1

votes

French fries cooked in olive oil

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 12, 2013 at 12:40 AM

I know this might be ridiculous, but thought I'd ask. A local establishment sells French fries cooked in olive oil. Is this any worse for me than a simple white potato is?

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 13, 2013
at 03:13 PM

Yeah - I've heard it all over too.

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on January 13, 2013
at 03:04 AM

I'm fully willing to admit I could be wrong on that point. I'm just parroting what I've heard on podcasts.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 07:21 PM

I'm not convinced that oxidation of olive oil is such a big concern (especially compared to lard for example), but I did just post a question on it to try to make sure: http://paleohacks.com/questions/172886/frying-and-oxidation

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:56 PM

It depends on the olive oil. Some smoke higher than lard and duck fat, and all of them smoke higher than butter. Not that browned butter is a bad thing...

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:52 PM

When it's cold I get a hankering for fried food. If I do it myself I'm picky about the oil, but otherwise not. The paleo fetish troll doll goes in the glove compartment so it can't watch.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:47 PM

Refined olive oil has a high smoke point, but extra virgin does not. I fried a lot of oysters, clams and fish over the holidays in refined olive oil. There was no smoking and the oil was still clear and light when I poured it off.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:37 PM

And you can ask, too. I've sent more than one server to the kitchen to inquire about what is on/in various dishes.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:53 PM

+1 as well. This particular restaurant doesn't use the fryers for anything else, so cross contamination isn't an issue here even if you are sensitive.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:10 PM

+1. OP isn't proposing to eat them at every meal.

E779d573d64ee55c5a670c951661fdb9

(20)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:04 PM

And thanks for the links

E779d573d64ee55c5a670c951661fdb9

(20)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:03 PM

Yes, Elevation burger.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:56 PM

They aren't dusted. The kitchen is open so you can see them cut the fries, drop them into the fryer and take them out and serve them directly to you.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:55 PM

This is the oil they use http://www.villabertolli.com/product/detail/114776/bertolli-products-classico-olive-oil which is pure olive oil. You can even see the cans on display on some of their locations.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:54 PM

I edited it for you.

E779d573d64ee55c5a670c951661fdb9

(20)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:53 AM

If it means anything to you, all the meat in this place is grass fed free range. Lets just say its an occasional indulgence (ie expensive). They aren't necessarily a paleo restaurant, just trying to figure out how much of the menu I can get away with. Thanks for your response

E779d573d64ee55c5a670c951661fdb9

(20)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:46 AM

The second sentence was obviously not intended to be a question. I am telling you that these are for sale, not asking.

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6 Answers

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3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:00 PM

The other 'answers' for this question... wow, are paleo supposed to be so scared of their own shadow?

Olive oil french fries sound wonderful. Eat them a little skin on them, it won't hurt you. Hell, you're probably not gluten-sensitive (most aren't) so cross contamination isn't probably an issue.

Geez, folks!

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:53 PM

+1 as well. This particular restaurant doesn't use the fryers for anything else, so cross contamination isn't an issue here even if you are sensitive.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:52 PM

When it's cold I get a hankering for fried food. If I do it myself I'm picky about the oil, but otherwise not. The paleo fetish troll doll goes in the glove compartment so it can't watch.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:10 PM

+1. OP isn't proposing to eat them at every meal.

best answer

8
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:53 PM

Olive oil (when refined) does not actually have a low smoke point:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/113142/can-we-put-olive-oil-low-smoke-point-myth-to-bed

Also, I don't believe oxidation when cooking with olive oil is anymore of a concern than oxidation when cooking with lard:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/172886/frying-and-oxidation

Though, eating refined olive oil still may not be ideal (when compared to animal fat):

http://paleohacks.com/questions/169741/extra-light-olive-oil-versus-canola-oil

I personally think it's fine in moderation.

I assume you're talking about Elevation Burger? Their fries are gluten free. They are not dusted with flour and they don't fry anything else in the fryers. Also, they do actually use pure olive oil. This is the actual olive oil they use in all their stores, and you can sometimes see the cans on display:

http://www.villabertolli.com/product/detail/114776/bertolli-products-classico-olive-oil

Note the smoke point of 460F. The kitchen is open and on display so you can see that the olive oil is not smoking in the fryers.

