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Mediterranean diet cuts risk of Parkinson's in half?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 10, 2013 at 7:16 PM

We have Parkinson's in our family (mother is severely ill, also her grandmother had it). I'm always trying to get my family to eat more Paleo (they eat a very unprocessed diet, but high in grains, low on meat). My sister sent me this article today on the Mediterranean diet as preventative for PD. She knows there are huge flaws in these studies and the way they are interpreted by the media, but still was curious for my thoughts...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2088322/Mediterranean-diet-halves-risk-Parkinsons-disease.html

F0a9dea438e7943fa05da318773e785e

on January 11, 2013
at 01:32 AM

Also hundreds more studies out there relating to PD though if you google them. Check Pubmed out! pubmed.gov

F0a9dea438e7943fa05da318773e785e

on January 11, 2013
at 01:31 AM

I used to be the exact same way! Even now, I love sweet stuff, but I don't keep it in the house and I only bake on special occasions (i.e. my man's bday or the holidays). My neuro warned me that fast carbs like sugar are pure hell for people with neurological disorders and I believe it now that I cut that crap out of my diet. I believe it's helped me with my seizure control because I don't see the highs and lows in my blood sugar. This study isn't related to PD but it's worth a read http://jp.physoc.org/content/590/12/2831.full

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:29 AM

and oregano. Sweetened tea. White spongy bread to mop up the sucuk and egg fat and the leftover olive oil. Lunch was some combination of white rice, meat cooked with tomatoes, eggplant, onions and peppers. Ayran to drink, or even Coke or Fanta. Repeat at dinner, except add lentil soup, salad and yogurt. After dinner, tea, dessert and salted, roasted nuts. Does that sound ANYTHING like the Mediterranean diet touted in the media?

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:26 AM

THANK YOU!!!! This idea of a "Mediterranean" diet is so misleading. Despite a few commonalities, the diet of someone in, say, Antalya is really different from someone in Malta. I lived in both Turkey and Cyprus for years and years before moving back to Canada and I can vouch for the fact that people aren't eating whole grains in either locale. People ate meat, fish, fats, lots of nuts and fruits, cheese and even sweets. A typical day with a Turkish family was a breakfast of eggs, sucuk (a type of spiced sausage), sometimes kavurma (meat), olives, tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers with olive oil

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:03 AM

On the topic of a brain killer, my PD mom eats a lot of sugar. She has no impulse control now (much like some PD patients become gamblers) and food is pretty much her only pleasure. What can I tell my dad as to how it's affecting her brain. Do you think going 100% sugar free could help her cognitive function? (I've tried to get them to ditch grains, no dice).

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2 Answers

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Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 10, 2013
at 07:24 PM

Here's my only problem with that: there is no traditional Mediterranean diet. Feta and olive oil from Greece? Coconut based diet from Cyprus? Goat and grains from Morocco? Swimming in tomato sauce from Italian?

But, I don't even know if that matters for this article. It basically said fruits, vegetables, and pulses were good. Pulses may be verboten here, but the most good out of that is probably coming from the fruits and vegetables.

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:29 AM

and oregano. Sweetened tea. White spongy bread to mop up the sucuk and egg fat and the leftover olive oil. Lunch was some combination of white rice, meat cooked with tomatoes, eggplant, onions and peppers. Ayran to drink, or even Coke or Fanta. Repeat at dinner, except add lentil soup, salad and yogurt. After dinner, tea, dessert and salted, roasted nuts. Does that sound ANYTHING like the Mediterranean diet touted in the media?

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:26 AM

THANK YOU!!!! This idea of a "Mediterranean" diet is so misleading. Despite a few commonalities, the diet of someone in, say, Antalya is really different from someone in Malta. I lived in both Turkey and Cyprus for years and years before moving back to Canada and I can vouch for the fact that people aren't eating whole grains in either locale. People ate meat, fish, fats, lots of nuts and fruits, cheese and even sweets. A typical day with a Turkish family was a breakfast of eggs, sucuk (a type of spiced sausage), sometimes kavurma (meat), olives, tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers with olive oil

1
F0a9dea438e7943fa05da318773e785e

on January 10, 2013
at 07:40 PM

I've never heard such a thing, but the Daily Mail is a rag like most media sources, right?

I've found Paleo to be a bit more helpful than the standard keto for my seizure disorder and my neuro seems to be pleased with the results as well (way less fatigue than standard keto + fewer seizures = happy doc + happy patient). Now I am not sure how it would translate to other neurological disorders like PD, MS, etc. But hey what could it hurt to include more antioxidant rich foods and healthy fats to your diet as with Mediterranean and Paleo diets? I also don't think there is any way of preventing PD if it's going to happen. You can slow the progression certainly if you take care to eat right and exercise, but it's best to get your Omega-3's, get enough fat in your diet and cut out sugar (brain killer).

F0a9dea438e7943fa05da318773e785e

on January 11, 2013
at 01:31 AM

I used to be the exact same way! Even now, I love sweet stuff, but I don't keep it in the house and I only bake on special occasions (i.e. my man's bday or the holidays). My neuro warned me that fast carbs like sugar are pure hell for people with neurological disorders and I believe it now that I cut that crap out of my diet. I believe it's helped me with my seizure control because I don't see the highs and lows in my blood sugar. This study isn't related to PD but it's worth a read http://jp.physoc.org/content/590/12/2831.full

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:03 AM

On the topic of a brain killer, my PD mom eats a lot of sugar. She has no impulse control now (much like some PD patients become gamblers) and food is pretty much her only pleasure. What can I tell my dad as to how it's affecting her brain. Do you think going 100% sugar free could help her cognitive function? (I've tried to get them to ditch grains, no dice).

F0a9dea438e7943fa05da318773e785e

on January 11, 2013
at 01:32 AM

Also hundreds more studies out there relating to PD though if you google them. Check Pubmed out! pubmed.gov

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