0

votes

what can i do to revive a rose plant? paleo fertilizers/things plants like?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 31, 2011 at 10:06 AM

Hi all, I have a rose plant that I was meaning to re-pot in a larger container, but now it's a bit late and it's wilting :( besides re-potting, what can I do/feed it or use as fertilizer to help it out? I've heard of egg shells but not much else...

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on July 31, 2011
at 03:25 PM

I can only say that it worked for me. I had a rose bush that was very nearly murdered, and after doing this it is now taller than I am and blooming like crazy.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 31, 2011
at 03:21 PM

This really isn't a good idea on a drought stressed plant. Let it recover from the drought stress before giving it any fertilizers. The cure for drought stress is H2O and minimizing moisture loss until the plant recovers. Fertilizers require the plant to utilize extra water, not a good ideain drought stress which is effectively what this is. I've worked as a horticulturist for more than 30 years. This is an extremely common misconception. Fertilizer is not medicine, nor is it a miracle.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 31, 2011
at 11:53 AM

I agree with Happy Now that most roses (true miniature being the exception) don't like growing in pots, and that yours could be too far gone. They are a lot of work in most climates. I think what Happy Now is looking for is the old rose on "own root". Own root roses are grown from cuttings so they have no graft - the entire plant is what it is. They are slower to get started so usually cost more, but if damage happens to the top, what grows back from the base will be identical, rather than an unknown from the stock. Rose cuttings are not hard to root - consult a rose expert.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 31, 2011
at 11:46 AM

NO fertilizer on a drought stressed plant! Soak the root system for 12 hours, NO longer than that than plant in your pots. Keep evenly moist, in shade until it recovers from wilt. Then gradually move into sun. After 6 weeks of recovery you can start fertilizing it as you would a normal rose in a container. I agree that this question would be better asked in a rose forum or of a rosarian or horticulturist.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 31, 2011
at 10:25 AM

Would this perhaps be better addressed on another forum? Roses are heavy feeders, but they also suffer shock easily, so you have to be careful with the fertilizer and ph balance. Try keeping it evenly moist, add a sprinkle of epsom salt to the soil, and keep your fingers crossed. In my experience they don't care for being in pots, and do best in the ground. Frankly, they're kinda prissy plants and I regret having planted so many in my garden. I've started encouraging the "old roses" that grow out below the graft because they seem much more resistant to disease and are lower maintenance.

  • 5d6a58590ba76136e8dc50c561c8ada2

    asked by

    (450)
  • Views
    1K
  • Last Activity
    1426D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

0
3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on July 31, 2011
at 05:11 PM

Soil-based Probiotics... my used this and he grew great roses. He was friends with the owners that patented the strain.

FloraBalance BOD strain (Bacillus laterosporus) -- it comes in a powdered form at iherb.com

-1
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on July 31, 2011
at 02:36 PM

I revived a bunch of rose bushes that were near death with 1/4 cup Epsom salt around the root, then give it a good soaking to work the Epsom salt into the soil.

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on July 31, 2011
at 03:25 PM

I can only say that it worked for me. I had a rose bush that was very nearly murdered, and after doing this it is now taller than I am and blooming like crazy.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 31, 2011
at 03:21 PM

This really isn't a good idea on a drought stressed plant. Let it recover from the drought stress before giving it any fertilizers. The cure for drought stress is H2O and minimizing moisture loss until the plant recovers. Fertilizers require the plant to utilize extra water, not a good ideain drought stress which is effectively what this is. I've worked as a horticulturist for more than 30 years. This is an extremely common misconception. Fertilizer is not medicine, nor is it a miracle.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!