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Post Workout Nutrition- fat loss goal

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 02, 2012 at 9:00 PM

I'm a bit confused when it comes to post workout nutrition. I just started with paleo so I'm trying to learn along the way. My primary goal is fat loss. Typically I will do 5x a week weight training with 2x a week with some HIIT so I'm unsure how to go about pwo nutrition. I've heard eating fat is not a good idea after weight training but I'm trying to eat low carbs and higher fat and protein. So...simply? What is correct, carbs and protein, protein and fat? And what would be an example of these meals?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 04:36 PM

After reading your answer again, the OP is doing resistance training and HIIT, which combined is hands down the best way to lose body fat. YOur answer that "the workouts are not likely to be much benefit" is wrong.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:54 PM

...and to clarify, fat loss and weight loss are different things. I've never cared much about weight loss.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:52 PM

Oh yeah okay. You never specified that it was specifically aerobic training that you were talking about. If we can both agree that resistance training and HIIT (which are both anaerobic) are good for fat loss, then I think we're on roughly the same page.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:45 PM

Oh. yeah okay I agree about aerobic training- I thought you were against resistance training too, which I though was stupid, but I guess you're not. So long as we can agree that resistance training is good for fat loss, then I think we're on roughly the same page.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:57 PM

@fy: Here's the abstract of a meta-analysis that looked at the connection between aerobic exercise and weight-loss: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21787904

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:53 PM

@JayJay: I'm assuming that the OP will continue with weight-training. That will preserve lean body mass, but will almost certainly not help with fat-loss. Again, I don't know of any evidence that a special post-workout meal is going to help with fat-loss, either.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:48 PM

@fy: I don't know of any evidence that, for someone who's goal is fat-loss, changing the timing or macro-content of meals around workouts is going to help at all. If you think it does, then the burden of proof is on you.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:39 PM

@fy: I'll refer you to an ACSM Position Stand for the above: http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2009/02000/Appropriate_Physical_Activity_Intervention.26.aspx . In particular, the ACSM looked at 8 studies between 1999 and 2009 where the effect of weight-training on fat-loss was measured. Half of them showed a modest benefit over 16-26 weeks. The other half showed no benefit at all over 12-52 weeks. The ACSM concluded that weight-traing can't be recommended as a weight-loss tool. So, I stand by what I said: The workouts aren't likely to be of much help for fat-loss.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:20 PM

@fy: There's hardly anything in exercise physiology that's more well-established than the fact that aerobic exercise has, at best, a modest effect on fat-loss. We're talking an average of 6 pounds or so for 5-7 hours a week over 6-12 months. Not a good investment in time by anyone's standards, I would think. Also, the benefit is smaller when combined with a calorie-restricted diet. When combined with a severely calorie-restricted diet, the benefit disappears altogether. Weight training, for all practical purposes, has no benefit at all for fat-loss.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:57 PM

I'll remove my down vote if you can convince me I'm wrong, but just a note I'm very stubborn, which has nothing to do with the validity of evidence offered in contradiction to my views.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:56 PM

All remove my down vote if you can convince me otherwise.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:54 PM

SK, do you just say that to be contrarian? YOu keep writing roughly the same thing to questions like these and yet you provide no personal or clinical evidence to offer as support.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:37 AM

Well I wouldn't say "the workouts are not likely to be of much benefit"....I mean in composition studies strength training usually comes out as the most important aspect determining the type of weight lost. Body burns fat and spares muscle when you strength train.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:21 AM

insulin sensitivity peaks post workout, so it's important to get carbs in then to make the most of them to refill muscle glycogen so you can go at it tomorrow and continuously improve your performance and physique. Peri workout nutrition is absolutely vital and I assure you that you will not find an elite athlete anywhere that ignores this.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:19 AM

insulin sensitivity peaks post workout, so it's important to get carbs in then to make the most of them to refill muscle glycogen so you can go at it tomorrow and continuously improve your performance and physique.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:16 AM

Do you just say that to be contrarian? You keep writing the same thing without providing any evidence be it anecdotal or clinical. I'm just confused why you keep writing this.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:55 AM

I agree with PA, and you can substantially reduce the total grams of carbs you need to consume to properly recover if you time them appropriately- namely, as soon as you can get them in following your lifting session. The idea that this will inhibit fat burning is not true. In the post workout period, ingested glucose goes to refill glycogen stores. Fatty acids can still go to fueling your resting energy requirements.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:50 AM

I agree with PA, and you can substantially reduce the total grams of carbs you need to consume to properly recover if you time them appropriately- namely, as soon as you can get them in following your lifting session. The idea that this will inhibit fat burning is bs. In the post workout period, ingested glucose goes to refill glycogen stores. Fatty acids can still go to fueling your resting energy requirements.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:46 AM

I agree with PA, and you can substantially reduce the total grams of carbs you need to consume to properly recover if you time them appropriately.

