5

votes

The Thrifty Paleo

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 12, 2012 at 4:44 PM

Yo! I'm a college student, older, recently returned to America. Started Paleo about 2 weeks ago. When I say Paleo, I mean I got rid of about 80% of processed food. Within a week I had it down to about 90% plus the occasional mistake.

I'm being lax with it so that I ease into. I know how I work, and this is the best way for me.

Reason I'm here: I'm a college student on a tight budget. Right now I'm sticking to mostly the cheapest vegetables that I can get from the farmer's market and co-op (Lettuce, spinach, peppers, tomatoes, radishes, herbs, etc.) Then I buy about 2 dozen eggs at a time, and about 2 lbs of meat every week, at 4oz. per meal, with the meat being in one or two meals per day. I have about 2 or 3 eggs every day.

Basically, I'm looking for a algorithmic, structured, outline of someone else's paleo diet.

I.E. I buy XY amount of A-Z every 3 days, XZ every week, and ZZ rarely, and these are my staples.

I'm trying to break down the diet to the bare minimum, while still eating good, and get my costs down as low as possible.

I'll be keeping a notebook and will update with information in a week or two.

Note: IF is cool, but I am crossfitting, so I don't like to go more than 16 hours, not more than twice a week.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 27, 2012
at 12:18 PM

Sugars leech into water don't they? Carrots in broths add sweetness eg, eating the carrot will net you most fibre and what little else remains. Same to a lesser extent wth more dense items like sweet ptoatoes. When making soup the I've notcied the broth becoming very sweet from the sweet potatoes...

9d7a2890e681e7a0950950489aa569a9

on May 23, 2012
at 02:48 AM

swede - yes, green smoothies can be. my typical green smoothie is 4 cups of greens, an avocado, frozen berries, and ice. Secondly, coffee?? are you referring to the comment about GIVING THEM UP in order to spend more on quality ingredients? yes, give them up. hope that clears up your concerns. ~cheers!

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 22, 2012
at 02:00 PM

Haha yes Jared! Look in the frozen fish area for wild caught fish. . . there are some gems at ALDI, not kidding!

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on May 21, 2012
at 04:45 PM

Since I go to the University of Iowa, and we have a recently built (2 years ago) complex devoted to all sorts of physical endeavors, and it's included in tuition, I don't pay for a gym membership. My rent is 300/month + groceries, utilities, and spending money. Results in my overhead/month being anywhere from about 600-800.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:09 PM

ALDI's? Really? Every time I go there everything seems so....off, gross. haha Really? I mean, I'll go if you say so.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:08 PM

That completely ignores the purpose of this question, but thanks. :)

B57f7ce9fa211baf8d3b4203c6e0d1e8

on May 14, 2012
at 06:41 PM

Ha, you guys have definitely read more about this than I have. I'm not coming at this from any particularly scientific perspective--it's just something I've noticed for myself since I eat so many sweet potatoes. I order mine directly from a farm in 40 lb cases, and when I run low while waiting for my next order, I start pressure cooking instead of baking to make them last longer. I don't know if this because of GI effects like jo60 talks about, or the notion of "resistant starch" like Matthius mentions, or even if it lowers palatability and that's indirectly causing it... but it does work!

1dd1d4bde5b46b4c90efeadea3a96a75

(180)

on May 14, 2012
at 04:09 AM

Animal fat/protein should be the basis of a paleo diet. You can get by without it but it's definitely not optimal. There's plenty of cheaper cuts of meat/fish.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 13, 2012
at 05:01 PM

Rice and spuds vs. green smoothies. Fight fight fight!

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on May 13, 2012
at 04:39 PM

Nice Answer Forecer Young!

B87431602552dd87c8a7b40cf1f24e89

(90)

on May 13, 2012
at 03:24 PM

To be clear: I do not think eating livers every day, all year round is a good thing. I also don't believe any sane person would concentrate on any one type of meat or fruit/vegetable for an extended period of time. Besides, from what I understand vitamin A for example (v.high in the liver) is fat soluble therefore not a problem in HFLC diets.

