2

votes

What do you guys think about Yacon/yacon syrup?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 21, 2011 at 9:29 PM

While browsing around for alternative sweeteners, I came upon this Wikipedia article.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yacon_syrup

Yac??n syrup is a sweetening agent extracted from the tuberous roots of the yac??n plant (Smallanthus sonchifolius) indigenous to the Andes mountains

It comes from a root so that is paleo acceptable.

It was used by the Incas. In Peru people eat yacon because of its nutritional properties???few calories and low sugar levels. In Bolivia yac??n roots are eaten by people with diabetes or other digestive and renal disorders. Whereas In Brazil the dried leaves are used to make yac??n tea, said to be antidiabetic.

Having anti-diabetic attributes piques my interest even more.

It is usually made with an evaporator, like the ones used to make maple syrup.[1] It has a taste similar to molasses or caramelized sugar.[3] In a study by Yoshida et al. (2002), an enzyme solution of yacon was determined to be a better antioxidant than enzyme solutions of potato, mushroom, eggplant and edible burdock.

AND a good antioxidant profile.

The syrup contains up to 50% of FOS (fructooligosacharides). The consumption of FOS does not increase blood glucose.

Not really sure how on board I am with fructooligosaccharides but if it doesn't cause an insulin spike, that seems okay too.

Does this seem too good to be true?

Edit: Found this as well, figured I would add it to the topic.

Tests from the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Peru [July, 2004] tested how Yacon syrup affects blood glucose levels. Participants (60 non-diabetic men and women between the ages of 20 and 60) fasted for at least eight hours before ingesting varried sweeteners. Three groups were given different samples of Yacon, one group was given bee???s honey, another group was given maple???s syrup, and the last was given anhydrous glucose. The group ingesting Yacon syrup had the least blood sugar varriance as measured before and after. These results showed that Yacon had very little effect on glucose levels, while other sweeteners showed an immediate significant rise and a slow decline back to normal.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 07, 2013
at 02:03 PM

Apologies, but this meets our site's definition of unsolicited advertising and will be flagged as spam. It is also not an answer to the original poster's question.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 22, 2011
at 12:59 AM

Forest for the trees. If you're trying to avoid fructose, skip baking generally cuz it's gonna be loaded with sugar no matter what you make: be that sugar derived from yacon, agave, brown rice syrup, malted barley syrup, molasses, HFCS, honey.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 22, 2011
at 12:56 AM

Excellent point namby. Producers of processed products do this all the time: Xplant is low in this high in that etc...so this denatured, isolated, processed product we make FROM that must be good too!;) dubious.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on May 22, 2011
at 12:54 AM

It is true, yacon is like sugar alcohol. It is low glycemic. But notice most of the comments there say how great tasting (like honey) it is. It's a yacon-mix product enhanced for sweetness. I would not use it.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on May 22, 2011
at 12:51 AM

how can it not spike insulin when it says it has 14g sugar? There is no fiber to muffle the carbs. Here, read what the description says: "Yacon is a sweet tasting tuberous root grown in the Andes. It contains inulin, which promotes healthy probiotics. It is a low glycemic sweetener that can be used as an alternative to sugar in drinks and recipes." When it says "low glycemic," they're referring to the yacon, not to their product. They're specifically referring to the yacon in their product. I repeat, the ingredient, not the product itself.

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 11:30 PM

Haha, but I totally misunderstood that you were using Kosher metaphorically and was wondering what that had to do with anything :P

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 11:29 PM

?? Fructooligosaccharides ARE sugars and thus would be listed as carbs. They are apparently undigestible and don't spike insulin so they aren't true carbs in the classic sense.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on May 21, 2011
at 11:21 PM

that is not kosher dude. how does 22g of carbs (and 14g of sugar) in 2 tbsps strike you? that's probably as bad as agave nectar. it might have yacon as an ingredient but it's been sugarfied. when I said kosher, i meant that metaphorically ... not that it's okay for the passover. that one's definitely not kosher. why not just choose sugar, then?

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 11:13 PM

http://www.iherb.com/Navitas-Naturals-Organic-Yacon-Syrup-8-8-oz-249-g/8340?at=0 What do you think about this one? It says Kosher and is USDA organic.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on May 21, 2011
at 10:53 PM

I don't really have a preference between those two. Whichever tastes better.

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Interesting, thanks. Do you think it would be worse to take the hit from refined sugars in yacon syrup or from the fructose in honey, if you had to choose one to use for a recipe.

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 09:41 PM

The problem with honey is that it is a load of fructose. For those of us trying to avoid eating too much fructose, it is not ideal.

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7 Answers

2
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on May 21, 2011
at 09:45 PM

FOS would be the anti-diabetic agent. They get metabolized in the gut to butyrate and that has a positive effect of insulin sensitivity and inflammation. Other sources are jicama, onions and chicory root. As for antioxidants, I didn't know that potatoes and mushrooms were particularly magical in their antioxidant content to begin with. Show me any real food and I'll show you its anti-diabetic and antioxidant properties.

If you want to eat yacon go ahead, I don't think there is any unique benefit to them but they're a good food. Syrup is generally not paleo since processing carbs tends to mean poorer metabolic health. Dose makes the poison with refined sugars. Some people are best served by eliminating refined carbs entirely.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on May 21, 2011
at 10:53 PM

I don't really have a preference between those two. Whichever tastes better.

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Interesting, thanks. Do you think it would be worse to take the hit from refined sugars in yacon syrup or from the fructose in honey, if you had to choose one to use for a recipe.

