0

votes

Fixing food allergies?

Commented on April 23, 2014
Created April 14, 2014 at 11:26 PM

I've heard you can help things like lactose intolerance by consuming fermented dairy products. Peanuts by slowly increasing from a small amount each day...ect.

Is there any way to do this for say potatoes if one was sensitive to potato toxins?

Also any other allergies you can reverse I'd love to hear about. ( Eggs maybe. )

0094a53b26cab5e73a9a9d474c89deec

on April 23, 2014
at 02:49 PM

If you have THAT many food allergies, look into yeast overgrowth/candida and leaky gut. It's probably what's causing you distress

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 23, 2014
at 01:49 PM

I'm not really sure how I would eat if I cut out every possible allergen, especially for months. Ironically enough I've started eating yogurt for the probiotics - I've heard pill from may not be viable - even though dairy is itself a possible allergen. >.<

Kresser is doing a podcast or something in few days on the gut, I'll probably watch that.

0094a53b26cab5e73a9a9d474c89deec

on April 23, 2014
at 02:17 AM

A few months. I cut every allergen out, but then was on heavy doses of antibiotics and my allergies worsened. Once I started healing my gut, my symptoms began to disappear. You have to be diligent about healing your gut, though. Cut out every allergen and gut irritant that bothers you, start on probiotics and supplements and balanced eating, and you'll see improvements.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 22, 2014
at 11:39 PM

I was under the impression that copper deficiency is quite rare and the opposite is usually true? ( Zinc deficiency, not exactly opposite I guess... )

I tried supplementing copper at one point - with zinc - and didn't notice or recall anything. ( Now my diet provides sufficient copper, unless deficiencies are difficult to reverse? )

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 22, 2014
at 03:35 PM

How long did it take you to clear up your sensetivities?

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 18, 2014
at 02:55 PM

Skin alone:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2555/2

Potato with:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2903/2

Potato without:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2904/2

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 18, 2014
at 02:55 PM

Still not really sure what you are arguing. It's not really debatable that the most nutrient dense part of most vegetables is the skin...it just is...sorry.

In the case of potatoes specifically the skin is the most nutrient dense part...again, sorry, it just is. If you look at the links from the site you provided you can see these results...just look...I'm not sure what we're even arguing about?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 18, 2014
at 02:47 PM

The link you provided compares Potatoes, au gratin, dry mix, prepared with water, whole milk and butter with Potatoes, au gratin, dry mix, unprepared for its' first and second links under References. The entire article's content is dependent on these two sources which are not at all related to the point she is making. This makes me think she literally just made the contents of that article up.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 18, 2014
at 02:42 PM

Copy and paste fail, here is the correct comparison link: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2557/2 . You'll see that the differences are in protein, fiber and the 3 minerals mentioned above (less desirable minerals imo). The citation you provided is comparing Potato dry mix prepared with whole milk and butter with potato dry mix unprepared. Which is why I was implying you have an unreliable source.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 18, 2014
at 02:18 PM

Not sure what this is supposed to mean...seems aggressive in tone though.

Are you comparing skinless potatoes to skinless potatoes and seeing no difference? Maybe you should look up the correct comparison and compare skinless potatoes to potatoes with the skin...the nutrition is quite different.

/facepalm

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 18, 2014
at 01:36 PM

Lol, here's a real source: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2908/2 , http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2908/2 . Enjoy your glycoalkaloid rich potato skins with their ample iron, copper and manganese.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 18, 2014
at 01:10 PM

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/skin-potato-really-vitamins-5378.html

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 18, 2014
at 01:08 PM

Got it second or third hand, not sure where the idea is from, or if it's true or not. I think chris kresser may have said something about fermented dairy being able to help the lactose intolerant, not sure if he said anything about innate abilities to digest it though.

Also for example I heard they did a study on slowly introducing peanuts to children who were allergic to them to improve their tolerance, eggs allergies going away after gut heals or by cooking the whites to remove whatever antinutrient is in them.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on April 18, 2014
at 06:41 AM

afaik (or google knows), all(?) infants have the ability to digest milk (have the lactase enzyme), but not all adults do. adults that keep the ability to digest milk have lactase persistence (lucky for me, i do)

Medium avatar

(96)

on April 18, 2014
at 05:15 AM

Did you get this idea from Art Ayers? Because its most likely a load of bs.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 18, 2014
at 02:29 AM

Which nutrients are you referring to? Not vitamin C, potassium or magnesium. Maybe you're referring to fiber?