Cccb899526fb5908f64176e0a74ed2d9

(2801)

on May 13, 2012
at 09:31 AM

Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't different cooking methods also alter the amount of absorbed starch? I think I read at some point that cooking and subsequently refrigerating potatoes substantially increases the "resistant starch" content.

Cccb899526fb5908f64176e0a74ed2d9

(2801)

on May 13, 2012
at 09:28 AM

+1. Do try to get some quality animal protein in your diet as well though, OP. Egg protein is cheap and highly bio-available.

Cccb899526fb5908f64176e0a74ed2d9

(2801)

on May 13, 2012
at 09:27 AM

Because organ meats are so nutrient-dense, wouldn't making them a major source of calories entail potential vitamin toxicity?

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 13, 2012
at 02:30 AM

hmm what do you mean by that? yield more energy. x calories /g for CHO. cooking effects GI but how does it make it yield more energy?? "The way you prepare sweet potatoes makes a difference in their GI. The GI of a 150-g sweet potato, boiled with its skin for 30 minutes, is 46. That number rises to 94 if the same sweet potato is baked for 45 minutes. These dramatic differences come from the way the starches in sweet potatoes gelatinize during cooking. " http://www.livestrong.com/art You do not want a high GI blood glucose spike . Boiling the potato keeps it lower but it still yields xCHO/g.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on May 13, 2012
at 02:02 AM

Says the one who recommended a pure glucose diet...? A green smoothie can be "paleo" and a great source of cheap, concentrated calories if you base it around a can of coconut milk.

0361cceaf703c92f99848b078bfc9f67

(225)

on May 12, 2012
at 08:37 PM

green smoothies are Paleo? Coffee? this is why the term Paleo is a joke. You can find an excuse to call anything you like "paleo."

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18 Answers

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9
E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 13, 2012
at 01:40 AM

I am going to suggest rather than trying to establish a constant diet, that you begin to add your most desired staples such as coconut oil/milk, olive oil etc. and shop for the other "fresh" foods such as veg and meat by price/lb and by "specials". That is how I shop. I basically purchase whatever meat and veg are the best price. I do have my preferences but I am also not very fussy so if somthing is expensive one week I just substitute.

Some weeks I eat mostly pork, if I see salmon (canned) on sale I will purchase it even though I may not eat it that week. If some cuts of beef are on sale I may purchase/freeze them. If you set your self a reasonable weekly budget with a 1 x/mth "stock up" of certain (dry goods-oils etc)items you should be able to keep your costs down.

I always try to shop ahead with staples or things that can be frozen on the other hand if you have something planned and the grocer has a great alternative sale..go for it. If you do eat fermented dairy often one or the other of an item-cheese/yogurt will be on sale.If avocadoes are 4/5.00 I will buy them. If they are 1.99 each I will not. If you give up or cut down a lot of fruit (which is not necessary) your dollar will go further.

Approach shopping as if you are out in the wild foraging and rather than with a spear and a basket you have a xdollars to hunt with.

9
1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on May 13, 2012
at 01:15 AM

Don't discount frozen vegetables. Spinach, for instance, is dirt cheap frozen, even the organic stuff, and you get much bigger bang for your buck considering how much it cooks down.

5
B4b56fcc5ebad76ed8e1709dedf01f86

on May 13, 2012
at 02:19 AM

Eggs, fruit, and greens for breakfast (frozen spinach and kale are cheap and saute up well). I go through 2 bags of frozen greens a week and 14 eggs, but you might need more. I usually keep good bacon on hand and I throw in a slice every few days.

Lunch is leftover dinner except a few times a week I'll do a can of sardines or salmon with raw veggies and/or pickled veg (anything I can find w/o sugar), mustard, olives, and cheese (if you do dairy). Canned or jarred fish on a simple salad is great, too.

