5

votes

Most Paleo approach to bug repellent and pest control?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 21, 2011 at 6:25 PM

Any natural substitutes for bug spray and pesticide?

A827bdfe22cd072aaa96fedab31c7b24

on June 16, 2014
at 10:02 AM

According to me most paleo approach would be utilizing organic pest control method. Last my, when my bedroom was badly infested with the bed bugs and was looking for any reliable organic pest control. Thankfully a friend of mine who work at exterminator brooklyn helped me in getting them out with their heat treatment.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 19, 2012
at 04:59 PM

RPS, I put pots of lemon balm by the doors to help keep mosquito varmints from getting into the house.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on February 19, 2012
at 03:24 PM

That's awesome! One year I went to the boy-scouts I brought lots of candy with me. After one week, my legs were a big mess : bug bite everywhere. I couldn't stop scratching. Finally I know why :D.

3f3c952a1a31a12fc2ac49528888c073

(135)

on July 22, 2011
at 12:13 PM

Interesting thanks...

5cbd326041fead0c1ec71fbd106ef083

on July 20, 2011
at 03:38 PM

My brother heard that, and tried it last year. He said for the 2 people in his family that are mosquito-magnets, it did reduce the number of bites. For the other 2 that rarely get bit, they had the same (small) number.

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on April 23, 2011
at 06:34 PM

Hmm, it's not a cure all. Blood type is also a major factor in bug-biting preference. :(

03281912f1cb9e4e771a8a83af302e3a

(1204)

on April 23, 2011
at 03:02 PM

What if you drink enough of it to seep through your pores?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 23, 2011
at 02:19 PM

please define clear. For plants, for the skin. for animals. for children. for furniture. actually there is a lot and so much more if you look for it. espacially natural. one cool tip neem another teatree. its also depend how you use. There will be always people here who claim it dont work. Just dont listen to them. look for the thing which work. and keep on trying and experimenting

C1c86f42410cd4788bd9c5cf801dcd8f

(2246)

on April 22, 2011
at 11:44 AM

Just stay away from open flame...

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on April 22, 2011
at 05:51 AM

they still like to bite me and my girls, but not my hubby and we all eat lots of garlic.

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 21, 2011
at 10:18 PM

I will have to try that tonight.

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on April 21, 2011
at 10:04 PM

I have a fly fishing buddy. He eats straight up SAD and I eat paleo. When we're on the water he gets eaten alive and I barely get touched. There might be something to this...

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on April 21, 2011
at 10:03 PM

I eat bugs, it's super paleo and although I know it's not true I feel like I'm scaring them off

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 21, 2011
at 07:03 PM

They just had a report on this yesterday on the radio - they're developing it as a replacement for DEET and possibly for use in agrigulture.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 21, 2011
at 07:02 PM

Thanks for this!

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 21, 2011
at 06:34 PM

Dr. Bronner's Peppermint soap is great for keeping away ticks. Water it down and spray your gear too.

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18 Answers

3
C33e8c236e72d67c4b6c028401d23cce

(1884)

on April 21, 2011
at 06:36 PM

The most paleo pesticide would be your mouth. ;)

But aside from that I'm out of ideas. Great question, by the way.

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on April 21, 2011
at 10:03 PM

I eat bugs, it's super paleo and although I know it's not true I feel like I'm scaring them off

2
64242a1130eb51f4852f78beed38b3d5

(1343)

on April 21, 2011
at 09:18 PM

Geckos. House Geckos.

2
2f931662684a7747be36255c8b486228

(1049)

on April 21, 2011
at 09:04 PM

ketones!! I've read of peoples experiences of not being bitten while in ketosis. There is also a new bug repellent being tested based on ketone ingredients of some kind. This summer, I will surely be eating even fewer carbs..just to prove to my skeptic husband that the paleo diet has a myriad of positive aspects.

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on April 21, 2011
at 10:04 PM

I have a fly fishing buddy. He eats straight up SAD and I eat paleo. When we're on the water he gets eaten alive and I barely get touched. There might be something to this...

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on February 19, 2012
at 03:24 PM

That's awesome! One year I went to the boy-scouts I brought lots of candy with me. After one week, my legs were a big mess : bug bite everywhere. I couldn't stop scratching. Finally I know why :D.

1
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on February 19, 2012
at 05:09 PM

Here are some ideas for those of us who have no gecko.

Things I've found helpful:

Not using anything with chemical scents (which means no toiletries from stores).

Not eating sugar or fruit

I find, most of the time, that bugs will fly around me, but not bite.


Things I've heard reported by hunters:

Not drinking alcohol.

Not bathing or showering


I have found that plants such as rosemary, lavender, and other herbs with strong smells help deter rodents. I also make bags of nylon net filled with human hair and hang them around outside to deter squirrels and chipmunks, etc.

Growing onions and garlic helps deter some insects.