1
3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

on May 21, 2011
at 10:49 PM

I would check and see if the fructooligosacharide is an external agent put into yacon. If so, I would do some research and see if it's kosher: it seems like an inulin type of prebiotic. Frequently, you'll see bulking agents put into stevia or splenda to make them bulkier (e.g., Truvia). In the process, they include sugar and carbs which the original ingredient didn't have.

Yacon itself, however, should be ok. It is one of the 3 sugar subsitutes recommended by David Getoff, a naturopathic nutritionist who practices in San Diego. He recommends Stevia, Lohan and Yacon.

I have tried stevia and lo han. You can get the two from Swansonvitamins and other vitamin vendors online. But yacon doesn't seem to be available commercially. At least not in the form that I would want to try.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on May 22, 2011
at 12:54 AM

It is true, yacon is like sugar alcohol. It is low glycemic. But notice most of the comments there say how great tasting (like honey) it is. It's a yacon-mix product enhanced for sweetness. I would not use it.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 22, 2011
at 12:56 AM

Excellent point namby. Producers of processed products do this all the time: Xplant is low in this high in that etc...so this denatured, isolated, processed product we make FROM that must be good too!;) dubious.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on May 22, 2011
at 12:51 AM

how can it not spike insulin when it says it has 14g sugar? There is no fiber to muffle the carbs. Here, read what the description says: "Yacon is a sweet tasting tuberous root grown in the Andes. It contains inulin, which promotes healthy probiotics. It is a low glycemic sweetener that can be used as an alternative to sugar in drinks and recipes." When it says "low glycemic," they're referring to the yacon, not to their product. They're specifically referring to the yacon in their product. I repeat, the ingredient, not the product itself.

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 11:30 PM

Haha, but I totally misunderstood that you were using Kosher metaphorically and was wondering what that had to do with anything :P

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on May 21, 2011
at 11:21 PM

that is not kosher dude. how does 22g of carbs (and 14g of sugar) in 2 tbsps strike you? that's probably as bad as agave nectar. it might have yacon as an ingredient but it's been sugarfied. when I said kosher, i meant that metaphorically ... not that it's okay for the passover. that one's definitely not kosher. why not just choose sugar, then?

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 11:13 PM

http://www.iherb.com/Navitas-Naturals-Organic-Yacon-Syrup-8-8-oz-249-g/8340?at=0 What do you think about this one? It says Kosher and is USDA organic.

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 11:29 PM

?? Fructooligosaccharides ARE sugars and thus would be listed as carbs. They are apparently undigestible and don't spike insulin so they aren't true carbs in the classic sense.

1
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 21, 2011
at 09:38 PM

I used to use it when I was a raw fooder. I guess if youre looking for a sweetener in baking or something it'd be fine. It tasted somewhat like molasses I think. If you want something sweet there are probably better options.

Maybe it's too cynical but when I see a liquid sweetener that is from a solid root I feel skeptical as to the benefits from eating it. I suppose it just sounds too processed for me. Wouldn't honey be easier to find, cheaper, and prolly more in line with what you'd like something to taste like?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 22, 2011
at 12:59 AM

Forest for the trees. If you're trying to avoid fructose, skip baking generally cuz it's gonna be loaded with sugar no matter what you make: be that sugar derived from yacon, agave, brown rice syrup, malted barley syrup, molasses, HFCS, honey.

91219405abedbfd400ce00dea242a00f

(1044)

on May 21, 2011
at 09:41 PM

The problem with honey is that it is a load of fructose. For those of us trying to avoid eating too much fructose, it is not ideal.

0
9e30dbc9a0fc1fa003952f9c3556eccf

on July 14, 2013
at 03:54 PM

I'd like to try this. As for honey and agave syrup, I switched from stevia to sweetening my drinks occasionally with honey and most of the time with agave nectar, believing both of them to be healthy. Over time I became sluggish, extremely depressed, confused and developed a roll of fat around my waist. The fat was especially surprising because I've always stored fat on my thighs and my waist has always been pretty flat. After only a few days without it I'm no longer depressed and my waist is flat again. I believe that high fructose sweeteners are dangerous.

0
10121ac7b6beb99c0fbfbf1522c50adb

on July 07, 2013
at 12:50 PM

If something rhymes with bacon but isn't bacon, I can guarantee I'll be disappointed.

0
961c293fc9f9ea8607f760035ce75bd1

on March 09, 2013
at 11:16 AM

Check http://yacon.biz/online.html for Yacon Syrup which has standardized sc-FOS and translucent golden in color.

-1
961c293fc9f9ea8607f760035ce75bd1

on July 07, 2013
at 09:54 AM

Hello Yacon lovers,

Browse http://yacon.biz to look at yacon cultivation at Mt. Camellia, and share the joy and hardship of the farmers who depend on yacon for their livelihood.

Support and Buy Yacon Syrup from Mt. Camellia at http://yacon.biz/online.html

Different from dark molasses of conventional yacon syrup on the market, Yacon Syrup from Mt. Camellia has the following characteristics:

  • Standardized short chain FructoOligoSaccharides (sc-FOS) ;
  • Contains 40% - 60% sc-FOS ;
  • Syrup color: Golden to Amber color, Translucent ;
  • Syrup concentration: 65 brix min., inhibits growth of microorganisms ;
  • No additives, No preservatives, No sulfites ;
  • Agricultural hazards such as Heavy metals, pesticide residue (if any) are removed by physical methods.

Happy surfing !

Bob from Down-to-Earth Charity HK Ltd.

Website: http://yacon.biz

Email: [email protected]

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 07, 2013
at 02:03 PM

Apologies, but this meets our site's definition of unsolicited advertising and will be flagged as spam. It is also not an answer to the original poster's question.

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