For dinners: if it's just you, this might work each week: Roast several whole chicken legs (to make 2 dinners and 1-2 lunches), make 2 grass-fed burgers (1 dinner, 1 lunch), Pork shoulder (you could braise a pork shoulder once a month and it would make for 1 dinner and one lunch a week for the whole month!), Lamb in whatever form you like (rack, burgers, kebabs - just cook enough for 1 dinner and 1 lunch), Mussels!!! They make a great dinner and take only 15-20 minutes start to finish. Last dinner: grilled or roasted fish - whatever you like/looks fresh.

For sides: I do 1/2 a plate of veg (whatever veg you can get for cheap) plus a safe starch (spaghetti squash, baked sweet potato, plantains cooked in coconut oil, roasted beets & carrots, I do rice sometimes, too :0

You might think about signing up for a CSA at your farmer's mkt. and you would just get a big ole box of what's seasonal veg/fruit wise. Assuming you're in the N. hemisphere, the timing couldn't be better.

There are many recipes that would work for this plan on my blog, but some of them are a bit labor-intensive. Not sure I can mention it here, but should be link-able from my profile.

My staples are minimal (ghee, coconut oil, olive oil, pickled veg, canned fish, mustard, frozen greens and broccoli, some nuts and cheese for snacks, sea snax brand seaweed :)

5
B87431602552dd87c8a7b40cf1f24e89

on May 12, 2012
at 06:48 PM

Organ meats are usually much cheaper than regular meats, and some of them taste similar. I buy livers and chicken hearts a lot. The hearts taste almost exactly the same as regular muscle meat. It is a muscle after all :) As for livers... well I used to hate them, esp. the texture, but I heard them being called "paleo superfood" so I grind them a little, add few eggs, lots of garlic, pepper etc. and fry all of it. It's not only edible for me - it tastes great. The result looks a lot like the spaghetti meat sauce. Add some saut??ed onions and that's a dinner for me.

Cccb899526fb5908f64176e0a74ed2d9

(2801)

on May 13, 2012
at 09:27 AM

Because organ meats are so nutrient-dense, wouldn't making them a major source of calories entail potential vitamin toxicity?

B87431602552dd87c8a7b40cf1f24e89

(90)

on May 13, 2012
at 03:24 PM

To be clear: I do not think eating livers every day, all year round is a good thing. I also don't believe any sane person would concentrate on any one type of meat or fruit/vegetable for an extended period of time. Besides, from what I understand vitamin A for example (v.high in the liver) is fat soluble therefore not a problem in HFLC diets.

4
78972387772c994caa78513a83978437

on May 12, 2012
at 05:16 PM

Asian markets will be your best friend. Sweet potatoes. Depending on where you go to school, making friends with butchers and farmers will also be beneficial.

4
9d7a2890e681e7a0950950489aa569a9

on May 12, 2012
at 05:05 PM

rice is a grain. not really paleo choice there. sweet potatoes can be great, but many paleo followers stay away from white potatoes on a regular basis.

i'd say eggs are the way to go, for sure, to cut costs, and green smoothies. i usually justify my slightly higher grocery bill by accounting for all the eating out we no longer do. if you are already not partaking in the occasional meal out or stopping for a coffee regularly then trade can be harder to see.

best wishes! ~L

0361cceaf703c92f99848b078bfc9f67

(225)

on May 12, 2012
at 08:37 PM

green smoothies are Paleo? Coffee? this is why the term Paleo is a joke. You can find an excuse to call anything you like "paleo."

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 13, 2012
at 05:01 PM

Rice and spuds vs. green smoothies. Fight fight fight!

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on May 13, 2012
at 02:02 AM

Says the one who recommended a pure glucose diet...? A green smoothie can be "paleo" and a great source of cheap, concentrated calories if you base it around a can of coconut milk.

9d7a2890e681e7a0950950489aa569a9

on May 23, 2012
at 02:48 AM

swede - yes, green smoothies can be. my typical green smoothie is 4 cups of greens, an avocado, frozen berries, and ice. Secondly, coffee?? are you referring to the comment about GIVING THEM UP in order to spend more on quality ingredients? yes, give them up. hope that clears up your concerns. ~cheers!