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4 Answers

3
1407bd6152d9fdbc239250385159fea1

on July 03, 2012
at 12:39 AM

Energy balance is the biggest factor in fat loss. With that said though, post workout meals would be best served being composed of protein and carbohydrate. You said that you're attempting to eat a low carb diet, but with a training volume like that (5 x strength + 2 x HIIT), I would not recommend you continue to do that.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:55 AM

I agree with PA, and you can substantially reduce the total grams of carbs you need to consume to properly recover if you time them appropriately- namely, as soon as you can get them in following your lifting session. The idea that this will inhibit fat burning is not true. In the post workout period, ingested glucose goes to refill glycogen stores. Fatty acids can still go to fueling your resting energy requirements.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:50 AM

I agree with PA, and you can substantially reduce the total grams of carbs you need to consume to properly recover if you time them appropriately- namely, as soon as you can get them in following your lifting session. The idea that this will inhibit fat burning is bs. In the post workout period, ingested glucose goes to refill glycogen stores. Fatty acids can still go to fueling your resting energy requirements.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:46 AM

I agree with PA, and you can substantially reduce the total grams of carbs you need to consume to properly recover if you time them appropriately.

2
F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:11 AM

If your primary goal is fat loss, the workouts are not likely to be of much benefit, and food timing is even less important. Just train between your normal meals.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 04:36 PM

After reading your answer again, the OP is doing resistance training and HIIT, which combined is hands down the best way to lose body fat. YOur answer that "the workouts are not likely to be much benefit" is wrong.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:16 AM

Do you just say that to be contrarian? You keep writing the same thing without providing any evidence be it anecdotal or clinical. I'm just confused why you keep writing this.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:39 PM

@fy: I'll refer you to an ACSM Position Stand for the above: http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2009/02000/Appropriate_Physical_Activity_Intervention.26.aspx . In particular, the ACSM looked at 8 studies between 1999 and 2009 where the effect of weight-training on fat-loss was measured. Half of them showed a modest benefit over 16-26 weeks. The other half showed no benefit at all over 12-52 weeks. The ACSM concluded that weight-traing can't be recommended as a weight-loss tool. So, I stand by what I said: The workouts aren't likely to be of much help for fat-loss.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:48 PM

@fy: I don't know of any evidence that, for someone who's goal is fat-loss, changing the timing or macro-content of meals around workouts is going to help at all. If you think it does, then the burden of proof is on you.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:20 PM

@fy: There's hardly anything in exercise physiology that's more well-established than the fact that aerobic exercise has, at best, a modest effect on fat-loss. We're talking an average of 6 pounds or so for 5-7 hours a week over 6-12 months. Not a good investment in time by anyone's standards, I would think. Also, the benefit is smaller when combined with a calorie-restricted diet. When combined with a severely calorie-restricted diet, the benefit disappears altogether. Weight training, for all practical purposes, has no benefit at all for fat-loss.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:19 AM

insulin sensitivity peaks post workout, so it's important to get carbs in then to make the most of them to refill muscle glycogen so you can go at it tomorrow and continuously improve your performance and physique.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:21 AM

insulin sensitivity peaks post workout, so it's important to get carbs in then to make the most of them to refill muscle glycogen so you can go at it tomorrow and continuously improve your performance and physique. Peri workout nutrition is absolutely vital and I assure you that you will not find an elite athlete anywhere that ignores this.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:53 PM

@JayJay: I'm assuming that the OP will continue with weight-training. That will preserve lean body mass, but will almost certainly not help with fat-loss. Again, I don't know of any evidence that a special post-workout meal is going to help with fat-loss, either.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:57 PM

I'll remove my down vote if you can convince me I'm wrong, but just a note I'm very stubborn, which has nothing to do with the validity of evidence offered in contradiction to my views.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:37 AM

Well I wouldn't say "the workouts are not likely to be of much benefit"....I mean in composition studies strength training usually comes out as the most important aspect determining the type of weight lost. Body burns fat and spares muscle when you strength train.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:54 PM

SK, do you just say that to be contrarian? YOu keep writing roughly the same thing to questions like these and yet you provide no personal or clinical evidence to offer as support.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:52 PM

Oh yeah okay. You never specified that it was specifically aerobic training that you were talking about. If we can both agree that resistance training and HIIT (which are both anaerobic) are good for fat loss, then I think we're on roughly the same page.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:56 PM

All remove my down vote if you can convince me otherwise.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on July 03, 2012
at 02:57 PM

@fy: Here's the abstract of a meta-analysis that looked at the connection between aerobic exercise and weight-loss: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21787904

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:45 PM

Oh. yeah okay I agree about aerobic training- I thought you were against resistance training too, which I though was stupid, but I guess you're not. So long as we can agree that resistance training is good for fat loss, then I think we're on roughly the same page.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:54 PM

...and to clarify, fat loss and weight loss are different things. I've never cared much about weight loss.

0
73d5c41f98957f14f1a606d866770955

on July 06, 2012
at 12:54 PM

If you are dissatisfied with your weight or shape, or frustrated by the lack of progress you are getting from your training, YOU ARE NOT ALONE! I have met hundreds of individuals with the same concerns who ask me my expert advice on the confusing and often incorrect messages that circulate the media with regard to Training and Nutrition.

0
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:02 AM

Post workout "meal" is overrated. Your whole day load is what is important. And you would have to be a bit more specific about your workouts. Do you do weights as a split 5 ways? Five whole body days? If its the latter your likely overdoing it (well if your doing a significant intensity anyhow).

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