2

votes

PHD Followers: How Do You Prepare White Rice?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 25, 2012 at 4:27 AM

I want to diversify my sampling of starch and carbohydrate food sources. I've eaten white rice sporadically over the last couple of months and I seem to have no problems. In fact, I seem to feel much better after eating rice.

I would only eat a 1/3 cup serving daily, enough to fill a small rice bowl. So that would be 200 calories, 45g of carbs and 4g of protein. As long as I keep it to this amount, I don't find rice to be very high glycemic. Plus, I eat rice with my steak or fish, some greens (spinach, collard greens or kale), boiled or steamed veggies (cabbage, broccoli, or cauliflower), and my bone broth.

My BG seems to shoot up higher from sweet potatoes, which I will still consume but not as much. I also eat a small amount of yuca/cassava when I'm eating steak, a habit I cannot break because it makes steak taste so much better.

Question: what kind of rice do you recommend? So far, I've sampled, Bismatti, Texmati, Kasmati, Long Grain, Extra Long Grain, parboiled, Jazmin, sushi, organic, and even enriched white rice. Carbs are about the same and there's very little fiber, so GL is not an issue. I'm not really into the Asian sticky rice for making sushi; I prefer the longer-grain and fluffy Bismatti type of white rice, which are softer and tastier.

But I am concerned about getting all the fortified stuff out (like niacin, iron, thiamine, and folic acid) when I wash. It seems that washing rice before boiling isn't enough. Do you also soak as well? I was surprised to find so much white stuff, which I only expected from the enriched kind, when washing "Himalayan Pride" Basmatti rice ("authentically aged") straight from India, with no label indicating that it's ever been enriched. Perhaps stick to the "organic" white rice from Whole Foods then?

What is the safest type of this "safe starch" and the safest way of preparing it?

7d01d86c539003eed77cf901bf037412

(1076)

on March 25, 2012
at 06:57 PM

What I meant was: cook the onion to the stage before caramelisation, so it's see-through but not brown. Then when you stir the rice through the onion/fat, it absorbs some fat and becomes translucent instead of white. Then I put the water in.

Medium avatar

(2923)

on March 25, 2012
at 06:51 PM

Different types of rice react differently when cooked. Long grain rice (basmati, jasmine) usually starts out semi-translucent when uncooked and becomes opaque when cooked. Short grain rice (sticky, glutinous, sushi) start out opaque when uncooked and become semi-translucent when cooked.

Medium avatar

(2923)

on March 25, 2012
at 05:36 PM

Golden Fried Rice is a really easy variation of this: refrigerated leftover rice (must start out cold), couple whisked eggs, coconut oil, and coconut aminos. Get your pan hot, add coconut oil, when it's melted, add eggs and then immediately add rice on top and start stirring them together. Keep moving and stirring until the egg coats all the rice and cooks through. Season with coconut aminos. Serve.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 25, 2012
at 02:57 PM

Yeah, those rices are really beautiful! They can be a touch pricey for me though, but I love them as a treat, if mostly for aesthetics. Also, white rice is "polished" not bleached like flour. So that is good!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 25, 2012
at 02:54 PM

Yeah, white rice is fortified by default in US to replace nutrients lost in packaging. I guess that would require imported rice to fortify as well? I'm not sure, haha, I don't live in the US! Also the "naturally aromatic" refers to the post-cooking smell, but I agree that most rice pretty much smells the same to me.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on March 25, 2012
at 06:58 AM

What do you mean it goes "transparent"?

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on March 25, 2012
at 05:34 AM

Also says, "Naturally Aromatic." It's not really aromatic, however; smells no different than any other white rice, if there is any smell at all.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on March 25, 2012
at 05:33 AM

I assumed it's enriched because even though there is no indication, in the US-required nutrition facts label, it says niacin 8%, thiamine 13%, and iron 6%. White rice can't have these micronutrients unless fortified, right? Other than that, it just sauys Product of India and "authentic aged", whatever that means.

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8 Answers

2
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 25, 2012
at 05:00 AM

If you mean that the water turns white when you rinse it, that's mostly just powdered starch from storage that you are rinsing off, or the enrichment if it is enriched rice. The enrichment is essentially powdered vitamins, and from my understanding rinses right off. But even if the rice isn't enriched, it's normal for the water to turn whitish while rinsing it. From all the grains being together and rubbing against each other, some starch will be rubbed off into powder.

I personally don't pre soak, though there are some claims (I'm not sure the validity?) that soaking neutralizes inhibitors and increases vitamin content. I have never done it, but I'm sure there is someone who could probably better comment on the possible benefits of soaking. Some people also soak grains to make them easier to digest, though if that's a non-issue as it said, I probably wouldn't worry too much.