3
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on May 13, 2012
at 04:19 PM

  1. Go to the store as often as possible to get your produce. If you buy a bunch at once and toss it in your fridge until next weeks trip to the store, chances are some it will have gone bad over that time and you've lost some money. Personally, I go to WF for produce every day if I have the time.

  2. If you are really squeezed for cash, don't buy items not on the dirty dozen organic. for instance, oranges are probably fine to eat conventional.

  3. canned tuna and canned salmon are great, cheap, and convenient sources of protein, and omega 3s.

  4. A descent stash of frozen veggies are great to have on hand

  5. roots and tubers wills save you tons of money if you handle them, as opposed to getting those calories from added protein or a wider variety of non-starchy vegetables.

  6. Make friends with the produce (and seafood) department. They are usually very nice and will often hook you up with deals, or even sometimes give you stuff on the house.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on May 13, 2012
at 04:39 PM

Nice Answer Forecer Young!

3
Medium avatar

on May 13, 2012
at 04:02 PM

First, I think anyone trying to eat paleo on a low budget needs a crock pot (slow cooker) and a vacuum sealer. I got my crock pot for $30 and my vacuum sealer for $20.
With the slow cooker, you can easily make no-fuss paleo meals from cuts of meat that are cheap because they aren't tender unless cooked at low temps for long periods of time- cuts like beef tongue for instance. I recently saw a 2 pound beef tongue at the grocery store for $3.49. Compared to $6 or $7 for one pound of steak, it's a great deal. A slow cooker also makes it easy to make your own stocks from bones which adds nutrients and calories to soups and stews you can also make in your crock pot.

The vacuum sealer is great because like another poster said, often you'll see a great deal on a certain item at the store, and you can only get the amount you can eat in a week. You can use the vacuum sealer in two ways- you can buy more of the foods that are on sale because you can freeze a bunch of it. You can also cook bigger meals (like roasts in your crock pot) and then divide them into individual portions and freeze. This makes it easy to have a variety of food in your freezer that's easy to just pull out and heat up. Having a vacuum sealer also allows you to buy fresh, local produce when it's in season (and the least expensive) and have it all year. I buy local North Carolina strawberries when they're in season and I freeze a couple of bags and dehydrate a bunch with my dehydrator. Not only are you saving money and supporting the local economy, but you're reducing the carbon footprint of the food you eat by choosing to buy local.

Buy canned fish instead of fresh and use in soups to get your Omega3 without spending tons of money. I also buy kippersnacks (they're super cheap at big box stores) and eat them for lunch or as a snack. A can costs around $1.50.

Frozen veggies are generally inexpensive and you don't have to rush to use them before they go bad like fresh ones.

I love buying canned coconut milk and coconut cream. I can find them for cheap at Indian food stores. Coconut cream and milk are really versatile, I find myself using it much more than in just curries.

I think the most important part of staying paleo and on a budget for me is planning ahead. If I know I'll be traveling, I try to make sure I have food for the road with me so I'm not tempted by fast food. If I know I'm headed into a busy week, I can cook a few different meals ahead of time and freeze single portions I can just heat up. This reduces the amount I spend out at fast food or out to eat because I didn't have time to cook or was too tired.

3
B04787f664abf9bebc28f71bf7825a3c

on May 13, 2012
at 02:53 PM

If someone actually shares, let me know too! lol Seriously, people seem to love suggesting "meals" but I've yet to come across what you are looking for on the internet. Heck, even most of the books I've read about Paleo and Primal are like that!

There is a website called Paleo on a Budget which you might find helpful:

http://paleoonabudget.com/

Though I get paid well me and my husband aren't big foodies so we tend to eat the same things all the time, and so I'd also like to get a structured eating plan together & spend less on food...Though I must admit, getting rid of all the junk has helped that greatly! I hate when people don't understand that you spend way less on food when you aren't buying all the processed crap anymore...

