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votes

Information Overload?...RANT

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 26, 2012 at 8:40 PM

How much time do you spend on Paleo related stuff? Books,websites,paleohacks? Have you been able to discover any relation to the amount of time you spend and your tendency to follow the paleo lifestyle. Does it make it easier? Or more difficult? Do you tend to cheat more? Does it make you more hungry?

There's no doubt about it, that most the people over here know enough about the paleo lifestyle to live that way. Do we really need to get in the depth of it? Track every macro nutrient? Yes some people like doing that(me), but it becomes an obsession. In the end it all comes down to living your life to the fullest, and i know nobody want's to spend their dying moments wondering if they went above their desired carb limit.

What is the point of this thread? Well it is mainly for awareness, and also trying to get rid ,at least my, addiction to the countless number of blogs, the pointless articles of the stuff i know and limit my time on paleohacks(clearly that's working) Any advice or opinion on this would be great. Yes, this community is awesome but spending excessive time on it can be damaging and let's face it many of us spend way too much time reading up on paleo stuff. It's great that we come here to help people but there has to be some limit.

I know within a few hours i am going to check back on the replies or maybe the thread get's closed. Maybe the best way is to just give up reading about paleo related stuff for a month and see how that goes. Sorry for the rant, but i didn't want to resist.

Response to everyone

I appreciate the variety of feedback, very interesting. Some of you mention great points and i will definitely take them into consideration. However i would like to add that some of you have taken this out of proportionate. But again i don't blame you as i have just re-read the my question/rant . It's nothing serious, neither is it having a negative impact.

Thank you.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on September 27, 2012
at 09:06 AM

Great post, thanks.

Medium avatar

(2338)

on September 27, 2012
at 02:52 AM

+1 for quoting yourself. wow. impressive, really.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 26, 2012
at 11:36 PM

Dan's right. That was pretty condescending. So I gave you a +1

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on September 26, 2012
at 10:16 PM

He made zero points, none, nada... so their was also nothing for me to disagree with. My response is an actual response. the 'get a grip' part was a joke, hence the ' but more seriously...' my inference about his clinical issues or lack thereof was not in the least bit sarcastic, OCD, anxiety, and the such are very serious issues, ones that need help. It was also a rant Dan, a rant. not a sincere outreach for knowledge inquisition or help but a rant. relax.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 26, 2012
at 09:52 PM

That was pretty condescending. Try actually responding to what he said instead of telling him to get a grip, questioning his mental stability and then sarcastically saying "good luck." He raises some interesting points. You can disagree, but please don't down people based on nothing.

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6 Answers

2
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on September 26, 2012
at 10:16 PM

It depends on how you approach learning about paleo (or any topic). If you get bogged down in the details and worry about optimizing everything (http://paleohacks.com/questions/152027/might-the-theoretical-optimal-diet-not-be-optimal-in-practice/) then yes. It's easy to get over whelmed and spiral out of control.

However, if you read everything for the "big picture" to help you form a context and then also allow what you read to refine that context, you start to understand the principles as a whole rather than micro tweaking and worrying about every details.

To give you an example, I'm a Ph.D. Chemist (I don't say this to brag, but to give you context to where I'm coming from). Towards the end of my time as a grad student, I got really quick at reading "chemistry stuff". The reason was that I understood the subject and the ideas and positions of the other big players in the subject. So when I read, for example, Werner's paper on a new method of computation, I didn't have to get bogged down into all the details. I already knew where Werner was coming from so I could just look at what was new in this paper and incorporate it into my context and view of the chemistry world.

This weekend I happened to be reading a new health and diet book and I had the revelation that I'm now at that same expert level in health and diet that I am with chemistry. I don't need to read the details when they mentioned Taubes, or Enig, or anyone else in the book. I already knew them as the major players and could just step back and look at the big picture.

