2

votes

Paleo pasta: has anyone found a substitute ingredient for flour that produces a decent parody of normal egg pasta?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 08, 2011 at 1:50 AM

I am looking to make an acceptable tasting and textured pasta without flour. Ground flaxseed maybe?

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on April 04, 2013
at 08:07 PM

Substitutes will NEVER taste the same as wheat pasta, but these are a pretty good stand in. I like them in stir fries and some other dishes, but they disappoint with tomato sauce (taste great with my hubby's homemade smoked salmon pasta sauce, though).

Ee957129d157b9b1225b52131f098e63

(60)

on November 17, 2011
at 12:45 PM

Only thing, if you're expecting a soft noodle texture, you'll be dissapointed. Very crunchy. Funny enough i just ordered the konjac root noodles.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:57 PM

Here's how I see it. I posted an answer which was very appropriate for the question. I was down-voted and my answer was criticized initially with a comment that was not only unsubstantiated, but completely incorrect. Then you came in to back him up, but your criticism was unwarranted as well, as I think I have explained. Your very first post was a reiteration of a statement that's absolutely not true. I think it's reasonable, as the original person who spent the time to post a constructive answer, to be a little frustrated at being attacked for it. I'm not the one posting on your answer.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:33 PM

I actually never downvoted you. Don't jump down my throat cause someone else downvoted you. I never did specify "optimal" because to me, paleo = optimal, not a re-creation. Listen, I've eaten cassava and likely will again. Will i ever eat it regularly? No. As a hack, i do think it's perfectly fine, but I was pointing out that there *are* potential concerns for regular consumption and frankly I felt like everyone lambasted me.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:19 PM

I missed your point? Maybe that's because that's a point you never made. Also, you seem to have missed the point of the original question AND my post. Not only did I specifically say I didn't eat it regularly, but that the question was about a pasta substitute, not the "most optimal" food. In response to a perfectly reasonable answer, I get down-voted and lambasted on the completely indefensible position that a tuber (one eaten by native peoples for over thousands of years) is not "paleo." No one said it was "optimal." Robb Wolf did say it was "fine" though. Why don't you take it up with him?

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:08 PM

"Cassava is fine." - Robb Wolf.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:00 PM

I missed your point? You missed the point of the original question AND my post. Not only did I specifically say I didn't eat it regularly, but that the question was about a pasta substitute, not the "most optimal" food. In response to a perfectly reasonable answer, I get down-voted and lambasted on the completely indefensible position that a tuber (one eaten by native peoples for over thousands of years) is not "paleo." No one said it was "optimal."

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 03:54 PM

actually, losterman, I'm just not going to bother to continue arguing with someone who can't see the difference between an inherent certainty and a externally affected probability. Additionally, he completely misses my point, which is, while it may be 'paleo' in that it was eaten by our distant ancestors, it's not necessarily optimal, particularly when eaten regularly.

Fe6e37f8d4c49de1ecbc926c8900cd54

(1902)

on May 09, 2011
at 02:21 PM

@Forrest: Haha, win.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:47 AM

1) Neither situation is basis for judging something paleo or not. 2) Your own articles as well as many of the ones I read last year when I was ordering this flour are very specific about who is at risk. If you have a computer in your house, it's not you.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:40 AM

no,' if its allowed to spoil' is different from being INHERENTLY present from the beginning. I guess my faith in industrial processing plants is not what yours is.... i agree. continuing to argue is silly.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:38 AM

well, sure, i've eaten Fugu for crying out loud, at a sushi restaurant I used to work at. The thing is, if you're not preparing it, you can't be sure and I personally get enough trace chemical exposure in modern life.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:36 AM

People in 3rd world countries have problems with poorly processed cassava...mainly because they're doing it themselves. Read the article you posted. They're exposed to cyanide while processing it themselves. People in the US are ordering cassava flour made in a processing facility, where it is done safely and thoroughly. And yes, -all- meat can be inherently dangerous if it is allowed to spoil. That doesn't make it non-paleo. Continuing to argue this point is ridiculous.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:36 AM

Paleo Bubble-Tea party starts NOW dudes!!