3
E3d94ade13110237db50b944f89e98bd

(245)

on May 13, 2012
at 02:25 PM

Invest in a simple slow cooker and freeze the leftovers in small freezer bags. Roasts are usually reasonably priced and so easy, just meat, a couple sliced onions and seasoning. Add a cup or so of water for a nice bit of sauce so your frozen meat is nice and juicy. It's hard to beat! Works with pork or beef. Chicken not so much.

Also I buy a rotisserie chicken and make a huge batch of soup with lots of veggies and seasoning. Finish with a cup of coconut milk and it's very filling! This also freezes well.

Buy what's cheap in bulk, cook and freeze in serving size packs. You will spend less and always have great food at your fingertips! I recommend Melissa Joulwan's cookbook Well Fed for the best info on cooking ahead. Plus her recipes are awesome!

3
Da20058e445fa4c5ce328132379521b3

on May 13, 2012
at 02:20 AM

Every week - I buy 20 eggs and 200g of thinly sliced bacon (smoked and cured only with salt) for my breakfasts - alternate different types of meat, fish and organ and bones depending on what's available and cheap, - enough for 12 meals - a cauliflower or other non leafy green vege, and a couple of leafy green veges. Also either some strawberries or 6 apples and one can of coconut cream.

Every three days or rather if and when I think food is running out I'll buy more of whatever's running out. - I walk past a supermarket everyday - between my car and the office so it's not a hassle.

Every time I run out - I buy extra virgin olive and coconut oil, and ghee. I have almost a tablespoon of each everyday.

I buy these rarely - herbs dried or fresh, sea salt, butter, and a very occasional splurge on duck fat which I can eat off a spoon with delight.

I tend to batch cook on Sundays - I work crazy hours, so I have portions in containers ready to go. I may eat out once a week - and I have a half a day of non paleo foods once a week - which is either out with friends or on grocery shopping day. I typically skip about 2 meals a week because of the crazy hours.

Hope that answers your question!

3
886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 01:35 AM

Primaltoad at Primaltoad.com came up with a 30 day meal plan for $200 a few months ago.

Other ideas -- cheap healthy sources of meat -- ALDI has wild caught fish for very affordable prices and no GMO's.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:09 PM

ALDI's? Really? Every time I go there everything seems so....off, gross. haha Really? I mean, I'll go if you say so.

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 22, 2012
at 02:00 PM

Haha yes Jared! Look in the frozen fish area for wild caught fish. . . there are some gems at ALDI, not kidding!

3
361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on May 13, 2012
at 01:28 AM

Buy suet, bones and offals. Inexpensive source of quality fat and protein (also delicious!)

3
0361cceaf703c92f99848b078bfc9f67

(225)

on May 12, 2012
at 04:53 PM

Can't get much cheaper than potatoes and rice. Meat is expensive. Paleo does not have to be a high meat diet.

Cccb899526fb5908f64176e0a74ed2d9

(2801)

on May 13, 2012
at 09:28 AM

+1. Do try to get some quality animal protein in your diet as well though, OP. Egg protein is cheap and highly bio-available.

1dd1d4bde5b46b4c90efeadea3a96a75

(180)

on May 14, 2012
at 04:09 AM

Animal fat/protein should be the basis of a paleo diet. You can get by without it but it's definitely not optimal. There's plenty of cheaper cuts of meat/fish.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:08 PM

That completely ignores the purpose of this question, but thanks. :)

2
B57f7ce9fa211baf8d3b4203c6e0d1e8

on May 12, 2012
at 06:50 PM

Besides messing with the quantity or quality of ingredients, you might also consider how cooking techniques can affect caloric availability for specific foods. For example, boiling or pressure cooking starchy tubers such as sweet potatoes will make them yield more energy than baking or frying them.

Cccb899526fb5908f64176e0a74ed2d9

(2801)

on May 13, 2012
at 09:31 AM

Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't different cooking methods also alter the amount of absorbed starch? I think I read at some point that cooking and subsequently refrigerating potatoes substantially increases the "resistant starch" content.