The reason I bring this up is that you can spend hours a day on paleohacks and the like and if you just focus on the details and fine points, you'll get overwhelmed very quickly. However, if you step back and learn where everyone is coming from and fit that into your view of the world you can learn a ton of information without becoming overwhelmed.

I have a "world view" on health and fitness. I read everything in the context of that view. If it agrees, great. If it doesn't I don't worry about the details, I figure out what we have in common, what's different, and then update my world view based on the relative credibility of the author.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on September 27, 2012
at 09:06 AM

Great post, thanks.

1
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on September 26, 2012
at 10:50 PM

Getting a girlfriend (and/or boyfriend) might help.

Incidently, if you're spending that much time on PH, how come you've only got 1k Rep Points?

1
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 26, 2012
at 09:59 PM

"When in doubt, listen to your body." -me

I think the information overload you describe is a lot more prevalent among us paleohackers than we would like to admit. Perhaps not as extremely as you put it, but it's there nonetheless.

I think the message to take away from here is that, in the paleo spirit, we should be attuned to our bodies' needs and wants, and that should take precedent over this wash of information. Eating Paleo is about doing what is natural. So let us listen closely to the messages our bodies give us and consider all the dietary information we are blessed with, compared to and contrasted with our primal urges.

Most of the people here are wrong, anyway, that is, any time someone makes a statement about what is healthful or unhealthful for everyone. Rather, it depends on the person, who will eventually find out for themselves how to make them feel their most vibrant.

I repeat, it depends on the person.

Medium avatar

(2338)

on September 27, 2012
at 02:52 AM

+1 for quoting yourself. wow. impressive, really.

1
81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on September 26, 2012
at 09:07 PM

Get. A. Grip.

But more seriously it seems like you may have some clinical psychological issues that could very well be sucessfully treated with the help of a therapist.

I wish you good luck and godspeed.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 26, 2012
at 09:52 PM

That was pretty condescending. Try actually responding to what he said instead of telling him to get a grip, questioning his mental stability and then sarcastically saying "good luck." He raises some interesting points. You can disagree, but please don't down people based on nothing.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 26, 2012
at 11:36 PM

Dan's right. That was pretty condescending. So I gave you a +1

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on September 26, 2012
at 10:16 PM

He made zero points, none, nada... so their was also nothing for me to disagree with. My response is an actual response. the 'get a grip' part was a joke, hence the ' but more seriously...' my inference about his clinical issues or lack thereof was not in the least bit sarcastic, OCD, anxiety, and the such are very serious issues, ones that need help. It was also a rant Dan, a rant. not a sincere outreach for knowledge inquisition or help but a rant. relax.

0
78964c5cc470f86a5897db8e1ce8e6f9

on September 26, 2012
at 09:35 PM

What you're describing sounds like a mild form of orthorexia nervosa. It's a mental disorder characterized with an obsession with "clean" or "healthy" food. It's related to anorexia and bulimia and can hurt you in much the same ways.

As with any mental disorder, severity varies. There's a world of difference between spending a little too much time on paleo blogs vs. obsessively tracking every micronutrient and stressing over trace contamination of foods you aren't even sensitive to.

Ultimately it comes down to its effect on your life. If you still have a social life and chill out with a margarita every so often, you're probably fine. If you're getting in trouble at work for spending all of your time on paleo blogs and being a shut-in because you have to cook every meal yourself, then you have a problem that likely needs to be dealt with by a professional.

(Disclaimer: I am not a doctor)

0
76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

on September 26, 2012
at 08:51 PM

I'm here as often as the food commercials I’m inundated with...I've taken one addiction IE foods that want to kill me and traded it for an addiction of foods that are now trying to help me live my best life...I’m not sure if I would label any of this as too much or too little…Paleo Hacks is my happy medium.

I will say this, if we’re trying to quantify Time spent here…since so many here grew up eating one way their whole lives learning about “nutrition”…how long should one spend now investing in nutrition that actually works for them…how much Time is that?

Truth

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