2

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Can phytase from one food counterbalance the phytic acid from another food?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 27, 2013 at 9:56 PM

I found an article about pigs being supplemented with phytase and came to the conclusion that phytase from white flour could counterbalance the phytic acid in nuts making nuts less harmfull?

so would that mean if you ate white bread before eating nuts or beans that the phytse in white bread would be enough to break down the phytic acid?

or would that mean eating a white bread nut sandwitch would make nuts phytic acid free?

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 08, 2013
at 12:58 PM

Looks like it. Apparently sourdough fermentation creates an environment that allows phytase to effectively act on phytic acid (note that phytase is the ENZYME that breaks down phytic acid, and thus is a good thing :) ) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15631515

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on July 03, 2013
at 09:21 PM

isn't sourdough effective at minimizing phytase?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on June 28, 2013
at 04:28 PM

Is http://paleohacks.com/users/29742/leanne#axzz2XWrdff8E AND http://paleohacks.com/users/29760/leanne#axzz2XWrdff8E the same person? both suddenly spamming with multiple questions about the same topic

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on June 28, 2013
at 12:34 PM

I concede that this is for the most part a duplicate question but I'd still be interested in knowing the answer to this question. +1 regardless.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 28, 2013
at 07:03 AM

You have asked 4 questions essentially the same. I have voted on 3 of them to close the question.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 27, 2013
at 11:59 PM

Essentially a duplicate. Stop spamming silliness about phytic acid.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 27, 2013
at 10:17 PM

Who cares that much about phytic acid? It's not gonna kill you. There's such a tiny amount of phytase in wheat that it won't do much anyway. Just eat the nuts and chill out with these questions.

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1 Answers

1
C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

on July 03, 2013
at 02:45 PM

The important thing to consider is that phytase is an enzyme and thus has specific conditions under which it will actually break down phytic acid. A full write-up on phytase can be found here:http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/as/as-560-w.pdf but the salient points are that phytase from plants (as opposed to microbial phytase) only activates in temperatures of 113 to 140 degrees fahrenheit and that phytase (like all enzymes) is degraded by excessively high heat (like the baking process of bread or even sometimes the grinding process for flour) and is no longer effective after that degredation. As such, bread is NOT a source of phytase because the baking process essentially destroys the phytase. Furthermore, keep in mind that the phytase reaction (again, like all enzymatic reactions) takes TIME. This is why the preferred method of reducing phytic acid is soaking and sprouting: soaking in water and an acidic medium helps to ensure that phytase actually reaches the physical proximity of the phytic-acid bound minerals. I highly doubt that consuming a high-phytase food along with a food rich in phytic acid would allow enough time for the enzyme reaction to take place.

Edit: That link that I posted has a note that phytin (the compound that phytic acid forms in plants) is not soluble inside our small intestine. This means that phytin inside your small intestine cannot be dissolved into solution, which is a necessary component of enzymatic reactions. In other words, the reaction of phytase with phytic acid that prevents the phytic acid from binding minerals CANNOT happen inside your body.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on July 03, 2013
at 09:21 PM

isn't sourdough effective at minimizing phytase?

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 08, 2013
at 12:58 PM

Looks like it. Apparently sourdough fermentation creates an environment that allows phytase to effectively act on phytic acid (note that phytase is the ENZYME that breaks down phytic acid, and thus is a good thing :) ) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15631515

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