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:34 AM

I for one am not going to say no to a few tapioca noodles if they are presented to me.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:33 AM

It's a problem for people who eat as the main source of nutrients. To quote the article you linked: "In Africa, improperly processed cassava is a major problem. It's associated with a number of cyanide-related health disorders, particularly among people who are already malnourished." "People who get little or no protein in their diets are particularly susceptible to cyanide poisoning, as they lack the proper amino acids necessary to help detoxify the poison." Thankfully, it's a rare paleo-ite that lacks protein. The people that suffer from the poisoning eat cassava every day.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:31 AM

meat does NOT *inherently* 100% of the time contain something potentially deadly. Cassava does. Big difference.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:30 AM

look up cassava poisoning. i'm not fear mongering. People suffer regularly from eating it... I mean,I don't care if you eat it, but it DOES contain something that can be potentially fatal, and people DO die from eating it. Those are just facts. Sorry if you don't like them.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:23 AM

By your argument, meat is not paleo because it can spoil. Baking/cooking/soaking cassava eliminates any danger from eating it. Please stop fear-mongering.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:22 AM

Cyanide is a pretty deadly poison. it's not like it's just going to make you sneeze a bit. It can kill you.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:19 AM

Cyanide is a pretty deadly poison, kids.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:18 AM

huh? the thing that doesn't make it paleo in my mind is that the plant contains a substance which, when eaten, can produce cyanide in your body. Proper processing SHOULD eliminate this, but unless you're gonna test it for trace amounts, they COULD still be there. Your body has high tolerances for lots of poisons and can work them out of its system, but that doesn't mean those poisons should be there to begin with. Additionally frequent eating IS causing problems in some populations. I mean, by your argument, you could say people everywhere eat sourdough wheat and are arguably fine.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:16 AM

wait, so in order for a thing to be paleo, all parts of the plant or animal have to be non-poisonous, pre-processing, in any stage of growth?

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:16 AM

You're saying because some people didn't prepare cassava flour correctly, it's not paleo? What kind of logic is that? Plenty of improperly prepared foods can kill you.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:14 AM

i mean, not that numbers of people consuming a thing makes it 'paleo', but that poor processing can't make it not...

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:12 AM

how do you know it was processed properly? if you're talking about trace amounts, it could still be a problem.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:10 AM

let's talk about properly processed tapioca, shall we? many millions of people eat cassava as a daily staple.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:07 AM

I only learned about this recently watching No Reservations... That Anthony Bourdain... what a guy

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:03 AM

no, no, its not paleo because of this: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030514080833.htm

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:58 AM

looks like i missed forrest's answer below -- there are indeed tapioca noodles in the world!

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:51 AM

Manioc root, from which tapioca and cassava flour are made, has a similar GI to sweet potatoes. It's been eaten by natives of South America and Africa for many thousands of years. If it's not paleo, then neither are sweet potatoes, and you're playing a semantics game. All starches should be eaten in careful moderation. But that wasn't the question that was asked.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:46 AM

though maybe someone will still ask....

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:44 AM

pretty sure cyanide is not paleo :)

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:43 AM

@ Dr.K tapioca is an ancient food; starch from tubers. i can't see how you reckon this is a terribly distant extrapolation from a seaweed re-config, or coconut flour. carboliciousness aside, it is no less 'paleo'.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:43 AM

aha... well then, maybe this is the reason http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030514080833.htm

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:36 AM

it's cassava/yuca/manioc.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:15 AM

tapioca is decidedly not paleo. Carbolicious and insulinogenic to boot.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 11:13 PM

you know, i think it's the name.... "tapioca" -it just sounds like some kind of mystery... if someone asked me what tapioca was, i'd have to admit i had no clue. Maybe I will play with some.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 08, 2011
at 09:24 PM

http://www.molecularrecipes.com/gelification/agar-agar-spaghetti/

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 08, 2011
at 08:24 PM

I wonder why tapioca flour is never mentioned 'round here. Tuber, non-nightshade. I've never used it.. perhaps it has undesirable properties?

