3

votes

What is YOUR pulse rate? Whats good or bad?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 30, 2012 at 5:55 PM

Just general really, what is your pulse rate per minute?

What are good ranges?

Mine is 64 but it skipped or paused for a moment, good or bad?

Thanks

F26fbc92b18f4689769d6f8746ea40f7

(334)

on December 06, 2012
at 08:55 PM

Would be a good idea to listen all podcasts with Joel Jamieson (for instance with Kiefer, Robb Wolf ...). I own his HRV Bioforce system and I can highly recommend it. I use it for performance tracking.

43e9d0f324c2fc8b5f283786a1e3bf4f

(419)

on August 31, 2012
at 01:06 AM

As above - heart rate variability is a good thing. Muscles are not metronomes. A rapidly adaptable body is a healthy body, and the same goes for your heart.

43e9d0f324c2fc8b5f283786a1e3bf4f

(419)

on August 31, 2012
at 01:04 AM

If abstracts on PubMed aren't doing it for you, look for a gloss of that peer-reviewed medical literature from a popular source. E.g., https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heart_rate_variability or http://www.livestrong.com/article/374542-heart-rate-variability-and-mortality, with money quote at the end: "Your doctor may someday measure your heart rate variability when you go in for a visit... That's because it has the potential to be more closely tied to specific clinical outcomes than other variables such as heart rate or blood pressure, according to Gianaros."

Ee70ee808f748374744404a00e1c22ed

(1163)

on August 30, 2012
at 11:46 PM

I looked around on pubmed, and couldn't find much that I could decipher regarding HRV and cardiovascular risk. Can you recommend any articles or studies?

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on August 30, 2012
at 07:19 PM

I have the same!!!! What is the chance of that eh?!

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:27 PM

Judging from what others have posted, 75 is probably far too conservative. I doubt it really matters much- still think pulse strength is more relevant to health.

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15 Answers

1
A41e6217f488f91dc8a6154a628d06be

on August 30, 2012
at 09:11 PM

I measure mine first thing every morning (using an iPhone app) and it is generally 42-44 bpm. Before I started Paleo in February and running in April, it was 68 bpm. This time next year, I would love to see it in the Lance Armstrong range of 32-34 bpm, but I suspect that would take a lot more training!

1
0cddf17fbd678b897beeace676b0df92

on August 30, 2012
at 08:51 PM

Mine is in the mid 50s and I work out a lot. Resting heart rate depends on your fitness level among other things.

If your heart skips a beat, have it checked out by your doc. Many times its nothing other than too much caffine but it could be a marker of something serious. Better safe than sorry!

43e9d0f324c2fc8b5f283786a1e3bf4f

(419)

on August 31, 2012
at 01:06 AM

As above - heart rate variability is a good thing. Muscles are not metronomes. A rapidly adaptable body is a healthy body, and the same goes for your heart.

1
Acc01ecfb10e34aeefa686bcdce09094

on August 30, 2012
at 07:24 PM

46 BPM after sitting for a while

1
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:45 PM

64 bpm as I was just walking around and sat down at the computer. Normals have been posted by others, but without history it's impossible to say what "your" normal is.

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on August 30, 2012
at 07:19 PM

I have the same!!!! What is the chance of that eh?!

1
43e9d0f324c2fc8b5f283786a1e3bf4f

(419)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:40 PM

Heart rate variability is the single strongest predictor of cardiovascular disease. If you enter terms like heart rate variability or RR interval variation in PubMed, you will get a ton of abstract hits backing this up. So HRV, not heart rate or blood pressure, is actually what you want to monitor if you are worried about heart health.

And I love this part so much because it's completely counter-intuitive. You want a very variable heart rate. Don't freak out if you take your pulse and it jumps around. That's a GOOD thing.

Anyway, you asked about pulse rate and what good ranges are. Above 70 bpm is associated with higher cardiovascular risks (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18757091). Above 100 (RESTING heart rate) is tachycardia, which can indicate medical problems. Some of the heart rates that commenters have listed here are technically bradycardia (below 60 - abnormally low). That can also indicate health problems, although it's normal for some very fit athletes. (Good for you guys. I'm young and thin, and mine is over 90.)