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 17, 2014
at 11:22 PM

Unfortunatly that is also where most of the nutrients are.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 17, 2014
at 10:28 PM

If you have reason to believe you have some sort of potato allergy then something I'd consider is peeling the potatoes. Most of the glycoalkaloids are in the skin.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 17, 2014
at 10:15 PM

Lol ;p

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 17, 2014
at 10:12 PM

Lmao at that sneaky mod edit. >.<

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 17, 2014
at 09:37 PM

How dare you set off my reply alert for this!

/Plotsyoursuccess

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 15, 2014
at 03:39 PM

Well, for example:

My understanding of lactose intolerance - which might very well be wrong - is that nobody can actually digest lactose and so the only difference between people who are or are not lactose intolerant is their gut biome and if they have the proper bacteria to digest the lactose.

So if you take that as a given then ingesting fermented dairy which would most likely have bacteria which can digest the lactose may act as a probiotic, placing those bacteria in your gut and over time letting them build to significant numbers where you can digest normal diary without issue.

  • 7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

    asked by

    (300)
  • Views
    2K
  • Last Activity
    1545D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

0
Medium avatar

on April 22, 2014
at 11:28 PM

Histamine issues may arise as a result of a copper deficiency due to the downregulation of diamine oxidase.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 22, 2014
at 11:39 PM

I was under the impression that copper deficiency is quite rare and the opposite is usually true? ( Zinc deficiency, not exactly opposite I guess... )

I tried supplementing copper at one point - with zinc - and didn't notice or recall anything. ( Now my diet provides sufficient copper, unless deficiencies are difficult to reverse? )

0
0094a53b26cab5e73a9a9d474c89deec

on April 22, 2014
at 02:56 PM

It would depend on why you have the allergies, I would think. I was diagnosed with blood sensitivities to wheat, dairy, tree nuts, peanuts, seeds, eggs, etc, and have almost entirely reversed them by healing my gut. A healthy gut = healthy body. Invest in some good probiotics, vitamin c and d, l-glutamine, b vitamins, digestive enzymes, betaine hcl, etc. Eat fermented veggies, practice moderation, get enough sleep, etc etc. My problem stemmed from yeast overgrowth, which I've been rectifying with antifungals on top of the supplements. Not sure if that's what your issues stem from, though. Food allergies are almost always a response to an underlying problem; however, I've heard that going paleo can sometimes result in egg sensitivities, especially if they're non-organic, so make sure they're antibiotic free, free range, organic eggs. Typically the egg yolk is much more tolerated than the whites, too. Good luck!

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 22, 2014
at 03:35 PM

How long did it take you to clear up your sensetivities?

0
3e710fab7063494ce6010566704764ed

on April 17, 2014
at 11:59 PM

sometimes an allergy is actually caused by something else (e.g. gluten intolerance causing leaky gut thereby allowing undigested peptides from other foods into your blood stream)...try a "gut healing" protocol (e.g. eliminating allergic foods + probiotics) and THEN introducing the formerly allergic foods

0
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 17, 2014
at 09:36 PM

Benadryl is good to take if you have a severe allergic reaction to a food. Maybe it would also be good for minor allergic reactions? Who knows.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 17, 2014
at 09:37 PM

How dare you set off my reply alert for this!

/Plotsyoursuccess

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 17, 2014
at 10:28 PM

If you have reason to believe you have some sort of potato allergy then something I'd consider is peeling the potatoes. Most of the glycoalkaloids are in the skin.

0
B5fb873f94766774e49a6f9d533a3223

on April 15, 2014
at 03:25 PM

I don't know if you are "helping" lactose intolerance by eating fermented dairy; you are really just consuming far less lactose since it has been consumed by the live cultures. Lactose intolerant individuals don't code for the lactase enzyme that cleaves lactose into glucose and galactose, so it is really impossible for them to digest the sugar.

With food allergies i highly doubt introducing a certain food will help, since your body has made antibodies to fight said food. I actually think the more you ate the worse your allergy/sensitivity would become.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 15, 2014
at 03:39 PM

Well, for example:

My understanding of lactose intolerance - which might very well be wrong - is that nobody can actually digest lactose and so the only difference between people who are or are not lactose intolerant is their gut biome and if they have the proper bacteria to digest the lactose.

So if you take that as a given then ingesting fermented dairy which would most likely have bacteria which can digest the lactose may act as a probiotic, placing those bacteria in your gut and over time letting them build to significant numbers where you can digest normal diary without issue.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!