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on May 08, 2011
at 06:31 PM

Potato and rice are much better than flaxseed.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 08, 2011
at 05:21 PM

I love kelp noodles but I don't have a local source. Almost forgot about them!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 08, 2011
at 03:47 PM

its tougher but if you simmer it in the sauce it rocks. I use this to make shrimp scampi.

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on May 08, 2011
at 02:47 AM

I've had these noodles (not the tofu version) and they are an acceptable substitue... see Shari's tips though for preparation

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on May 08, 2011
at 02:40 AM

oh wow thanks for the lasagna noodle tip too!

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on May 08, 2011
at 02:39 AM

upvote for the tip on the miracle noodles (shirataki). I just rinsed them last time and there was too much liquid in my curry. I save these 'noodles' for when I'm really desperate. They did work! I haven't tried them yet with an italian sauce though.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:39 AM

Just wanted to mention using sliced turkey or ham as lasagna noodles. It works very well. I used to use eggplant or zucchini which work well but the meat slices make a more lasagna-ish texture (a little firmer) and you really can't take the flavor of the meat. I usually use Organic valley sliced roast turkey or chicken in mine but the ham is good too.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:34 AM

You mean seaweed in place of spaghetti squash? How does that work?

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:28 AM

well, if you're cooking it, its way better than flax, and i certainly think potato is acceptable to a reasonable degree. Rice less so, but personally I do eat it every blue moon or so. Depends on how often you want to make this and what your goals are.

083f1759ac6bcee7cd5081f6d062c822

on May 08, 2011
at 02:19 AM

Just found a korean grocery store that sells Arrowroot noodles. Kind of similar to cellophane or rice noodles, but paleo at least

083f1759ac6bcee7cd5081f6d062c822

on May 08, 2011
at 02:18 AM

Wouldn't potato/rice flour be against paleo though?

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:10 AM

i guess i'd play with potato flour or rice flour before i went with flax anything.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:04 AM

incidentally this julienne peeler might work for this recipe... i might have to try it now!

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:04 AM

sounds like all he used was sweet potato.. unless this is a different recipe than what you mean... http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=10150116432505671

083f1759ac6bcee7cd5081f6d062c822

on May 08, 2011
at 01:59 AM

Richard Blaise on top chef made a sweet potato fettuccini which I've copied, but I'm still looking for an ingredient substitute for the flour. I like the zucchini idea and will definitely try it. Thanks!

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17 Answers

8
Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 01:55 AM

flaxseed? sorry, but that sounds icky. what you need is a julienne peeler, like this:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000CEWJD/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B0000CCY1S&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0ZVQVJ2WNMEYSS1V84BR

and a zucchini. peel the zucchini with this thing and it makes the best faux pasta i've had and its really easy.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:58 AM

looks like i missed forrest's answer below -- there are indeed tapioca noodles in the world!

083f1759ac6bcee7cd5081f6d062c822

on May 08, 2011
at 01:59 AM

Richard Blaise on top chef made a sweet potato fettuccini which I've copied, but I'm still looking for an ingredient substitute for the flour. I like the zucchini idea and will definitely try it. Thanks!

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on May 08, 2011
at 06:31 PM

Potato and rice are much better than flaxseed.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:28 AM

well, if you're cooking it, its way better than flax, and i certainly think potato is acceptable to a reasonable degree. Rice less so, but personally I do eat it every blue moon or so. Depends on how often you want to make this and what your goals are.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 08, 2011
at 08:24 PM

I wonder why tapioca flour is never mentioned 'round here. Tuber, non-nightshade. I've never used it.. perhaps it has undesirable properties?

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:46 AM

though maybe someone will still ask....

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:43 AM

aha... well then, maybe this is the reason http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030514080833.htm

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 11:13 PM

you know, i think it's the name.... "tapioca" -it just sounds like some kind of mystery... if someone asked me what tapioca was, i'd have to admit i had no clue. Maybe I will play with some.

