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Cooked/Cooled/Reheated Potatoes & Resistant Starch?

Commented on May 25, 2014
Created May 22, 2014 at 12:00 PM

If you cook/cool/reheat white potatoes does the resistant starch stay intact?

Does it matter how you reheat them? Oven/fry/microwave?

Cheers

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on May 25, 2014
at 07:21 AM

Cold or hot potatoes both give me high blood sugar symptoms. I'd bet that a green banana would be better than a spotted one but not too bothered to try, RS probably just the latest 'thing' I get loads of butyric aid from fibre and butter oil, I think you can even have too much as sometimes my hands smell of vomit!

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on May 25, 2014
at 07:20 AM

Interesting, I don't notice any difference eating hot or cold potatoes

Medium avatar

(10601)

on May 24, 2014
at 07:42 PM

Here's some more fodder for the discussion, in the broader sense whether resistant starch affects blood glucose and insulin levels. It's not that clear...

http://caloriesproper.com/?p=4121

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 24, 2014
at 12:19 AM

Or how about just eating real unprocessed foods where resistant starch comes from?

141c6b3d5e9506dd93881e3f9737f297

(55)

on May 23, 2014
at 11:15 PM

...tho i have now followed up on the 'google search' in the answer by @daz, & going by that, it looks like the RS will decrease a bit whilst the food is still hot, but will rise again as it cools.

141c6b3d5e9506dd93881e3f9737f297

(55)

on May 23, 2014
at 11:12 PM

thanks cheval. no i did not read the article. i just went off what you pasted in your answer.

i have recently been trying to find studies on the subject without much luck. the studies i have seen only tested after the food was cooled, such as this one.

Medium avatar

(0)

on May 23, 2014
at 04:23 PM

The post speaks for itself! Richard is not eating cold potatoes. Did you read the article? He says : The potatoes were chilled in the fridge overnight, then I peeled them, chopped them into cubes and fried them in Red Palm Oil.

141c6b3d5e9506dd93881e3f9737f297

(55)

on May 23, 2014
at 12:37 PM

"no (do not need to cool). reheating rice, beans and potatoes does not harm the RS3, in fact, it increases it by driving more water out of the retrograded structure"

I would like to see a ref that backs up that comment by Richard

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on May 23, 2014
at 01:57 AM

not quite true. Even potatoes straight out of the oven have some RS. Eating them cold decreases the palatability and more or less doubles or triples the RS. If you want RS but like hot food, eat beans.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 22, 2014
at 11:20 PM

"...So you don’t have to eat it cold..." i'm not sure if Mark is correct on this point...tho i do no have any definitive refs. I always thought that the food (ie potatoes) had to be cooled for the the RS to 're-form' even when it goes thru multiple heat cycles.

the closest ref i have is this one; Studies on effect of multiple heating/cooling cycles on the resistant starch formation in cereals, legumes and tubers

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on May 22, 2014
at 06:28 PM

How much is converted, as the MDA rs thread seems to think it is maintained through reheating. ( assuming I read correctly )

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 22, 2014
at 04:35 PM

Any cooking process converts resistant starch to digestible starch, doesn't matter if it is retrograde RS or native RS.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on May 22, 2014
at 04:33 PM

I don't think so, but I'm no expect.

Apparently you can heat/cool them several times for more RS, each time you reheat the rs you created is not destroyed. ( IIRC )

Check the MDA RS thread

0094a53b26cab5e73a9a9d474c89deec

on May 22, 2014
at 04:29 PM

Yes. You eat them cold, or I believe the starch is converted to sugar instead as it's digesting. I've noticed positive differences in my digestion and GERD since I've introduced cooled/cold resistant starch in the form of potatoes in my diet.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on May 22, 2014
at 03:44 PM

Looks like Mark Sisson says that you retain the RS when reheating

"Retrograded RS (cooked and cooled) is maintained during subsequent heating. You can even heat it and cool it once again to create even more RS. So you don’t have to eat it cold, though I would advise against re-heating a cooked and cooled RS source into oblivion. Keep the heat relatively low." Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/resistant-starch-your-questions-answered/#ixzz32SYV6c00

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on May 22, 2014
at 01:43 PM

So if you've cooked them, cooled them to form resistant starch, but then reheated again you lose the resistant starch? You have to eat them cold?

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8 Answers

0
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on May 24, 2014
at 11:53 AM

thoroughly confused

0
Medium avatar

(10601)

on May 24, 2014
at 11:13 AM

Resistant starch is uncooked starch. Commercial dried precooked starch is called pregel, and it has the same working properties as freshly cooked starch. I would expect the same holds for food starches. The process of rupturing the starch cellules to release the free molecules isn'r reversible. It doesn't matter much how much you cool it, starch is not going to revert back to its uncooked state.

For example, a potato chip's calories do not change significantly if eaten frozen. Why would any other cooled starch be any different? The only significant shift would result from undercooking the starch in the first place.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on May 25, 2014
at 07:20 AM

Interesting, I don't notice any difference eating hot or cold potatoes

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on May 23, 2014
at 04:41 PM

Nickoley has said that heating to about 130* F will not degrade the retrograde starch. I have been making "fried rice" for lunch--stir fried veggies and some protein with about 1/2 cup of already cooled rice added at the end. I make the fried rice and return it to the fridge to take to work the next day where I reheat it in the microwave until it's warm but not hot.

This seems OK. My pp blood sugars don't go above the 90's and the Ketonix breath meter stays in the yellow (moderate) or red (high) ranges. I do use plenty of coconut oil in my stir fries.

0
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on May 23, 2014
at 11:43 AM

cheval and daz seem to offer conflicting info... I have no idea, but want to know. Seems to depend on whom you ask.

0
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 23, 2014
at 09:53 AM

If you cook/cool/reheat white potatoes does the resistant starch stay intact?

It would seem that reheating cold cooked potatoes will reduce the RS3 (retrograded resistant starch) content slightly compared to their cold state. for refs google; "retrogradation is partly reversible" potato

(but the RS3 will increase again if allowed to cool)

0
Medium avatar

on May 23, 2014
at 06:03 AM

Apparently you can reheat your potatoes and still get the RS. Same for rice and beans. That's what Richard Nikoley says (FreeTheAnimal). Check this post and the comments : http://freetheanimal.com/2014/03/breakfast-potatoes-sensitivity.html

-----

Sally: When you reheated the potatoes in red palm oil, was it necessary to let them cool again to have the RS benefit?
Richard Nikoley: Sally, no. reheating rice, beans and potatoes does not harm the RS3, in fact, it increases it by driving more water out of the retrograded structure.

141c6b3d5e9506dd93881e3f9737f297

(55)

on May 23, 2014
at 12:37 PM

"no (do not need to cool). reheating rice, beans and potatoes does not harm the RS3, in fact, it increases it by driving more water out of the retrograded structure"

I would like to see a ref that backs up that comment by Richard

0
Af679502f1e31c0c59c79bd08f324b35

on May 23, 2014
at 03:26 AM

Just eat potato starch?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 24, 2014
at 12:19 AM

Or how about just eating real unprocessed foods where resistant starch comes from?

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 22, 2014
at 01:24 PM

Conversion of resistant to digestible starch is a chemical process… doesn't really matter what source of heat you use to accomplish it, all are effective.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on May 22, 2014
at 01:43 PM

So if you've cooked them, cooled them to form resistant starch, but then reheated again you lose the resistant starch? You have to eat them cold?

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