2

votes

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Answered on June 24, 2015
Created January 13, 2012 at 3:34 AM

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D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on September 01, 2012
at 02:23 AM

Yeah, the first thing I thought of was hypermobility, too. I'm like that, as is about half my huge family. And if you're all loosey goosey AND something isn't sitting right, you're gonna have issues. Pilates has been amazing for me - I think a really good (eg. professional dancer, not someone who dabbles) instructor might rock your world. And, of course, anything in the water.

Aacabe21bcb2c8a5a15717d60447c1f4

(144)

on July 28, 2012
at 06:10 PM

With a gymnast background, you could consider trying aerial arts?

D2db41500a9385fafe0f50e178717e80

(193)

on January 19, 2012
at 05:46 PM

That's absolutely true! Avoid the knife, if possible, but also be honest with yourself if conditions have not improved over a determined amount of time. If you feel/see/experience no change, there is no change.

D2db41500a9385fafe0f50e178717e80

(193)

on January 13, 2012
at 09:06 PM

Laurie, I agree with Daniel's comments. I had ACL surgery almost 2 years ago and it turned out to be a failed surgery, which means I'm going in for round 2 in about a month. You can guess that the last 2+ years of my life have been physically and emotionally draining trying to get back into triathlon shape. That being said, I'm putting together a simple blog to give people like you and I more in-depth info. I'm going to have videos, links to doctors, PTs, etc.; basically everyone I've contacted in the past 2 years as experts. If you'd like to read, just let me know.

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on January 13, 2012
at 04:45 AM

1) Get the surgeries you need to fix this problem to the extent to which it is fixable. www.kneeguru.co.uk/ is a good site, if you want help finding an orthopod, just axe. Injured knees get worse when left untreated. 2) Swimming, very careful weight training, possibly indoor cycling or rowing.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on January 13, 2012
at 04:41 AM

They draw out a bunch of blood, spin it down to concentrate platelets, and inject it in the joint space. That is supposed to act to accelerate healing, and often does. Costs a boatload though. I had it once, and it kinda sucked. But helps many athletes (I think the Steelers used it a couple years ago). I also have hefty hyperextension in my knees, and you gotta be pretty darn careful, as I'm sure you know!

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on January 13, 2012
at 04:34 AM

+1 for water sports, if you do happen to be near an ocean given bodyboarding a shot.

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11 Answers

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1
483dcc7211e956d7fe950aa9fb06516f

on August 31, 2012
at 09:54 PM

Laurie - Your knees could be mine! I have virtually no patellar groove - my kneecaps have been sliding out since I was 15 - I'm 39 now. My first doc told me I could push them out with my bare hands, they're so unstable. My knees will never track normally - I've been the "come here you've got to see this you'll never see one like this again" patient more than once! The key is to keep the surrounding muscles strong. Supposedly, our knees will tighten up with age, as everything gets less flexible, but mine still slip out - just last Sunday night I bonked the table leg with my left knee and the patella slipped out just a little. Anyways, my doc now is a cyclist and strongly encourages me to bike tons too - I also swim (badly, but it feels good), and lift weights (carefully). 2 years ago I slipped in my kitchen and spun around 180 degrees - yep my left kneecap was on the side! I put it back into place and called 911. When the ER doc had looked at my x-rays, he said that my knee was FINE (but my ankle was broken) - I honestly think it was fine because of all the biking and swimming I had been doing! So no knee immobilization (just a boot on the ankle and crutches for that - ugh). SO, you need to go to a bike shop and get fitted for a bike - road or cruiser probably - and hit the road!!! When you're riding, keep the gears easy if you're not used to riding, until you build up more strength. Good luck and have fun!!!

2
F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on January 13, 2012
at 05:10 PM

If you live near any water body, get yourself a kayak. It's one of those great play/relaxation/exercises where (unless it's whitewater) you don't get out of breath, but you're using your muscles and lowering your stress level. It's not just your arms, but your core that gets a workout. I love it and can't wait until winter's over so I can get out again.

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 13, 2012
at 02:58 PM

I think your best option is surgical repair. The only sport that I think may work is swimming because the water supports you.

I think injections may just delay the inevitable need for repair.

2
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on January 13, 2012
at 04:26 AM

Have you been "diagnosed" with hypermobility? Your gymnast past hints at such.

You probably already know this, but certain sports and activities are out (extreme yoga, things where you cut really fast like soccer). Not too many of the really fun activities are left over!

Have you considered platelet-rich plasma injections to regain some knee stability? I went to the guy in the Bay Area who did the first couple trials with it, and knees are the second best body part for them (first is elbows).

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on January 13, 2012
at 04:41 AM

They draw out a bunch of blood, spin it down to concentrate platelets, and inject it in the joint space. That is supposed to act to accelerate healing, and often does. Costs a boatload though. I had it once, and it kinda sucked. But helps many athletes (I think the Steelers used it a couple years ago). I also have hefty hyperextension in my knees, and you gotta be pretty darn careful, as I'm sure you know!

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on September 01, 2012
at 02:23 AM

Yeah, the first thing I thought of was hypermobility, too. I'm like that, as is about half my huge family. And if you're all loosey goosey AND something isn't sitting right, you're gonna have issues. Pilates has been amazing for me - I think a really good (eg. professional dancer, not someone who dabbles) instructor might rock your world. And, of course, anything in the water.