083f1759ac6bcee7cd5081f6d062c822

on May 08, 2011
at 02:18 AM

Wouldn't potato/rice flour be against paleo though?

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:04 AM

sounds like all he used was sweet potato.. unless this is a different recipe than what you mean... http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=10150116432505671

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:44 AM

pretty sure cyanide is not paleo :)

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:04 AM

incidentally this julienne peeler might work for this recipe... i might have to try it now!

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:10 AM

i guess i'd play with potato flour or rice flour before i went with flax anything.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:36 AM

it's cassava/yuca/manioc.

5
Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 08, 2011
at 05:18 AM

Tapioca noodles are the best substitute, texture-wise, for flour pasta that I know of. I very rarely eat them - usually opt for spaghetti squash, acorn squash, or fried summer squash instead of pasta. However, if you're really dying for some noodles, try those out.

They are nothing but tapioca starch, for sale at the asian food markets.

Edit: I guess I didn't realize you meant "make from scratch." But I guess I'd still say the same thing. You might want to try getting tapioca starch or cassava flour online or from asian food markets and making pasta from that.

My best online source is:

http://www.barryfarm.com

I also get xantham gum from them to use when experimenting with root flour baking.

"Cassava is fine." - Robb Wolf

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:14 AM

i mean, not that numbers of people consuming a thing makes it 'paleo', but that poor processing can't make it not...

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:36 AM

Paleo Bubble-Tea party starts NOW dudes!!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:15 AM

tapioca is decidedly not paleo. Carbolicious and insulinogenic to boot.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:34 AM

I for one am not going to say no to a few tapioca noodles if they are presented to me.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:31 AM

meat does NOT *inherently* 100% of the time contain something potentially deadly. Cassava does. Big difference.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:07 AM

I only learned about this recently watching No Reservations... That Anthony Bourdain... what a guy

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:47 AM

1) Neither situation is basis for judging something paleo or not. 2) Your own articles as well as many of the ones I read last year when I was ordering this flour are very specific about who is at risk. If you have a computer in your house, it's not you.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:08 PM

"Cassava is fine." - Robb Wolf.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:57 PM

Here's how I see it. I posted an answer which was very appropriate for the question. I was down-voted and my answer was criticized initially with a comment that was not only unsubstantiated, but completely incorrect. Then you came in to back him up, but your criticism was unwarranted as well, as I think I have explained. Your very first post was a reiteration of a statement that's absolutely not true. I think it's reasonable, as the original person who spent the time to post a constructive answer, to be a little frustrated at being attacked for it. I'm not the one posting on your answer.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:18 AM

huh? the thing that doesn't make it paleo in my mind is that the plant contains a substance which, when eaten, can produce cyanide in your body. Proper processing SHOULD eliminate this, but unless you're gonna test it for trace amounts, they COULD still be there. Your body has high tolerances for lots of poisons and can work them out of its system, but that doesn't mean those poisons should be there to begin with. Additionally frequent eating IS causing problems in some populations. I mean, by your argument, you could say people everywhere eat sourdough wheat and are arguably fine.

Fe6e37f8d4c49de1ecbc926c8900cd54

(1902)

on May 09, 2011
at 02:21 PM

@Forrest: Haha, win.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 03:54 PM

actually, losterman, I'm just not going to bother to continue arguing with someone who can't see the difference between an inherent certainty and a externally affected probability. Additionally, he completely misses my point, which is, while it may be 'paleo' in that it was eaten by our distant ancestors, it's not necessarily optimal, particularly when eaten regularly.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:36 AM

People in 3rd world countries have problems with poorly processed cassava...mainly because they're doing it themselves. Read the article you posted. They're exposed to cyanide while processing it themselves. People in the US are ordering cassava flour made in a processing facility, where it is done safely and thoroughly. And yes, -all- meat can be inherently dangerous if it is allowed to spoil. That doesn't make it non-paleo. Continuing to argue this point is ridiculous.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:40 AM

no,' if its allowed to spoil' is different from being INHERENTLY present from the beginning. I guess my faith in industrial processing plants is not what yours is.... i agree. continuing to argue is silly.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:33 AM

