3

votes

Potatoes: Eat the skin, or no?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 08, 2010 at 11:44 PM

That is the question.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 26, 2011
at 02:05 PM

Most of the pesticides are in the skin according to studies and every single conventional batch of potatoes I've ever gotten has gone bad pretty fast(turned green/sprouted). Conventional potatoes do have a funky taste when compared to organic though in my experience.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on December 26, 2011
at 10:37 AM

The white potatoes I buy here in the UK sprout easily - if I leave them in my veg cupboard and forget them, they have long tentacle things which come out to meet me when I open the cupboard door.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on December 26, 2011
at 05:00 AM

I don't know whose Paleo he owes his allegiance to, but many people do eat potatoes, dairy, and evenn some legumes. As for salt, the argument could be made in favor of Celtic salt and sea salt, which are minimally processed, as opposed to processed, iodized salt.

55a8a56cd6db64fd9ed54b5ca1befdd2

(10)

on December 20, 2011
at 05:08 PM

In Cordain's newest book, he mentions WHITE potatoes are no good, but other tubers/ground vegetables are fine. Such as sweet potatoes or yams.

0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on July 08, 2011
at 08:54 PM

As I recall, we were mostly advised to eat the skin as a good source of fiber. But I agree that it borders on comical how much lousy guidance we've been given, under the label of healthy advice. For my part, I always enjoyed the skins -- the flavor and the texture. Have pretty much stopped eating white potatoes on all but rare occasions -- but I do regularly eat sweet potatoes, skin and all. Seems I recall reading somewhere (Daily Apple maybe? can't remember) that sweet potato skins were contained much lower levels of anti-nutrients. Would be great if someone could confirm!

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 16, 2010
at 11:52 PM

Melissa, polyphenols in tea will reduce the absorption of some minerals including iron.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 16, 2010
at 11:50 PM

Also from comments on the same series: most of the alkaloids are in the skin (that is the main anti-nutrient to be concerned about) http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2009/09/primal-potatoes-part-2.html?showComment=1252011858291#c8434935660841784309

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 10, 2010
at 04:16 PM

Funny you say that because tea does affect the absorption of minerals. Also, phytic acid has shown anti-cancer properties in animal studies and human case-studies.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 09, 2010
at 11:35 PM

All kinds of things are "anti cancer" in vitro...but haven't been proved in humans. I will stick with things that don't affect the absorption of nutrients in my meals like afternoon green tea or a couple of nuts as a snack.

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 09, 2010
at 10:53 PM

By anti-nutrient, I suppose you mean phytic acid? Turns out phytic acid may have tremendous anti-cancer properties. See http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/133/11/3778S

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on March 09, 2010
at 09:51 PM

A fair number of people in the paleo universe eat potatoes (and/or rice) occasionally. There's some evidence showing paleolithic consumption of starchy tubers. Some eat dairy as well -- I suspect most of us at least eat butter. As for giving up salt... I don't know too many folks who make that choice, though it's worth noting that by giving up processed foods, you give up a LOT of salt.

33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 09, 2010
at 07:23 PM

great question, I am confused with this one too.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 09, 2010
at 03:25 AM

I've always thought that there are the most nutrients just under the skin.

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on March 09, 2010
at 01:07 AM

I'm guessing this is true of sweet potatoes as well, then?

52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on March 09, 2010
at 12:03 AM

I peel them, shred them, and fry them in butter or bacon fat a few times a month. Top with a few fried eggs and enjoy.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 08, 2010
at 11:55 PM

Agreed! My old stepdad used to love baking potatoes in the wood campfire. The outside looked like crap but the middle was awesome with a big dollop of butter!

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7 Answers

6
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 08, 2010
at 11:52 PM

http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2009/09/primal-potatoes-part-2.html "The skin of Potatoes would not be eaten by paleolithic ancestors as it would be burnt when cooking in the ashes."

It's also where almost all the antinutrients are. Get your nutrients from meat and use the potatoes to soak up the fat. Don't worry about the nutrients in the skin because there are antinutrients there too and they are less bioavailable than those in the meat anyway.

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on March 09, 2010
at 01:07 AM

I'm guessing this is true of sweet potatoes as well, then?

52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on March 09, 2010
at 12:03 AM

I peel them, shred them, and fry them in butter or bacon fat a few times a month. Top with a few fried eggs and enjoy.

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 09, 2010
at 10:53 PM

By anti-nutrient, I suppose you mean phytic acid? Turns out phytic acid may have tremendous anti-cancer properties. See http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/133/11/3778S

15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 10, 2010
at 04:16 PM

Funny you say that because tea does affect the absorption of minerals. Also, phytic acid has shown anti-cancer properties in animal studies and human case-studies.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 08, 2010
at 11:55 PM

Agreed! My old stepdad used to love baking potatoes in the wood campfire. The outside looked like crap but the middle was awesome with a big dollop of butter!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 09, 2010
at 11:35 PM

All kinds of things are "anti cancer" in vitro...but haven't been proved in humans. I will stick with things that don't affect the absorption of nutrients in my meals like afternoon green tea or a couple of nuts as a snack.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 16, 2010
at 11:50 PM

Also from comments on the same series: most of the alkaloids are in the skin (that is the main anti-nutrient to be concerned about) http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2009/09/primal-potatoes-part-2.html?showComment=1252011858291#c8434935660841784309

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 16, 2010
at 11:52 PM

Melissa, polyphenols in tea will reduce the absorption of some minerals including iron.