2
A942dbc90fe12f7f90744a68f9f223e2

(249)

on January 13, 2012
at 04:24 AM

I don't have knee problems, but I know people that do and they find cycling to be therapeutic. You do mention an exercise bike, but it is much better physically and mentally to ride in the great outdoors IMHO. However, it is important to have a good bike fit and the seat set at the correct height, especially with bad knees.

2
A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

on January 13, 2012
at 04:07 AM

I don't have tilted patellas, but my knees occasionally bother me from years of football, weightlifting, youthful indiscretion. I'm normally able to work through knee pain fairly quickly. For low impact activity, I like swimming or simply moving in water (especially fighting waves in the ocean ??? obviously you may not be near an ocean) and I love my Concept 2 rowing machine. Of course, old Furls likes some other "play" and "exercise" - though not always guaranteed to be low impact.

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on January 13, 2012
at 04:34 AM

+1 for water sports, if you do happen to be near an ocean given bodyboarding a shot.

1
E7e57f3e3a156df4072ca85d463f8ed3

(358)

on August 31, 2012
at 10:19 PM

I had bad, loose knees since I grew 6" in one year at age 12, followed by partial ACL tears doing long jumps on the gym floor with no mats.

In 2000 I completely tore off one ACL and had it repaired with a piece of my patellar tendon. Since I was 46 I was highly motivated to have a good result & did my physio, icing, etc. like clockwork. My knee has been better than ever and my doctor was shocked that I healed twice as fast as "normal".

Physiotherapy can also work wonders, building up muscles to strengthen & stablilize the knees. That's how I tightened up my other knee. They are both equally tight and stable, though only one was operated on.

I would try physio first to see how much progress you can make. Even if you do decide to have surgery, you will recover faster if your knee/quad/hamstring/calf muscles are strengthened.

1
81d5dcf5f86a8bd104a5955ac29fe832

on August 31, 2012
at 10:04 PM

I've dislocated my left kneecap three times [first time I slipped on wet concrete, everyone thought it was just a freak accident; second time I was just...walking, and third time I was on mile 7 of an 8 mile run at my fastest pace ever]. Surgery won't help since the channel in my femur that your patella slides into when you straighten your knee - well, I basically have no channel. Go me.

Swimming is the best thing ever though! You don't feel yourself sweat AND there's no impact!

I also love yoga, I am just super careful about some poses and simply don't do a few others.

I'm trying Bar Method classes next week - sort of like a high-intensity Pilates and strength training, also no or low impact.

Other than that, I do lots of brisk walking - 4.5 miles at a 15-17 minute mile pace 3x a week. It's fun when I'm not alone doing it!

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on June 24, 2015
at 03:11 PM

Laurie, why did you edit/delete these questions?  These threads on Paleohacks are not personally identifiable, and they may have helped others facing similar issues who are seeking answers!

 

This is uncool!

0
D2d1f4627338216b41411f29b5e209ed

on March 30, 2014
at 04:31 AM

Hi, my name is Cassie. I am 10 years old. I know how you feel. My doctor said that I have messed up knees and flat feet too. My doctor advised me to do low impact sports and exercises like bike riding, swimming, and walking for a while. I am interested in gymnastics but I need to know if this is a low impact sport or not. Can anyone help me figure it out? Thank you.

,

Hi, my name is Cassie. I am 10 years old. I know how you feel. My doctor said that I have messed up knees and flat feet too. My doctor advised me to do low impact sports and exercises like bike riding, swimming, and walking for a while. I am interested in gymnastics but I need to know if this is a low impact sport or not. Can anyone help me figure it out? Thank you.

,

Hi, my name is Cassie. I am 10 years old. I know how you feel. My doctor said that I have messed up knees and flat feet too. My doctor advised me to do low impact sports and exercises like bike riding, swimming, and walking for a while. I am interested in gymnastics but I need to know if this is a low impact sport or not. Can anyone help me figure it out? Thank you.

0
E8088fc5f397c2b15af235734df8e1bf

on October 16, 2012
at 07:59 PM

I may be late on this, but I have shallow grooves, started having trouble in my early 20's, and it just progressed. I had surger called patella femoral resurfacing, which is really putting plastic under the knee cap to replace the cartilage that was gone, and a metal femoral groove. My knees work for the first time in my life. I had the surgery when I was 47. My daughter has worse knees than me and a flat femoral groove with tipped patellas. She blew out the medial patella ligament and dislocated the knee playing soccer at 12 - she has the chronic problems you talk about and that I had. She is in discomfort or pain often.

Neither of us got much help from physical therapy. I found that once you are walking, they are done with you, and that has never helped. We both worked with a good personal trainer, and that has made the difference. The other thing that helps alot is massage because the muscles are always unbalanced and it helps to release the tight quads and IT band - if they are too tight, all the strengthening in the world is not going to help you.

I had surgery on both knees at the same time, and it was hard. Took a year to get to a good place, and two years for full recovery, but I'm glad I did it. I'd been through too many years of continual problems and doctors telling me I had to learn to live with it.

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