3

votes

Are slightly warmed bones safe to feed to your dog? (pictures)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 11, 2011 at 1:00 AM

Would you feed this:

alt text

To him?

alt text

He is begging for that T-bone! I feed Chucky only raw food, so he is accustomed to eating raw meat with bones every day. But I was cautioned to never give your dog a bone that had been cooked. I do not give him any cooked bones from a roasted chicken, bone-in ham or a stewed chicken for example. But what about a large steak bone that probably only made it to room temperature? Is a light sear considered cooked? I ate this T-bone steak extremely rare, just seared on the outside, cool and very red center.

Medium avatar

(4878)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Absolutely no cooked bones and no weight bearing bones for dogs. The cooked do splinter, and the weight bearing crack teeth. If you do want to give knuckle bones, have the butcher quarter them and take them away after the marrow and ends are gone. And, always, always, watch your dogs when they are eating bones. Just like with pigs ears, Greenies (Yuck), and hide, weird things DO happen, so keep an eye on the furbabies when they are chowing down. (I worked in an eVet for a while...saw a lotta *weird stuff.)

Medium avatar

(4878)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:05 PM

Thx, he's a sweetheart and the most well mannered gentleman that you could imagine. I always liked high energy, "naughty dogs", so he wouldn't have been a dog that I would have chosen for myself. But life has a way of giving you what you need, not what you want.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on July 11, 2011
at 11:18 AM

+1 for the beautiful dog.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:49 AM

*shrug* you win some and lose some. guess my dogs all just got lucky.

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:36 AM

up vote for such a nice thorough answer! I love the pictures!

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:24 AM

+1 for your great comment above and for being an animal lover.

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:22 AM

shards of shank LOL I feed Chucky all raw: chicken quarters, country style ribs, turkey necks, pigs feet, and cow neck bones, seems to be healthier and happier than ever. add in some ground beef and chicken livers and sardines sometimes too.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:21 AM

Nah, sorry AKD - any bones should be raw for safety

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:20 AM

He looks so content :)

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:20 AM

Yeah I mean, that bone probably didn't break down to the point that it would cause a danger. But if it were me I'd toss it, no reason to put that lil bastard in danger:)

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:18 AM

Yes, weight bearing bones are very tough for dogs. They also have a tendency to shatter/splinter. I am all raw with my dog (all raw meat and bones, not processed "raw food") and I tried lamb shank many times and he'll eat it fine but many time throw up during the night. No big deal really, but there in the vomit is shards of shank.

Medium avatar

(4878)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:14 AM

If you give too much bone, yes, your dog will be constipated. If they eat too much marrow, you'll have the opposite. You can solve both problems by feeding cubed, cooked yams at the same meal.

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:14 AM

Thanks Marie, very informative, you should make it an answer instead of a comment. So..i think my t bone was not cooked so that qualifies. But not sure about the weight bearing part? Meaning leg bones?

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:35 AM

yeah that is why I thought I would ask...the bone is still as hard as a rock and not degraded at all.

34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:21 AM

Thanks for that tip, I had no idea that dogs shouldn't eat cooked bones. I made braised short ribs a while back and gave my aussie shepherd one of the bones. She loved it but later threw it up =(

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:01 AM

sure......my dogs are paleo too.

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7 Answers

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5
Medium avatar

(4878)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:11 AM

Absolutely no cooked bones and no weight bearing bones for dogs. These bones, leg and some consider beef necks to be weight bearing, are too dense for the risk of fracturing teeth. (However, Monte's dentist says there is less risk than in bite/protection sports. But I'd imagine most of those issues are handler error. It isn't unusual to loose entire canine or fracture the tips off in those events.) Here's an *OK survey regarding the risks of feeding raw: Raw Fit Pet

Within my fairly large circle of raw feeders, we've seen many fractured teeth in dogs that were consistently fed weight bearing bones. Some have debated whether this was due to the dog's diet during development, but generally we don't feel it is worth the risk and the associated expense of a root canal ($1,500) or extraction ($450).

