2

votes

Good foraging and plant identification guides with photos?

Commented on July 07, 2014
Created October 10, 2012 at 2:45 AM

Went berry picking today and found some blueberries surprisingly. I also found some other berries, but I had no idea if they were the toxic kind.

002981cd1d579c30a4d2a63e5230954f

on July 07, 2014
at 06:13 PM

The fellow who administers this website has misidentified plants on his website. Especially when they are common and easily identified plants; that is disturbing. He knows a lot, but you need to check out his materials before feeding them to yourself or loved ones.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on October 11, 2012
at 05:55 PM

Northeast unfortunately

Frontpage book

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4 Answers

best answer

0
D9e4b265ef308c8cabf847559fd8be2e

on October 10, 2012
at 01:36 PM

Check out this site: http://www.eattheweeds.com/

002981cd1d579c30a4d2a63e5230954f

on July 07, 2014
at 06:13 PM

The fellow who administers this website has misidentified plants on his website. Especially when they are common and easily identified plants; that is disturbing. He knows a lot, but you need to check out his materials before feeding them to yourself or loved ones.

0
002981cd1d579c30a4d2a63e5230954f

on July 07, 2014
at 06:09 PM

Firstly, when it comes to finding an edible wild plant resource book, I would not advocate being too stuck on color photographs. Color photos do a great job at presenting the general appearance of plants, but that is an insufficient criterion for judgement. Many times color photos deceive more easily than they inform because the reader may not know which of the details are critical, and which are variables that are irrelevant.

The Peterson Field Guide series does a credible job of stressing which details are the most important just using simple line drawings with anatomical details highlighted. The Peterson Field Guide to the Edible Wild Plants of Eastern and Central North America by Lee Peterson, is a good book to start with.

No color photo is going to be very useful to someone who doesn't know about leaf arrangements, flower parts and the proper terms for the stuff that makes the identification-of-plants endeavor possible. This knowledge is attainable and interesting and has the added benefit of preventing killing off your loved ones by accident.

And as always, leave your food explorations of plants in the carrot family [Apiaceae] for last. These are the most difficult plants for most amateurs to ID, and the penalties for a screw-up can be a very fast fatality.

Other good books to start with are:

Edible Wild Plants: From Dirt to Plate by John Kallas

Forager's Harvest by Samuel Thayer

Nature's Garden by Samuel Thayer

Thanks for reading.

0
026dde5c5ed48e30d006ac075410871e

(288)

on October 11, 2012
at 04:32 PM

I love Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast - great color photographs and well organized. Obviously only applicable if you live in Washington/B.C./Oregon though.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on October 11, 2012
at 05:55 PM

Northeast unfortunately

0
0e2bd01a4b24c10af91033fe5dcf3b07

(324)

on October 10, 2012
at 03:55 AM

If you're in the US check to see if your state's conservation department has anything published. I know good ol' Missouri has had several books and guides on wild edibles over the years.

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