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Perpetual Soup cooking too hot?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 13, 2012 at 5:06 PM

I'm attempting to make my first bone broth using a whole chicken carcass, following the perpetual soup recipe. What I did was cooked the chicken first (by itself, lemon-herb style) in a newly-purchased 7-quart Crock Pot-brand slow cooker, then took all the meat out and added water (to about half full) and peppercorns. Cooking on the LOW setting.

The issue I'm having is that it seems like it's getting way too hot, constantly bubbling around the lid and actually spraying water out of the pot around the edges and running down the outside onto the counter.

It also seemed like the chicken cooked really fast in this new pot. I bought it because the first one I got in November is a 4.5-quart round version, and of course it doesn't hold much. I've been reading a lot about making bone broth and so I got this new one to add to the arsenal, but it seems to cook a bit hotter than the other one.

With the chicken, I got the impression that perhaps there just wasn't enough food in the 7-quart pot to justify using it, so it might have cooked it quicker than if it had been loaded down with veggies and such. I had only put about an inch of water in with it along with some extra chicken hearts and gizzards, plus herbs and lemon. On the LOW setting, it was completely cooked and had fallen apart after just 5 hours.

Now I've taken out all the meat, cracked up the bones, added water to about half full at first, then started it up again on the LOW setting. Within 1.5 hours it was bubbling and going a bit nuts, so I stirred it and added another quart of water. That was just 3 hours ago, and as I'm typing the lid is in there shaking and I can hear water leaking out as it comes in contact with the hot outside part of the pot.

Busted Crock Pot? Busted broth? Leave it alone it's fine I'm being too paranoid? Thoughts?

Oh, and for anyone attempting the math: yes, I have been up all night. SO is a night nurse half the week so we sleep a lot during the day (in a blacked out room of course), but I had hoped to be in bed about 5 hours ago if it weren't for this thing. Sigh. Any help would be very appreciated!

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on February 03, 2012
at 04:22 PM

I ended up taking it back to the store, I think it was defective. Decided just to stick with the one slow-cooker for now and after a few more weeks I've had good results with several more pots of broth.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on January 14, 2012
at 05:38 AM

Oh, and I'll have to shop around for a good thermometer, I keep coming up for more reasons to get one. Thanks again for the feedback.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on January 14, 2012
at 05:37 AM

Thanks for the response Nance! The chicken ended up delicious, it just seemed to make a lot of noise while it was cooking. The broth is wonderful, and after I read your reply (about 12 hours ago) I turned it down to warm and set my alarm for 2 hours and laid down on the couch. Since I knew the gf would be up soon, I just switched it back and forth from warm to low until she was up. Tonight I'm transferring it to the other pot to keep it going, it just seems like this new pot cooks a little warmer (almost like LOW = HIGH) but I guess that could be just because it's bigger. Dunno.

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3 Answers

1
6342765995f9abeac41445d4fee8ca3d

on January 14, 2012
at 02:43 PM

The newer crockpots tend to cook very hot. I'd recommend getting an older one (70s or 80s) at a thrift store or yard sale.

0
Eeb55c360bea1c6ad036edc15a33be19

on January 19, 2012
at 01:58 AM

I'm just now researching all this myself.

When my rice cooker sputters around the edges, I make a seal by folding a damp paper towel between the lid and the side of the pot.

I've heard that the newer slow cookers do cook hotter than the old ones. Here's a link on safe temperatures to keep food from spoiling: http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/safetysanitation/p/slowcooksafe.htm

Some people use something like a lamp dimmer to make a new heater cook lower.

0
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 13, 2012
at 05:26 PM

First, the 5-hour cooking time for the whole chicken seems fine to me.

If your broth/bones are going nuts after 1.5 hours on low that does seem a little hot; when I cook something all day on low I do find it goes at a slow boil rather than a simmer so I usually cycle to the Warm setting. In fact, once it's hot if your Warm setting has no automatic timed shut-off that's the way many of us go with slow-cookers. If I think it's not hot enough, I go back to Low for a while but Warm frequently does the trick.

Do you have an instant-read thermometer with a remote probe and metal cable? If so, you can verify the temp at which your food is cooking on low and call the manufacturer. If the slow-cooker isn't working properly there's probably a warranty since it's new.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on January 14, 2012
at 05:38 AM

Oh, and I'll have to shop around for a good thermometer, I keep coming up for more reasons to get one. Thanks again for the feedback.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on January 14, 2012
at 05:37 AM

Thanks for the response Nance! The chicken ended up delicious, it just seemed to make a lot of noise while it was cooking. The broth is wonderful, and after I read your reply (about 12 hours ago) I turned it down to warm and set my alarm for 2 hours and laid down on the couch. Since I knew the gf would be up soon, I just switched it back and forth from warm to low until she was up. Tonight I'm transferring it to the other pot to keep it going, it just seems like this new pot cooks a little warmer (almost like LOW = HIGH) but I guess that could be just because it's bigger. Dunno.

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