5
15d23403fb836f2b506f4f3ad2c03356

(1219)

on March 09, 2010
at 10:56 PM

I don't see anything wrong with eating the skin. I also don't subscribe to the theory that phytic acid is bad. I think it is healthy to have it, providing you occasionally eat some high mineral meals without it. See http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/133/11/3778S

I eat skinless steamed potatoes most of the time, but eat the skin occasionally, especially when roasting the potatoe. I always eat the skin of purple potatoes cause that's where most of the anthocyanins are.

4
F8c63410ad2ade1978775862befb95ff

on March 09, 2010
at 07:52 AM

According to this article, potatoes are not part of the paleo diet at all:

The essentials of the Paleolithic Diet are:

Eat none of the following:

?? Grains- including bread, pasta, noodles

?? Beans- including string beans, kidney beans, lentils, peanuts, snow-peas and peas

?? Potatoes

?? Dairy products

?? Sugar

?? Salt

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on March 09, 2010
at 09:51 PM

A fair number of people in the paleo universe eat potatoes (and/or rice) occasionally. There's some evidence showing paleolithic consumption of starchy tubers. Some eat dairy as well -- I suspect most of us at least eat butter. As for giving up salt... I don't know too many folks who make that choice, though it's worth noting that by giving up processed foods, you give up a LOT of salt.

55a8a56cd6db64fd9ed54b5ca1befdd2

(10)

on December 20, 2011
at 05:08 PM

In Cordain's newest book, he mentions WHITE potatoes are no good, but other tubers/ground vegetables are fine. Such as sweet potatoes or yams.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on December 26, 2011
at 05:00 AM

I don't know whose Paleo he owes his allegiance to, but many people do eat potatoes, dairy, and evenn some legumes. As for salt, the argument could be made in favor of Celtic salt and sea salt, which are minimally processed, as opposed to processed, iodized salt.

3
Fcaeaac15cf6568f2825b230731d5a7d

(529)

on March 09, 2010
at 12:47 AM

The skin is likely the best place for the potato to put up a fight. All those carbs that the plant stored up so that it could grow the following season need to be protected. It makes sense for the skin to be full of harmful substances.

Pretty odd that we have always been told to eat the skin. Funny how conventional wisdom is often not just wrong, but harmful.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 09, 2010
at 03:25 AM

I've always thought that there are the most nutrients just under the skin.

0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on July 08, 2011
at 08:54 PM

As I recall, we were mostly advised to eat the skin as a good source of fiber. But I agree that it borders on comical how much lousy guidance we've been given, under the label of healthy advice. For my part, I always enjoyed the skins -- the flavor and the texture. Have pretty much stopped eating white potatoes on all but rare occasions -- but I do regularly eat sweet potatoes, skin and all. Seems I recall reading somewhere (Daily Apple maybe? can't remember) that sweet potato skins were contained much lower levels of anti-nutrients. Would be great if someone could confirm!

1
3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

on December 26, 2011
at 05:25 AM

I would not eat any unpeeled potatoes unless they're organic. Even then, I'm not so sure since some are sprayed with "organic" pesticides and herbicides. See my post regarding the degree to which non-organic potatoes are sprayed to avoid sprouting.

Ever wonder how potatoes do not seem to spoil? I've eaten some potatoes that I kept in my fridge for longer than 6 months; apparently, this long shelf life is due to pesticides and herbicides.

I now eat all my yams and sweet potatoes peeled. I don't eat potatoes anymore since they're nightshades. But even if I were to bring them back, it would only be organic potatoes.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 26, 2011
at 02:05 PM

Most of the pesticides are in the skin according to studies and every single conventional batch of potatoes I've ever gotten has gone bad pretty fast(turned green/sprouted). Conventional potatoes do have a funky taste when compared to organic though in my experience.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on December 26, 2011
at 10:37 AM

The white potatoes I buy here in the UK sprout easily - if I leave them in my veg cupboard and forget them, they have long tentacle things which come out to meet me when I open the cupboard door.

1
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on December 26, 2011
at 01:40 AM

Any potato I eat (yam, white, purple, whatever) gets extra crunchy skin, I love it. Slap some extra Kerrygold and sea salt in there, roll it up and eat it with yer fingers. Yum.

1
492ebe6681773ef79417d27445d441b7

(30)

on December 26, 2011
at 01:30 AM

If I like it and my body responds well to it, I eat it.

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