It's a problem for people who eat as the main source of nutrients. To quote the article you linked: "In Africa, improperly processed cassava is a major problem. It's associated with a number of cyanide-related health disorders, particularly among people who are already malnourished." "People who get little or no protein in their diets are particularly susceptible to cyanide poisoning, as they lack the proper amino acids necessary to help detoxify the poison." Thankfully, it's a rare paleo-ite that lacks protein. The people that suffer from the poisoning eat cassava every day.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:22 AM

Cyanide is a pretty deadly poison. it's not like it's just going to make you sneeze a bit. It can kill you.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:33 PM

I actually never downvoted you. Don't jump down my throat cause someone else downvoted you. I never did specify "optimal" because to me, paleo = optimal, not a re-creation. Listen, I've eaten cassava and likely will again. Will i ever eat it regularly? No. As a hack, i do think it's perfectly fine, but I was pointing out that there *are* potential concerns for regular consumption and frankly I felt like everyone lambasted me.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:23 AM

By your argument, meat is not paleo because it can spoil. Baking/cooking/soaking cassava eliminates any danger from eating it. Please stop fear-mongering.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:51 AM

Manioc root, from which tapioca and cassava flour are made, has a similar GI to sweet potatoes. It's been eaten by natives of South America and Africa for many thousands of years. If it's not paleo, then neither are sweet potatoes, and you're playing a semantics game. All starches should be eaten in careful moderation. But that wasn't the question that was asked.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:16 AM

wait, so in order for a thing to be paleo, all parts of the plant or animal have to be non-poisonous, pre-processing, in any stage of growth?

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:38 AM

well, sure, i've eaten Fugu for crying out loud, at a sushi restaurant I used to work at. The thing is, if you're not preparing it, you can't be sure and I personally get enough trace chemical exposure in modern life.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:03 AM

no, no, its not paleo because of this: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030514080833.htm

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:16 AM

You're saying because some people didn't prepare cassava flour correctly, it's not paleo? What kind of logic is that? Plenty of improperly prepared foods can kill you.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:12 AM

how do you know it was processed properly? if you're talking about trace amounts, it could still be a problem.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:43 AM

@ Dr.K tapioca is an ancient food; starch from tubers. i can't see how you reckon this is a terribly distant extrapolation from a seaweed re-config, or coconut flour. carboliciousness aside, it is no less 'paleo'.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:19 AM

Cyanide is a pretty deadly poison, kids.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:10 AM

let's talk about properly processed tapioca, shall we? many millions of people eat cassava as a daily staple.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 09, 2011
at 01:30 AM

look up cassava poisoning. i'm not fear mongering. People suffer regularly from eating it... I mean,I don't care if you eat it, but it DOES contain something that can be potentially fatal, and people DO die from eating it. Those are just facts. Sorry if you don't like them.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:00 PM

I missed your point? You missed the point of the original question AND my post. Not only did I specifically say I didn't eat it regularly, but that the question was about a pasta substitute, not the "most optimal" food. In response to a perfectly reasonable answer, I get down-voted and lambasted on the completely indefensible position that a tuber (one eaten by native peoples for over thousands of years) is not "paleo." No one said it was "optimal."

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:19 PM

I missed your point? Maybe that's because that's a point you never made. Also, you seem to have missed the point of the original question AND my post. Not only did I specifically say I didn't eat it regularly, but that the question was about a pasta substitute, not the "most optimal" food. In response to a perfectly reasonable answer, I get down-voted and lambasted on the completely indefensible position that a tuber (one eaten by native peoples for over thousands of years) is not "paleo." No one said it was "optimal." Robb Wolf did say it was "fine" though. Why don't you take it up with him?

4
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on May 08, 2011
at 02:04 AM

Nope. People have been trying for years. It just doesn't work. You will have to find acceptance on this one as we all have had to do. Doesn't work. Never gonna work. Don't waste your time, energy, hopes and dreams thinking you'll figure it out. I guarantee you that some true culinary magicians have attempted and failed miserably. It is what it is.