The cooked do splinter, and the weight bearing crack teeth. If you do want to see what happens take a cooked bone and smack it with a meat tenderizer. Then do the same with raw bones.

If you do want to give knuckle bones, have the butcher quarter them and take them away after the marrow and ends are gone. And, always, always, watch your dogs when they are eating bones. Just like with pigs ears, Greenies (Yuck), and hide, weird things DO happen, so keep an eye on the furbabies when they are chowing down. (I worked in an eVet for a while...saw a lotta *weird stuff.)

are-slightly-warmed-bones-safe-to-feed-to-your-dog?--(pictures)

Raw bones also make for great teeth cleaner and provide great exercise for their necks and jaws. Don't clean too much off that bone!

are-slightly-warmed-bones-safe-to-feed-to-your-dog?--(pictures)

And a satiated Monte: are-slightly-warmed-bones-safe-to-feed-to-your-dog?--(pictures)

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:20 AM

He looks so content :)

Medium avatar

(4878)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:05 PM

Thx, he's a sweetheart and the most well mannered gentleman that you could imagine. I always liked high energy, "naughty dogs", so he wouldn't have been a dog that I would have chosen for myself. But life has a way of giving you what you need, not what you want.

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:36 AM

up vote for such a nice thorough answer! I love the pictures!

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:24 AM

+1 for your great comment above and for being an animal lover.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on July 11, 2011
at 11:18 AM

+1 for the beautiful dog.

3
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:30 AM

Don't feed your dog cooked bones. They splinter easily. Feed bones raw. A T-bone, btw, is a tough bone for a dog to get through anyway. He could gnaw it some but he may not eat it. That's a tough bone. Ribs are easier for them to break up.

That being said, the bone in your pick doesn't look too cooked so he may fare just fine on it.

As a rule, feed bones raw only.

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:35 AM

yeah that is why I thought I would ask...the bone is still as hard as a rock and not degraded at all.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:20 AM

Yeah I mean, that bone probably didn't break down to the point that it would cause a danger. But if it were me I'd toss it, no reason to put that lil bastard in danger:)

3
C1c86f42410cd4788bd9c5cf801dcd8f

(2246)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:14 AM

I always gave cooked bones to my dogs growing up.

It was just what we did, so I would never have thought twice about it.

2
B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:30 AM

A quick googleage and I came across this article.

Here is a quote:

Raw bones, not cooked bones. Never feed your dog cooked bones, because the cooking process greatly complicates digestion of the bone. There's a far greater chance of bowel obstruction when the bone is cooked. Raw bones, still with a layer of meat on the bone but with as little fat as possible, are a safer choice for a dog treat. Dogs can handle raw meat bacteria better than humans, though there is still a chance of minor illness. If you don't want to risk bacterial illness, the only advisable cooking method for homemade dog bones is boiling.

1
Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

on July 11, 2011
at 01:25 AM

I've fed many a cooked T-bone to my dogs in the past. I have never heard that it was a bad thing and have never seen any ill effects from doing it. I cant speak from a scientific standpoint, but anecdotaly I see no issue from it.

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:48 AM

I give my dog steak bones and the cartilage tips of my oxtails, but she got ill (constipated) when I gave her a stewbone. I have even started giving her the chine bone in my pork chops (since the USDA said it's ok for us peons to eat medium-rare pork). I would never give a slow-cooked bone to the dog. most of the bones I give her end up "chewies" anyway.

Medium avatar

(4878)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:14 AM

If you give too much bone, yes, your dog will be constipated. If they eat too much marrow, you'll have the opposite. You can solve both problems by feeding cubed, cooked yams at the same meal.

0
Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on July 11, 2011
at 01:28 AM

i had always heard that the danger was with poultry bones, which splinter when they are cooked. i think ruminant bones are just fine. my dogs get them too. OUTSIDE.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:49 AM

*shrug* you win some and lose some. guess my dogs all just got lucky.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 11, 2011
at 02:21 AM

Nah, sorry AKD - any bones should be raw for safety

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