

on March 08, 2010
at 08:23 AM

Hmm, isn't butter as non-paleo as potatoes?

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 09, 2010
at 08:34 AM

I didn't mean to imply that nightshades cause arthritis in everyone, or that it was the only cause or even a major cause. But I have known several people who, when they eliminated nightshades from their diet, were able to cure their arthritis; and if they cheat, it comes back for a couple of months at a time. Plus, I prefer to not ingest nicotine if I don't have to (it's present in all nightshades; tobacco is in that family, too).

03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on March 10, 2010
at 07:53 PM

Melissa gets the Best Comment Award for "paleo woo." Hehe

3
A80c7d214526e4c4a3a3fe36a7f8b38e

(328)

on March 10, 2010
at 09:21 PM

In my opinion, even better than pureed cauliflower, are pureed turnips, parsnips or rutabega. Or even combining them in some way. Be sure to add butter and/or cream. Yum. These are higher in carbs than cauliflower, but still lower than potatos.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2010
at 09:28 PM

Cooked rutabaga is yummy mashed with potatoes, some butter, and a shake of pepper and nutmeg.

2
15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 10, 2010
at 04:46 PM

Why avoid potatoes? Just because Loren Cordain says they are not paleo does not make them unhealthy.

Fc7712b6a931b618ffaf4d6475b5d8f4

(200)

on March 10, 2010
at 06:15 PM

well, they are unsafe to consume raw, aren't they?

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 10, 2010
at 10:16 PM

True, but cooked potatoes don't have that problem.

1
A1ae6a36ca0f4210882603e1255ea42d

on March 10, 2010
at 09:56 PM

Potatoes are not inherently not paleo IMO -- they are a good source of cals for a hunter-gatherer. They are just not low-carb.

1
245c53790116339bcc79fb789f6f9c9d

(744)

on March 09, 2010
at 02:31 AM

I am a big fan of oven roasted cauliflower for dishes that are traditionally accompanied by potatoes; in my opinion this method gives the closest "mouth feel" to potatoes, and is so delicious that it is completely worth eating in its own right. This recipe is pretty close to what I do, except that I mince the garlic and use half olive oil/half coconut oil. (butter is also awesome here if you eat it)

As variations to garlic, I have also seen it prepared this way with fennel and onions, or Parmesan, or chili and lime, or turmeric jalape??o ginger.

0
89985542ffc00c296552951369fe809a

on May 09, 2010
at 02:16 AM

I've always heard cauliflower as a good sub... hm... what else could be a good paleo sub... celeriac? or how about turnips?

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