Many like spaghetti squash and it's pretty good but not my favorite. My favorite gadget is my Spirooli spiralizer that makes spaghetti-type noodles out of zucchini. That is VERY good.

The shirataki is a good option as long as you don't expect it to be like a wheat pasta because it is not. It's more like a rice noodle. I much prefer it with Asian-style dishes as opposed to Italian. However, for Italian I sauce the noodles and let them sit in the fridge overnight and its much better the next day. The noodles do well with some time to absorb the sauce and they relax a bit in the process. The shirataki should be dried in a hot pan until they release a lot of liquid otherwise you feel like you are chewing rubber bands. I fry mine in a dry pan at high heat for about 20 minutes or so. If you don't do this ahead of saucing or preparing they will release their liquid into the sauce and really can water it down. And yeah, they feel like rubber bands in your mouth which I happen to find disturbing.

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on May 08, 2011
at 02:40 AM

oh wow thanks for the lasagna noodle tip too!

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on May 08, 2011
at 02:39 AM

upvote for the tip on the miracle noodles (shirataki). I just rinsed them last time and there was too much liquid in my curry. I save these 'noodles' for when I'm really desperate. They did work! I haven't tried them yet with an italian sauce though.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:39 AM

Just wanted to mention using sliced turkey or ham as lasagna noodles. It works very well. I used to use eggplant or zucchini which work well but the meat slices make a more lasagna-ish texture (a little firmer) and you really can't take the flavor of the meat. I usually use Organic valley sliced roast turkey or chicken in mine but the ham is good too.

3
072c74de4f64f3dcfc321e40403b9e87

on July 29, 2012
at 11:19 PM

I think that steamed calamari is a great substitute for noodles.

3
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on May 09, 2011
at 07:22 PM

I can't believe nobody has mentioned White Rice pasta. It's a benign starch pasta and a very decent substitute to gluten grain pasta. I got it at my local Sprouts (which is like a Farmer's market type store out here).

Two ingredients. Rice, water.

Tinkyada

Tinkyada White Spaghetti on Amazon

1
C0237fd9e277fcef496d538beda1f35b

(287)

on July 30, 2012
at 03:43 AM

Well...Tonight I made manicotti using this crepe recipe

http://fastpaleo.com/coconut-crepes/

I omitted the vanilla though since this was not going to be a sweet dessert.

Have to make sure they're spread very thin and cooked as directed or they'll tear when you're lifting them up to flip them.

Now...they held up extremely well under the sauce when I baked them...I'm guessing they might do decently if they were sliced up. Wouldn't go too thin. Maybe fettuccine width. then toss with hot marinara sauce. Wouldn't boil.

Pre-paleo, this is how I made my manicotti except with wheat flour.

I have a couple left in the fridge that I may go try this on...

WELL: I laid the flat crepes on top of each other on a cutting board and took my pizza cutter and made it into thin strips. Poured a little marinara on it and nuked it. Definitely not the same texture as wheat spaghetti, but it wasn't bad at all.

Wondering if I added some italian seasoning into the mix too...

But these would be GREAT layered in a lasagna in one of those small round casserole dishes (slightly larger than standard ramekins)

1
A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

on May 08, 2011
at 02:46 AM

FWIW.. I have also used the meat out of young coconuts, sliced thinly like noodles, in various asian soups.! Its very nice and completely Paleo.

1
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:15 AM

Coconut flour over spaghetti squash fried in butter or coconut oil.....then inane pasta sauce you want. Totally paleo and easy to do. I also use seaweed to do this too. Rocks

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 08, 2011
at 03:47 PM

its tougher but if you simmer it in the sauce it rocks. I use this to make shrimp scampi.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on May 08, 2011
at 02:34 AM

You mean seaweed in place of spaghetti squash? How does that work?