Ee70ee808f748374744404a00e1c22ed

(1163)

on August 30, 2012
at 11:46 PM

I looked around on pubmed, and couldn't find much that I could decipher regarding HRV and cardiovascular risk. Can you recommend any articles or studies?

43e9d0f324c2fc8b5f283786a1e3bf4f

(419)

on August 31, 2012
at 01:04 AM

If abstracts on PubMed aren't doing it for you, look for a gloss of that peer-reviewed medical literature from a popular source. E.g., https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heart_rate_variability or http://www.livestrong.com/article/374542-heart-rate-variability-and-mortality, with money quote at the end: "Your doctor may someday measure your heart rate variability when you go in for a visit... That's because it has the potential to be more closely tied to specific clinical outcomes than other variables such as heart rate or blood pressure, according to Gianaros."

F26fbc92b18f4689769d6f8746ea40f7

(334)

on December 06, 2012
at 08:55 PM

Would be a good idea to listen all podcasts with Joel Jamieson (for instance with Kiefer, Robb Wolf ...). I own his HRV Bioforce system and I can highly recommend it. I use it for performance tracking.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:16 PM

Just measured it at 72. I've always had a fairly high pulse rate compared to the average/norm, so I don't care too much.

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on August 30, 2012
at 06:13 PM

Mine is between 44 if I am consciously trying to relaxed, and 48 if I'm passively relaxed.

As for a healthy range, I think what matters more is the strength of your pulse, rather than the BPM. So I'd guess anywhere between 42 and 75 is okay as long as it is a strong beat.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:27 PM

Judging from what others have posted, 75 is probably far too conservative. I doubt it really matters much- still think pulse strength is more relevant to health.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:01 PM

I suppose you mean resting heart rate? Mine was 52 last time I got it checked.

Here's a link to a range chart: http://www.topendsports.com/testing/heart-rate-resting-chart.htm

Although, honestly after reading Peter Attia's cholesterol 10 part series... I just don't trust any of these recommendations...

0
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on December 06, 2012
at 10:29 PM

i'm sick so it's been 100-120 for most of this year. when i'm well, it's always 78. i can't wait to get back to 78 again.

0
F26fbc92b18f4689769d6f8746ea40f7

(334)

on December 06, 2012
at 09:02 PM

HR is not a good correlate for cardiovascular health. I compete in Ironman triathlon for a decade and although my heart is structurally intact, its hypertrophy triggered pretty significant intermittent arrhythmia. I actually had to stop competing. Without arrhythmia I have a resting HR of 40, which goes down to 26 during sleep (had to go through 24h holter monitors because of the arrhythmia, that's why I have recordings of HR during sleep).

As mentioned by kat, HRV is a way better marker for cardiovascular health. As I commented on her answer, I own a HRV tracking device. There's also a lot going on in the biofeedback field with devices such as the emWave2, which allows you to gain more control of your brain-heart connection. Great tool for the 'geeky' paleo folks out there :)!

0
Fcd6bd2ee93e882f21f1bf538ff83619

on December 06, 2012
at 06:59 PM

Mines is 98 and I'm 19 year old

0
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on August 30, 2012
at 07:09 PM

Just woke from a nap and it's 58 bpm. That was the same HR that was measured when I had my annual check-up a few weeks ago.

0
76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on August 30, 2012
at 07:09 PM

Mine usually ranges 44-51. A doc once said a pulse like that is usually reserved for those with a heart problem or elite athletes. I know I'm not in the former category (because she sent me for testing), and I wouldn't put myself in the latter.

I think this is a measurement that doesn't have set "good" and "bad" ranges, but is more particularized to the individual.

0
68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:36 PM

48 at the time of this post.

Someone who trains consistently, especially high-intensity lifting, is going to have a low pulse rate. Mine was actually higher back when I did chronic cardio, and right now, I'm in the best shape of my life and do no cardio outside of sprinting, high-intensity or slow walking.

0
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on August 30, 2012
at 06:23 PM

Interesting question -- my resting heart rate has always been fairly high (80s) since I first measured it in high school, running track and cross country. I just measured it at 92. Granted, I'm depressed and near-constantly anxious, but also otherwise physically active and not suffering any physical ailments. I walk a brisk 5-6 miles per day and do light bodyweight every few days for exercise. And I'm technically underweight, though I put no stock whatsoever in BMI-to-health assumptions.

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