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Nutritional Sciences major seeking academics or those who like scientific literature

Answered on September 03, 2014
Created September 01, 2014 at 7:21 AM

Been a few years since I posted, but I think I'll find some good information in the community.

I'm a Nutrition major, on the Nutritional Sciences track, not the Dietetics one. Almost done with my degree.

Anyways, for one of my classes this semester, we have a persuasive position paper taking sides on a specific topic. There were a bunch to choose from, but I chose "Gluten free eating is not a fad," naturally.

I'm curious, what's your favorite/most persuasive/best scientific (preferably peer reviewed) piece of writing that makes the case to drop gluten?

I'm researching myself, but I think someone will link me to something that's awesome.

Thanks guys and gals!

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6 Answers

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 01, 2014
at 02:05 PM

I'm not sure gluten is the enemy though. There's really little (to none) literature out there looking at gluten in non-celiacs. And the recent follow-up from the same group pretty much obliterated gluten "sensitivity" as a thing. Now if you use gluten-avoidance to eliminate other problematic dietary components (e.g. FODMAPs, refined/processed foods…) you'll have a better chance of finding some meaningful literature. 

Sure, you can lead with 'gluten-free diets are good' but follow that up with 'but gluten is not the problem.' 

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on September 02, 2014
at 02:19 PM

gluten is a classic "dose makes poison" case. Most people eat wheat as a staple and will get hit often with 400 calories worth of pasta, which is unfermented wheat. There are people in this forum that think a small piece of bread is worse than a large bunch of raw kale in a smoothie, but the reverse is true for most people. All vegetable foods are toxic to same extent. The other issue is what is a celiac exactly, since "celiac" is the tail of a gluten intolerance distribution, above a certain threshold.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 02, 2014
at 02:32 PM

There are protective poisons in grains but gluten is not one of them. It's a suboptimal protein for humans because of relatively low digestibility. I doubt that the partially digested remains are toxic to most people who are not celiac.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 02, 2014
at 02:56 PM

Folks really need to stop calling foods 'toxins'. 

A155371f58ad79bd7a858c8491b5c31a

(145)

on September 02, 2014
at 10:59 PM

Thanks Matt,

Do you include gluten in your diet? Curious based on your reply.

The position is that gluten free diets are NOT a fad. If I went down the path of explaining why gluten isn't necessarily the problem, that would somewhat render the position useless, as I'm no longer talking about gluten, you think?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 03, 2014
at 12:21 AM

I'm not strict paleo. When I eat out (rarely), I don't try and paleo-ize my meal. So some gluten sneaks in now and then. 

Gluten-free is a fad, the benefits of gluten-free isn't from being free of gluten, but reducing other problematic dietary components. It's right for the wrong reason. That's a more interesting paper to write I think! 

A155371f58ad79bd7a858c8491b5c31a

(145)

on September 03, 2014
at 12:27 AM

Ahhh, well you just said it is a fad! I guess my stance could be it isn't a fad in the sense that people are benefiting from the exclusion of X, Y, and Z as a direct result of eliminating gluten.

I'm just trying to figure out how to effectively incorporate the points you've made into an effective argument that says why GF is NOT a fad.

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on September 03, 2014
at 04:46 AM

"There's really little (to none) literature out there looking at gluten in non-celiacs."  Except perhaps, for the work of Dr. Alessio Fasano of Harvard and his friends?

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on September 03, 2014
at 06:47 AM

you could tweek Matt' comment of "Gluten-free is a fad, the benefits of gluten-free isn't from being free of gluten, but reducing other problematic dietary components. It's right for the wrong reason."

by adding two words to align with your stance of gf in not a fad, & make it,

"Gluten-free is Not a fad, But the benefits of gluten-free isn't from being free of gluten, but reducing other problematic dietary components. It's right for the wrong reason."

... not that helpful really ...?

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on September 03, 2014
at 06:57 AM

or,

"Gluten-free is Not a fad, However the benefits of gluten-free isn't from being free of gluten, but reducing other problematic dietary components. It's right for the wrong reason."

{i see the edit (& delete) function has disappeared (at present) with the new platform}

0
13f174d097c9293ed7d079dba783217c

on September 03, 2014
at 10:57 PM

Alessio fasano. done and done. 

0
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 03, 2014
at 07:06 PM

These aren't by any means "the best" sources you can find, but they're pretty fascinating articles, and you can dig deeper by referring to the sources if you scroll down to the bottom of both of them:

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/dark-side-wheat-new-perspectives-celiac-disease-wheat-intolerance-sayer-ji

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/opening-pandoras-bread-box-critical-role-wheat-lectin-human-disease

 

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 01, 2014
at 01:16 PM

You might want to follow the digestibility literature. Vegetable proteins present undigested anti nutrients.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23107545

Whether these are harmful or not is worth digging in to. But on the surface, the poor uptake of legume and grain proteins is inefficient use of the food.

Here's another reference which indexes many proteins. Gluten ranks last in quality.

http://www.jssm.org/vol3/n3/2/v3n3-2pdf.pdf

A155371f58ad79bd7a858c8491b5c31a

(145)

on September 02, 2014
at 11:19 PM

Taken from that abstract: "Digestibility and the quality of mixed diets in developing countries are considerably lower than of those in developed regions. For example, the digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94 %)."

It's interesting, but the study basically says that underdeveloped regions of the world have much lower protein digestibility (based on less processed grains and legume foods). 

If the protein digestibility they refer to is strictly plant sourced protein (not including animal protein), then I'd say the paper makes more of a case for the refinement of grains/legumes.

I don't really see how I could use that paper to say why one should avoid gluten altogether.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 02, 2014
at 11:38 PM

The articles show why gluten is not anywhere close to an optimal source of protein. That's reason enough to support the endurance of gluten-free foods. I'm against using the alarmist literature to buttress your argument, and gave you something peer reviewed that supports your argument. What more do you want?

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 01, 2014
at 12:15 PM

Search Stephan's site: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com

His work is more on brain responses to eating hyper-palatable foods.  And has good write-ups on the Paleo Diet Cinical Trials.

 

None are directed towards gluten free, but if you parse through the results, you can make some observations.

 

 

 

-1
E3bf4144d93276ff13b4264af27eafd5

on September 01, 2014
at 09:11 AM

Hello there, From the books I have had the opportunity to read about nutrition from a paleo or paleoish perspective, I think that grain brain would be the one that could approach your subject in the most complete manner. The author knows his stuff very well, from both personnal and professional experience. Also podcasts and interviews with him are often very interesting. Otherwise, if you are looking for something more brief than a whole book on the subject, the perfect health diet has a long chapter about grains, and covers all the damaging effects of gluten and other damaging protein and immune responses triggered by grain consumption. The chapter is very direct and full of specific references to studies and articles, that could give you some good arguments to dig into. I am guessing that many blogs and articles that review these two books would provide you with summarized information, although both of these books are very good reads, definitely worth the while

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 02, 2014
at 02:40 PM

Grane brane...or brainzzzz... Use of alarmist texts as references is a good way to get an F on a paper. Unless you can treat them as a joke.

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