0
72fde931fbd094ed4b2a8e9b4288bab6

on April 04, 2013
at 07:11 PM

Hello :-)

I have been on Plaeo for about 4 months now. If I understand correct, tapioca and sweet potato noodles are not Paleo? :-(

0
0a14995ac154eae8242b67115c9cc6c3

(158)

on January 15, 2013
at 06:41 PM

The local Asian grocer has lots of options. They have green been "strips" that are noodle-like. Tapioca noodles, sweet potato noodles and kelp noodles. All would be good options for you.

http://www.thekitchn.com/glutenfree-asian-noodles-121367

0
B865610538c5eaf018c81885dccb3c0d

(10)

on April 17, 2012
at 04:02 PM

Anyone here tried paleo pasta - paleopasta.com? I love this stuff....any feedback?

0
1b81384cf6519d1fd092c293b050cd1f

(270)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:41 PM

+1 on the spaghetti squash or spiral cut zucchini. Spag squash is expensive where I life though. :(

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 12:24 AM

I just had Hodgson Mills brown rice and flaxseed gluten-free pasta the other night. I know the strict Paleo's say no-no to brown rice but for me, I really love my pasta sauce and I don't feel it is the same over anything else but pasta noodles. My tummy did not have any negative experiences from eating it. I'm pretty damn strict about my paleo diet, particularly the gluten part, but I also feel that sometimes we need to experience the foods we truly love. Everything in moderation including moderation :)

I have no guilt eating this every 6 to 8 weeks but they are very high carb (44 grams/svg) so if you are VLC, like me, then it can get a little sketchy. I just made sure it was eaten around 6 pm so I wouldn't suffer from sluggishness during my day. I was a bit sleepy earlier than usual that night but hey, I enjoyed every bite!

0
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 08, 2011
at 09:22 PM

I guess with agar agar you could make even bacon pasta, some sort. Not so paleo tho. And it wouldnt absorb sauce like real durum wheat pasta anyway.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 08, 2011
at 09:24 PM

http://www.molecularrecipes.com/gelification/agar-agar-spaghetti/

0
0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on May 08, 2011
at 04:49 PM

Has anyone else tried Sea Tangle Kelp Noodles? We don't use them often, but I like them infinitely better than the konjac root Miracle Noodles. The only ingredients are water, kelp and sodium alginate. Not entirely sure about sodium alginate, but it doesn't seem too terribly nefarious.

They're great in stir fries - and amazing in Pad Thai.

paleo-pasta:-has-anyone-found-a-substitute-ingredient-for-flour-that-produces-a-decent-parody-of-normal-egg-pasta?

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 08, 2011
at 05:21 PM

I love kelp noodles but I don't have a local source. Almost forgot about them!

Ee957129d157b9b1225b52131f098e63

(60)

on November 17, 2011
at 12:45 PM

Only thing, if you're expecting a soft noodle texture, you'll be dissapointed. Very crunchy. Funny enough i just ordered the konjac root noodles.

0
Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

on May 08, 2011
at 01:54 AM

Shirataki Noodles.

Get the ones made out of Konjac root, the "original" variety. I hear there's a tofu kind floating around out there, bleh.

EDIT: I've never had them, but I saw them once at Mark's Daily Apple (and they checked out as paleo, if I remember correctly)

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on May 08, 2011
at 02:47 AM

I've had these noodles (not the tofu version) and they are an acceptable substitue... see Shari's tips though for preparation

083f1759ac6bcee7cd5081f6d062c822

on May 08, 2011
at 02:19 AM

Just found a korean grocery store that sells Arrowroot noodles. Kind of similar to cellophane or rice noodles, but paleo at least

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on April 04, 2013
at 08:07 PM

Substitutes will NEVER taste the same as wheat pasta, but these are a pretty good stand in. I like them in stir fries and some other dishes, but they disappoint with tomato sauce (taste great with my hubby's homemade smoked salmon pasta sauce, though).

-2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 08, 2011
at 05:04 PM

rawfood zuhini pasta with tomato sauce. it taste realy nice this rawf zuchinni pasta.

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