Here are some links with information on plants which repel insects:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_repellent_plants

http://www.wildernesscollege.com/plants-that-repel-mosquitoes.html

Excerpted from that last link:

Cultivated Plants That Repel Mosquitoes

Citronella Grass (Cymbopogon nardus) is the most popular cultivated plant used for repelling mosquitoes. Its oil, citronella oil, is the primary ingredient in most natural insect repellents sold in stores. Products applied to the skin are most effective. It grows in tropical regions. Floridata.com has great info about Citronella grass.

Catnip (Nepeta cataria) is a common garden plant that can be used to repel mosquitoes. The crushed plant can be applied directly to the skin or the dried plant can be infused in an oil, such as olive oil. There is an interesting article about research conducted on the mosquito-repelling qualities of catnip.

Additional cultivated plants that repel mosquitoes:

Peppermint (Mentha piperita) Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Marigolds (Tagetes spp.) Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) Garlic (Allium sativum) Clove (Syzygium aromaticum) Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.) Tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) Lavendar (Lavandula angustifolia )

Wild Plants That Repel Mosquitoes

Vanilla Leaf (Achlys triphylla) is a plant native to the northwest and Japan. Indigenous peoples were known to hang bundles of the dried plants in and around their dwellings to keep mosquitoes and flies away. The plant can be rubbed on the skin fresh or dried to deter mosquitoes. I think its interesting that it often grows in shady, moist areas - the very places where mosquitoes can be the thickest. Sagebrush, Wormwood, and Mugwort (Artemisia spp.) are in the same genus (plant grouping). All of these species can be used as an aromatic smudge that is known to be a very effective mosquito repellent. The crushed leaves can also be applied directly to the skin. These species grow in the drier habitats of the west, including the plains, deserts, and mountainous regions.

Pineapple weed (Matricaria matricarioides) (pictured above) is a common weedy species that grows all over North America. It can be found growing in lawns, edges of roads, and other disturbed areas. The aromatic crushed plant can be applied to the skin to help repel mosquitoes.

Additional wild plants known to repel mosquitoes: Nodding onion (Allium cernuum) Wild bergamot (Mondarda fistulosa) Snowbrush (Ceonothus velutinus) Sweetfern (Comptonia peregrina) Cedars (Thuja spp.)

Its important to note that insect repellents applied to the skin generally only last one to two hours. Frequent re-application is necessary. Also, when utilizing wild plants, internally or externally, always be sure to correctly identify the plant you are going to use. It is best to utilize field guides and work with someone who knows the plant well to avoid accidentally using a poisonous look-alike.

Additional Tips on Repelling Mosquitoes

In addition to using mosquito repelling plants, you may want to consider some other factors that can help keep mosquitoes away. Mosquitoes find their prey by following carbon dioxide and other components that animals breath out. Many outdoors-people have noticed that mosquitoes have a greater attraction to people that have been eating processed, sugary foods, and less attracted to people eating more of a natural diet such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. The processed food diet may make your odor and blood chemistry more attractive to mosquitoes. You can choose to eat less processed foods and sugars during the mosquito season. Additionally, diets high in garlic and onions have been noted to help reduce the attraction of mosquitoes.

http://www.herbcompanion.com/gardening/fresh-clips-herbs-to-repel-insects.aspx

Best of luck to you!

1
E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 23, 2011
at 01:06 AM

For repellent, I grow a plant called lemon balm which is similar to (or contains) citronella. It grows like a weed (kind of invasive but easy to keep in check if you don't let it go to seed) and I just crush the leaves in my hands and smudge it around my face and on my clothes, etc.

For safe home pesticide for bugs, diatomaceous earth (DE) is great. Because it's a fine dust, you don't want to put it where pets can inhale it into their lungs (DE mine workers can come down with silicosis) but the food grade variety is inexpensive, a great natural pesticide and very safe. Some use it as a dietary supplement as well, since silica can also fill in suitably for calcium and improve hair, nail and bone growth. Lots of info about it on the interwebbies, so I won't post links in case they might look like product endorsements ;)

As for bigger pests... I once froze a mouse to death but that's a very long story. I use the toxic stuff for them when the feral cats (i'm in the country) don't do the trick.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 19, 2012
at 04:59 PM

RPS, I put pots of lemon balm by the doors to help keep mosquito varmints from getting into the house.

1
B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on April 22, 2011
at 01:33 AM

EAT garlic.

Bugs don't like to bite you. Weeeee.

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on April 22, 2011
at 05:51 AM

they still like to bite me and my girls, but not my hubby and we all eat lots of garlic.

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on April 23, 2011
at 06:34 PM

Hmm, it's not a cure all. Blood type is also a major factor in bug-biting preference. :(

1
8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 21, 2011
at 11:37 PM

Coffee is a decent pesticide (why people put old grounds in their gardens).

Not really paleo, but you see people really liking it. And drinking the stuff usually correlates to living longer (although I would not take the odds on whether the coffee content has anything to do with that).

1
A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 21, 2011
at 06:47 PM

There is a company called Cedarcide.com and they sell a spray called "Best Yet" which is what we use on our dogs and on ourselves for mosquitos (fleas and ticks for dogs). It is human friendly, very effective and doesn't harm the dogs either (unlike that horrid flea killer crap they sell). It is made of cedar oil and hydrated silica. We live in the PNW, tons of mosquitos and this stuff really works for us and I don't feel guilty spraying it all over myself or animals for fear of poison...

