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Should I be worried about elevated levels of Potassium in my blood?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 25, 2011 at 5:08 PM

Should I be worried about elevated levels of Potassium in my blood?

My doctor is worried and wants to do more blood-work to double check.

It was a bit of surprise. I don't eat bananas or tomatoes, plenty of spinach though.

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on April 27, 2011
at 06:23 AM

I'm not on any drug. I will be doing a re-testing the day after tomorrow.

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 26, 2011
at 06:55 PM

No, K is the chemical symbol for potassium, just as Na is for sodium, Cl for chlorine, etc. and much shorter to write.

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on April 26, 2011
at 04:30 AM

Do you mean vitamin K? I guess I eat a lot of eggs, and was supplementing with vitamin for a bit...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 26, 2011
at 12:27 AM

Yes, but I was told that it's one of the labs that commonly is wrong. I once had high potassium but on further retests, it turns out that the original test was faulty.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on April 25, 2011
at 08:09 PM

YES, follow up with your doctor

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3 Answers

best answer

1
E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 25, 2011
at 05:34 PM

Are you on a blood pressure drug like Lisinopril, Enalapril or any other -pril? It can concentrate K in the blood. Any of us who take those need to avoid the "lite salt" because it's half potassium (KCl instead of NaCl), and also sports drinks because those electrolytes can be full of K. And yes, you do want to be concerned as this can have very serious health effects including death. Also, watch out for sodium-free carbonated beverages (I like club soda or seltzer with a splash of something every now and then) because they also use K to replace the Na, although there probably isn't much per bottle. As for foods, I had no idea potatoes were high in K, but not sure foods pose nearly as high of a risk as the other things I mentioned do.

I'm on Enalapril, so I've had concerns about this myself. Gues I need to get that bloodwork taken care of. I haven't found any natural ways to reduce the K in blood, so hopefully someone here will have some ideas.

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on April 26, 2011
at 04:30 AM

Do you mean vitamin K? I guess I eat a lot of eggs, and was supplementing with vitamin for a bit...

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on April 27, 2011
at 06:23 AM

I'm not on any drug. I will be doing a re-testing the day after tomorrow.

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 26, 2011
at 06:55 PM

No, K is the chemical symbol for potassium, just as Na is for sodium, Cl for chlorine, etc. and much shorter to write.

best answer

0
8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 25, 2011
at 07:24 PM

Excessive potassium is fairly dangerous (impacts electrolyte regulation and heart, etc....), so I would suggest working with your doctor on it. Perhaps you are excessively accumulating what little K there is in your diet. So definitely stick with a normal doctor and treatments.

1
Eecc48184707bc26bce631485b5b7e34

on April 25, 2011
at 11:38 PM

How elevated?

Have you retested? ie could it have been just an anomalous result?

It's nearly impossible to get excessive K via diet except in cases there an existing kidney problem or unless taking medication that retains potassium.

Even sports drinks contain little to no K...many contain none, a few contain 40mg per 8 oz, and I've seen the rare one that contains 200 mg per 8 oz.

The RDI for K is 3500 mg and even that is likely low when K intake is viewed through an evolutionary lens.

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