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 13, 2012
at 02:30 AM

hmm what do you mean by that? yield more energy. x calories /g for CHO. cooking effects GI but how does it make it yield more energy?? "The way you prepare sweet potatoes makes a difference in their GI. The GI of a 150-g sweet potato, boiled with its skin for 30 minutes, is 46. That number rises to 94 if the same sweet potato is baked for 45 minutes. These dramatic differences come from the way the starches in sweet potatoes gelatinize during cooking. " http://www.livestrong.com/art You do not want a high GI blood glucose spike . Boiling the potato keeps it lower but it still yields xCHO/g.

B57f7ce9fa211baf8d3b4203c6e0d1e8

on May 14, 2012
at 06:41 PM

Ha, you guys have definitely read more about this than I have. I'm not coming at this from any particularly scientific perspective--it's just something I've noticed for myself since I eat so many sweet potatoes. I order mine directly from a farm in 40 lb cases, and when I run low while waiting for my next order, I start pressure cooking instead of baking to make them last longer. I don't know if this because of GI effects like jo60 talks about, or the notion of "resistant starch" like Matthius mentions, or even if it lowers palatability and that's indirectly causing it... but it does work!

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 27, 2012
at 12:18 PM

Sugars leech into water don't they? Carrots in broths add sweetness eg, eating the carrot will net you most fibre and what little else remains. Same to a lesser extent wth more dense items like sweet ptoatoes. When making soup the I've notcied the broth becoming very sweet from the sweet potatoes...

1
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on May 13, 2012
at 08:31 PM

Are you simply following the WOD or are you a member of a crossfit gym?

Because a regular gym membership (normally) is about 1/3rd the price of a Crossfit membership.

I'm not telling you to quit your Crossfit membership if so, but personally I'd reevaluate my needs if I needed an extra $75/month on groceries, and my gym membership was $120/month.

1e9164a5a54003ac247d49c574dc7bfc

(396)

on May 21, 2012
at 04:45 PM

Since I go to the University of Iowa, and we have a recently built (2 years ago) complex devoted to all sorts of physical endeavors, and it's included in tuition, I don't pay for a gym membership. My rent is 300/month + groceries, utilities, and spending money. Results in my overhead/month being anywhere from about 600-800.

0
74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

Potaaaaattttooooooes.

Especially if you do Crossfit.

And rice. It's not nutrient dense, but it's tasty cooked in bone broth. Experiment with rice and starches and see how you perform and feel.

I will second and third frozen veggies and meat on sale. Make big batches of food and freeze it. Nuts should be a food used very sparingly. Unless you find a good deal on macadamia nuts, which are perfect in every way.

Buy a little food processor, lightly fry up chicken livers in butter or bacon fat, add some herbs and garlic and transfer to that processor. Blitz that shit up. There. You have nutrient dense, super yummy paté. Eat 1 - 2x a week with carrot and celery sticks.

If you have a good Polish deli around you, see if you can find some good quality kielbasa. Sliced thin and fried in butter with a little mustard and pickles on the side = YUM! A Polish deli may also have goodies imported from elsewhere. For example, I found really tasty sardines in olive oil from Portugal, and cod liver paté from Iceland which was DELICIOUS!

Sardines, tuna, mackerel, wild salmon in cans are also good. Sweet potatoes are also your best friend. Buy coconut oil on sale.

0
9bd96e6af80a526eaf161206d74e6f6b

on April 04, 2013
at 01:48 PM

Emeals.com offers a paleo meal plan. Emeals is a company that provides several different meal plans for budgeting. Yes, you have to pay, but Groupon often has the subscriptions on sale. The subscription costs $5 per month if you buy the 12-month subscription. But you could buy a 3-month subscription for $21 total just to try it out and see if it helps. We got a year's paid subscription for our wedding, and I use the emeals plans for recipe ideas to make my dollar go further. It's helpful for creativity and budgeting. Hope that helps!

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