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 21, 2011
at 07:02 PM

Thanks for this!

1
Medium avatar

(12379)

on April 21, 2011
at 06:30 PM

Bug spray - citronella oil - and not the cheap crap you buy in the regular store - oil of citronella worked for me for protection from black flies, horseflies and mosquitoes (in both northern canada and thailand)

Pesticides - really species specific - aphids don't like soap etc. etc. Do you have any pests that you are trying to avoid in particular? And on what (tomatoes, strawberries etc.)?

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 21, 2011
at 06:34 PM

Dr. Bronner's Peppermint soap is great for keeping away ticks. Water it down and spray your gear too.

0
A827bdfe22cd072aaa96fedab31c7b24

on June 16, 2014
at 10:03 AM

According to me most paleo approach would be utilizing organic pest control method. Last my, when my bedroom was badly infested with the bed bugs and was looking for any reliable organic pest control. Thankfully a friend of mine who work at exterminator brooklyn helped me in getting them out with their heat treatment.

0
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on February 19, 2012
at 04:48 PM

Toads and frogs? They eat bugs, but I'm not sure how you get them to stick around.

0
4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on February 19, 2012
at 04:34 PM

Smear a nice thick layer of bear fat over exposed skin.

0
0f22cb0cc7f63dd8be2004e7d0df6348

on February 19, 2012
at 02:52 PM

Bugs include stink bugs, leaffooted bugs, and squash bugs that have piercing mouthparts used to ‘suck’ nutrients from plant leaves, stems, and fruit. They often are KEY PESTS that feed on tomatoes, beans, and squash causing discolored spotting, pimples or desiccation. The adults are excellent fliers and can move long distances into and among gardens. There are few natural controls limiting their numbers and damaging populations must be treated with insecticides.

Recommended Control: Use row covers to prevent bugs from feeding on young plantings, but remove at first flower. Kill nymphs and adults with cyfluthrin, diazinon, dimethoate, or endosulfan. ORGANIC control methods include the use of row covers, hand picking, traps, and spraying with neem or pyrethrum. Nymphs can be killed with insecticidal soap. Spray applications must be directed towards the feeding sites under the leaves and under the plant canopy. The SQUASH BUG is a perennial pest, primarily of squash and pumpkin, which should be controlled by initiating insecticide applications or hand picking when adults or egg masses are first noted on plants. For more information, click here,

pest control

0
E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on July 20, 2011
at 02:31 PM

Just read something that sounds interesting on a natural gardening site about controlling mosquitos outdoors - like on your patio for example. Haven't tried it yet, but I will this weekend: Natural Mosquito Repellents

0
3f3c952a1a31a12fc2ac49528888c073

(135)

on July 20, 2011
at 02:25 PM

My neighbor recommended I take Vitamin B2 or one of the B's. Several years ago she got eaten up by chiggers, and afterwards her doctor recommended she take a B supplement. She said she hasn't been bitten in 20 yrs.

Anyone heard of this?

I realize maybe taking a supplement isn't all that paleo but maybe you get more of that when you eat more paleo type foods...

--Matt

5cbd326041fead0c1ec71fbd106ef083

on July 20, 2011
at 03:38 PM

My brother heard that, and tried it last year. He said for the 2 people in his family that are mosquito-magnets, it did reduce the number of bites. For the other 2 that rarely get bit, they had the same (small) number.

3f3c952a1a31a12fc2ac49528888c073

(135)

on July 22, 2011
at 12:13 PM

Interesting thanks...

0
Bf72f771a19f3a3789f7fdf24c86daef

on April 22, 2011
at 05:20 AM

specifically for mosquitoes and blood-sucking little critters..

--> when our family goes camping, we always follow this advice= avoid anything sweet for the duration of the trip. it's because mosquitoes can literally smell the sweetness off our skin, and it attracts them.

0
Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on April 21, 2011
at 08:43 PM

We've read that spraying vodka on your person works, but haven't tested it yet.

03281912f1cb9e4e771a8a83af302e3a

(1204)

on April 23, 2011
at 03:02 PM

What if you drink enough of it to seep through your pores?

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 21, 2011
at 10:18 PM

I will have to try that tonight.

C1c86f42410cd4788bd9c5cf801dcd8f

(2246)

on April 22, 2011
at 11:44 AM

Just stay away from open flame...

0
002d074ab094fefc344bf0d1f36091ec

on April 21, 2011
at 06:51 PM

I heard that grapefruit oil is good for warding off mosquitos. I bought a spray bottle of the California Baby repellant, and am testing it out on my daughter who is 3. So far, good results. It has citronella, lemongrass, and cedar, and is 100% natural. I bought mine at Target.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 21, 2011
at 07:03 PM

They just had a report on this yesterday on the radio - they're developing it as a replacement for DEET and possibly for use in agrigulture.

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Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!