1

votes

Anyone else ferment potatoes?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 28, 2012 at 5:31 PM

Tried it with some regular white russet potatoes. Cooked it until it was soft enough to mash, then I added some culture from my kefir, mixed it up well and left it out for 5-7 days. Takes really long to ferment to an acceptable level (and even then, I could have left it fermenting a bit longer.) It didn't even start really fermenting until about the 3rd day, which is 2 days later than fermenting pretty much everything else I've tried. I had to take it out eventually before I accidentally made my own vodka.

Anyone ever fermented potatoes? How about sweet potatoes?

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 08, 2013
at 03:52 AM

Sympathies -- I've (often wildly) succeeded at every other fermentation project but could never get tubers going.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 29, 2012
at 05:10 AM

I love them with sour cream and onion chives. My savory and sour taste buds orgasm.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on August 29, 2012
at 04:06 AM

My gluten free homemade beer takes offense! And I've got a still in the works...

Ee70ee808f748374744404a00e1c22ed

(1163)

on August 28, 2012
at 09:23 PM

^I beg to differ! Homebrew is awesome. Also, (Fun Fact!) vodka has to come out of the still at 95% alcohol minimum in order to legally be called vodka.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 28, 2012
at 08:12 PM

And homebrew alcohol is gross.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 28, 2012
at 08:01 PM

Only if you use a yeast culture in your starter and ferment it for a long time. And you won't make significant amounts of alcohol without something to distill it. But by that logic, EVERY ferment is a spirit. Beet kvass and sauerkraut does not = beet vodka or cabbage vodak.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on August 28, 2012
at 05:51 PM

LOL. How about fermented gnocchi? I have tried fermented green tomatoes, apples, watermelon, cranberry, cloudberry, garlic, ramson, fern, but not potatoes. I had raw potato juice though.

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5 Answers

2
0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on August 28, 2012
at 11:09 PM

I started fermenting my potatoes after reading about it in Paleo Magazine a couple month back. Supposedly, this is the traditional way to prepare potaotes and sweet potatoes, and it's supposed to make them more digestable.

I peel and dice the potatoes, and soak them in a salt brine with a few tablespoons of whey added for 2-3 days. Since I then cook the potatoes in the oven, I doubt there's much in the way of beneficial bacteria left, but I'm hooked on the slightly soured potato taste - it's really great! We frequently eat them with lacto-fermented ketchup, so we get our probiotic fix. :)

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 29, 2012
at 05:10 AM

I love them with sour cream and onion chives. My savory and sour taste buds orgasm.

0
2ebc73adbf41f4c70d7922e503684946

(10)

on July 23, 2013
at 09:00 PM

I'm currently fermenting sweet potatoes and it's great. My current fermenting method isn't entirely methodical, but it yields good results and is easy. I have a large mason jar which I fill with salted, sliced up veggies. I wait for the brine to form, then add water and brine from the prior ferment to "seed". I use olive oil to "seal" the top (let CO2 out, no O2 in) and put cheezecloth over it. When I get about half way through eating the jar, I add new veg to the bottom. Right now I have two half/half jars of kale/carrots/onions on top and effectively fermented and cubed sweet potatoes below that are only slightly fermented but already very palatable raw. I think of sweet potatoes in a ferment acting quite a bit like carrots. They seem to get a little rubbery and my inclination is to chop them pretty fine. I've never tried fermenting them cooked.

I can't imagine this method applies to potatoes though because of the alkaloids. I have heard of fermenting them and then cooking, however, which yields a sort of mashed potato.

0
B6c16d850e7305aad0507ad079ecf1d4

(232)

on February 07, 2013
at 09:28 PM

I have tried to ferment sweet potatoes, I left them cooked and mashed in a sterile air-tight container on the pilot light of my stove. Two days and they taste exactly the same :(

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 08, 2013
at 03:52 AM

Sympathies -- I've (often wildly) succeeded at every other fermentation project but could never get tubers going.

0
A3ff262a2686d79789e09a26013901b3

on August 28, 2012
at 07:34 PM

Isn't that Voldka? LOL

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 28, 2012
at 08:12 PM

And homebrew alcohol is gross.

Ee70ee808f748374744404a00e1c22ed

(1163)

on August 28, 2012
at 09:23 PM

^I beg to differ! Homebrew is awesome. Also, (Fun Fact!) vodka has to come out of the still at 95% alcohol minimum in order to legally be called vodka.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on August 29, 2012
at 04:06 AM

My gluten free homemade beer takes offense! And I've got a still in the works...

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 28, 2012
at 08:01 PM

Only if you use a yeast culture in your starter and ferment it for a long time. And you won't make significant amounts of alcohol without something to distill it. But by that logic, EVERY ferment is a spirit. Beet kvass and sauerkraut does not = beet vodka or cabbage vodak.

0
2336245491a87ee15d4fb8f8f8283909

(1173)

on August 28, 2012
at 07:28 PM

I've thought about it but never tried it. To get them going faster, add them to sauerkraut.

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