The fries are cut in the store and you can see that they are not peeled first. This could raise some concern over glycoalkaloids which are concentrated in the peal, but such concerns may be overblown due to glycoalkaloids being bred out of common commercial varieties of potatoes:

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2010/09/potatoes-and-human-health-part-ii.html

Here are some other posts with some relevant discussion:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/165116/elevation-burger-paleo-fast-food http://paleohacks.com/questions/64466/100-grass-fed-burger-joint

E779d573d64ee55c5a670c951661fdb9

(20)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:03 PM

Yes, Elevation burger.

E779d573d64ee55c5a670c951661fdb9

(20)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:04 PM

And thanks for the links

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:47 PM

Refined olive oil has a high smoke point, but extra virgin does not. I fried a lot of oysters, clams and fish over the holidays in refined olive oil. There was no smoking and the oil was still clear and light when I poured it off.

4
F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:59 AM

Olive oil oxidizes at a lower temperature than other paleo approved oils/fats. I'd worry about all of the olive oil being oxidized.

I've had some potato chips that the ingredients were potatoes, and olive oil. They don't sit well.

Personally, I wouldn't eat it. But it does seem borderline acceptable as a cheat/treat.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:56 PM

It depends on the olive oil. Some smoke higher than lard and duck fat, and all of them smoke higher than butter. Not that browned butter is a bad thing...

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on January 13, 2013
at 03:04 AM

I'm fully willing to admit I could be wrong on that point. I'm just parroting what I've heard on podcasts.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 07:21 PM

I'm not convinced that oxidation of olive oil is such a big concern (especially compared to lard for example), but I did just post a question on it to try to make sure: http://paleohacks.com/questions/172886/frying-and-oxidation

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 13, 2013
at 03:13 PM

Yeah - I've heard it all over too.

1
3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:49 AM

As long as they don't fry breaded food in there too (e.g. breaded chicken), and as long as you don't eat the skin of potatoes (that's where the toxins are), go for it. Although remember, most olive oil is not even real olive oil anymore, it's bastardized with vegetable oils. Given how restaurants are buying cheap oils, their olive oil has very few chances of being "real".

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:55 PM

This is the oil they use http://www.villabertolli.com/product/detail/114776/bertolli-products-classico-olive-oil which is pure olive oil. You can even see the cans on display on some of their locations.

E779d573d64ee55c5a670c951661fdb9

(20)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:53 AM

If it means anything to you, all the meat in this place is grass fed free range. Lets just say its an occasional indulgence (ie expensive). They aren't necessarily a paleo restaurant, just trying to figure out how much of the menu I can get away with. Thanks for your response

0
23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

on January 13, 2013
at 08:20 PM

You may find this article interesting - it seems the underlying acrylamide issues with potato cooked at high temperatures remain - even when cooked in "better" oils, non-cross-contaminated environments, etc.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/04/16/are-new-healthier-potato-chips-really-any-better-for-you.aspx

Instead of dreaming of magic health-giving paleo fries (of which there aren't really any) try a once-in-a-while treat of some fresh, organic, baby new potatoes, rubbed clean of their soft peel and cooked lightly (eg. steamed) - then liberally doused in butter and/or bacon grease. Nom.

If you insist on having fried potato however - I recommend frying them in a mix of duck fat and bacon grease for both culinary and high smoke point/anti-oxidative reasons.

All the best :)

0
A31b063c5866c08aa9968a8f2f1e9949

(1721)

on January 12, 2013
at 11:29 AM

I would be very careful that they are not dusted with flour prior to being fried. I read that many commercially prepared french fries are (so that they are crispier)--don't know if that would be the case at a fancy restaurant.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:37 PM

And you can ask, too. I've sent more than one server to the kitchen to inquire about what is on/in various dishes.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 12, 2013
at 12:56 PM

They aren't dusted. The kitchen is open so you can see them cut the fries, drop them into the fryer and take them out and serve them directly to you.

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