I cook Basmati rice (my favourite, texturally) in bone broth, at relatively low heat with the lid on. This is an excellent way to get in some bone broth while your at it, and produces a tender, flavourful dish. I recommend this method, mostly for it's taste but also for the additional nutrients from the broth.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 25, 2012
at 02:54 PM

Yeah, white rice is fortified by default in US to replace nutrients lost in packaging. I guess that would require imported rice to fortify as well? I'm not sure, haha, I don't live in the US! Also the "naturally aromatic" refers to the post-cooking smell, but I agree that most rice pretty much smells the same to me.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on March 25, 2012
at 05:34 AM

Also says, "Naturally Aromatic." It's not really aromatic, however; smells no different than any other white rice, if there is any smell at all.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on March 25, 2012
at 05:33 AM

I assumed it's enriched because even though there is no indication, in the US-required nutrition facts label, it says niacin 8%, thiamine 13%, and iron 6%. White rice can't have these micronutrients unless fortified, right? Other than that, it just sauys Product of India and "authentic aged", whatever that means.

1
4a7929c2aa05bf11349d9e55cb542d47

on March 25, 2012
at 02:08 PM

I use japanese rice (not sushi, that's too sticky). I rinse the rice for about 10 seconds and dump it in the rice cooker with half water, half frozen bone broth. After it's done, I mix in a bit of butter, salt and pepper and enjoy.

This is a common side for my family.. probably two or three times per week.

If I have leftover rice in the morning, I'll dump that into a pan with a bit of coconut oil to warm it up and put it in a bowl with a couple over easy eggs on top.

Medium avatar

(2923)

on March 25, 2012
at 05:36 PM

Golden Fried Rice is a really easy variation of this: refrigerated leftover rice (must start out cold), couple whisked eggs, coconut oil, and coconut aminos. Get your pan hot, add coconut oil, when it's melted, add eggs and then immediately add rice on top and start stirring them together. Keep moving and stirring until the egg coats all the rice and cooks through. Season with coconut aminos. Serve.

1
4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on March 25, 2012
at 08:07 AM

I usually use a rice cooker, and cook in bone broth. Or, if I am being frugal and have no money, cook in water and then add to bone broth.

In soups, I usually like white basamati or long grain. For eating outside of soups, I like short grain.

I just bought purple sticky rice, and was planning on cooking it with coconut milk.

1
7d01d86c539003eed77cf901bf037412

(1076)

on March 25, 2012
at 05:33 AM

In my neck of the woods, rice is not enriched.

I usually cook some chopped onion in coconut oil or butter or beef fat until transparent, then I toss the rice through until it goes transparent, then I add about twice the volume of the rice in water and some salt, and simmer with the lid on at a low heat for 25 minutes. In other words, a variant of the absorption method.

Medium avatar

(2923)

on March 25, 2012
at 06:51 PM

Different types of rice react differently when cooked. Long grain rice (basmati, jasmine) usually starts out semi-translucent when uncooked and becomes opaque when cooked. Short grain rice (sticky, glutinous, sushi) start out opaque when uncooked and become semi-translucent when cooked.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on March 25, 2012
at 06:58 AM

What do you mean it goes "transparent"?

7d01d86c539003eed77cf901bf037412

(1076)

on March 25, 2012
at 06:57 PM

What I meant was: cook the onion to the stage before caramelisation, so it's see-through but not brown. Then when you stir the rice through the onion/fat, it absorbs some fat and becomes translucent instead of white. Then I put the water in.

0
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

THere was a post on Mark's Daily Apple not long ago where he looked at the different rice types. I think of the white rices (because that was your question), he said parboiled is the most nutritionally interesting...

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/is-rice-unhealthy/#axzz1q93t2m00

0
3151fbbd2846551fd27b33f6cba5e546

on March 25, 2012
at 05:53 PM

I use the Delia Smith method: think in terms of volume, and have double the volume of water to rice. Use the widest pot you have, put the lid on and don't take it off, bring to the boil, then turn the heat down to the lowest possible setting. Let it simmer until there's no liquid when you tip the pot a little (about 10 minutes). Then turn off the heat, remove the lid, and put a dishcloth across the top of the pot for 5-10 minutes. Makes perfect rice every time!

0
Medium avatar

(2923)

on March 25, 2012
at 05:32 PM

I cheat and just use a rice cooker. I usually split one of the rice cooker's servings into two (ie. lunch and dinner).

As for types, it depends on the meal since there's so many varieties. Indian curries get basmati, Thai and SouthEast Asian foods get jasmine, Japanese and Okinawan foods get a sushi-style ...

0
Fc6593b8fa14fcbbba15b162f363a521

on March 25, 2012
at 05:10 AM

Have you tried eating Thai red rice? Also there is "black" or purple rice. But I'd try seeing how you do with Thai red rice. It hasn't been bleached to death. I've been told that they actually serve this rice in Thai prisons (basically, your least-proccessed-rice-avaliable guarantee-- gotta keep the costs down).

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 25, 2012
at 02:57 PM

Yeah, those rices are really beautiful! They can be a touch pricey for me though, but I love them as a treat, if mostly for aesthetics. Also, white rice is "polished" not bleached like flour. So that is good!

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