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How do you tame a tabasco pepper?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 05, 2012 at 4:27 PM

I've been growing quite a variety of peppers this year. The hottest is the Tabasco variety, which oddly grows straight up. Its even hotter due to the hot weather we have been having here. I did a very stupid thing today, and bit tiny piece off the tip of one. Felt like my chest was on fire and had to cough. I later find out its 50,000 at least scosdale unit high on the heat scale. Does frying it (with goggles on for the fumes) reduce the heat to earthly levels?

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on August 06, 2012
at 12:53 PM

If you aren't up to more than a drop of tabasco sauce, give them to a heat loving friend. I've seen beautiful ropes or wreaths made of dried tabascos and other hot peppers. Or just enjoy the beauty of the plant.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 06, 2012
at 12:45 PM

I'm sure habanero is great for the slow digestion. ;-p

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 06, 2012
at 12:42 AM

I've already gone through and touched my eye before after handling cayennes. I won't repeat that again. Sandpaper in eye feeling!

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 06, 2012
at 12:41 AM

I'm thinking of adding some to a sauce, or curry, but I don't want to overpower it. Prehaps just use have of one? Not sure what I do with the rest of them. I have a whole plant of them!

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 06, 2012
at 12:29 AM

Also, that white pith is called "placenta," a bit of trivia I love, for some reason.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 06, 2012
at 12:28 AM

Good to know! Kosher I am familiar with, coconut products I am not. :)

Medium avatar

(2923)

on August 05, 2012
at 11:00 PM

Or Ghost Peppers ...

Medium avatar

(2923)

on August 05, 2012
at 10:59 PM

And as one Thai cook told our class, "Wash your hands after handling chiles. Especially men!" ...

Medium avatar

(2923)

on August 05, 2012
at 10:58 PM

Coconut oil (and coconut cream) should be just fine and both go really well with spicy food.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:25 PM

Yes, they would be hot, as is the nature of tabasco peppers. Just use a small amount or tame them by using a mix with milder peppers.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:19 PM

Sorry, not kosher myself so I don't know all the rules. Coconut oil might work?

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:03 PM

Another fat would still work with your chicken, yes! Though peppery butter is great and you should try it on your fish, broccoli or potato (if you eat them) to keep it kosher.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on August 05, 2012
at 04:57 PM

You get used to the heat. You'll be eating Blair's Death sauces in no time :)

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 05, 2012
at 04:56 PM

I can't cook butter and chicken together. Its not kosher. Would another type of oil have the same affect? Or should I just vinegars?

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 05, 2012
at 04:42 PM

Wouldn't those sauces be exceptionally hot? Or just tiny drop of the sauce at a time for heat?

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5 Answers

3
61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 05, 2012
at 04:50 PM

Acid and/or fat. Vinegars are a good acid source that goes well with hot peppers (one reason it's in Tabasco sauce!) as are using the peppers in a citrus juice marinade like chile-lime or a Cuban mojo style with orange juice, lime, garlic and the peppers.

Dairy also tends to be acidic, and has fat too, so if you do dairy sour cream or Greek yogurt is also a good way to keep the heat from getting redonkulous.

2
Medium avatar

(2923)

on August 05, 2012
at 04:57 PM

Growing in cooler moister conditions and near milder varieties of peppers will reduce the heat levels (although the milder varieties will have higher heat levels than usual from cross polination).

Cooking with smaller quantities and removing the seeds will reduce the heat levels in the dishes. And you can build up heat tolerance fairly quickly, easiest is slowly adding more and more drops of Tabasco Hot Sauce to scrambled eggs in the morning.

Post-consumption, the one guaranteed thing that will tame the heat is dairy fat (hope you're not lactose or casein intolerant) -- butter, heavy cream, sour cream, yogurt, cheese. The heat of chiles is in the capsaicin oil, so water will do nothing to cool the heat. And carbonated beverages and alcohol will increase the sensation of heat.

1
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:16 PM

The tip of any pepper will have the least concentration of capsaicin - eating the whole thing would've been a worse experience for you!

Contrary to popular myth, the seeds have zero capsaicin; however the white pith (that the seeds are connected to) will have the highest concentration.

For small peppers, I suggest slicing them open, sliding the knife under the pith, and then continuing from there. Other than that, I've found using oil cooking with hot peppers seems to increase the heat, not lessen it. Always use the appropriate pepper for the dish you are preparing - there's no going back once hot peppers are added! :-)

Medium avatar

(2923)

on August 05, 2012
at 10:59 PM

And as one Thai cook told our class, "Wash your hands after handling chiles. Especially men!" ...

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 06, 2012
at 12:29 AM

Also, that white pith is called "placenta," a bit of trivia I love, for some reason.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 06, 2012
at 12:42 AM

I've already gone through and touched my eye before after handling cayennes. I won't repeat that again. Sandpaper in eye feeling!

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2012
at 04:49 PM

First, get them when they are yellow or light orange. This will keep them at closer to 25k scoville scale which is hot, but manageable. Obviously remove seeds and stems.

Dicing, and cooking in butter (then blend) makes a very spicy, but tasty sauce for chicken. The butter provides a good damper for the heat.

Also pickle and then dry and crush into a powder to be used in a rub. a little goes a long way!

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 05, 2012
at 04:56 PM

I can't cook butter and chicken together. Its not kosher. Would another type of oil have the same affect? Or should I just vinegars?

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:03 PM

Another fat would still work with your chicken, yes! Though peppery butter is great and you should try it on your fish, broccoli or potato (if you eat them) to keep it kosher.

Medium avatar

(2923)

on August 05, 2012
at 10:58 PM

Coconut oil (and coconut cream) should be just fine and both go really well with spicy food.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:19 PM

Sorry, not kosher myself so I don't know all the rules. Coconut oil might work?

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 06, 2012
at 12:28 AM

Good to know! Kosher I am familiar with, coconut products I am not. :)

1
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on August 05, 2012
at 04:35 PM

You don't try to tame tabasco peppers. Just only eat them in small quantities as seasoning in a dish (cook in dish, then remove if you're heat sensitive) or make sauce. http://www.mexican-barbecue-recipes.com/tabasco-hot-sauce-recipes.html

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on August 06, 2012
at 12:53 PM

If you aren't up to more than a drop of tabasco sauce, give them to a heat loving friend. I've seen beautiful ropes or wreaths made of dried tabascos and other hot peppers. Or just enjoy the beauty of the plant.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 05, 2012
at 04:42 PM

Wouldn't those sauces be exceptionally hot? Or just tiny drop of the sauce at a time for heat?

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 06, 2012
at 12:41 AM

I'm thinking of adding some to a sauce, or curry, but I don't want to overpower it. Prehaps just use have of one? Not sure what I do with the rest of them. I have a whole plant of them!

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:25 PM

Yes, they would be hot, as is the nature of tabasco peppers. Just use a small amount or tame them by using a mix with milder peppers.

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