5

votes

Telomeres size, how to keep them healthy on Paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 02, 2011 at 2:15 PM

According to some recent research the size of our telomeres is one of the key markers of life expectancy: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC149817/ also http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9524755 I wonder what is in the paleo diet that can help us to keep our telomeres healthy, which parts of the diet are more important for this goal. Also which parts of SAD or any other unhealthy diet or habits bring more damage to our telomeres, are there specific toxins that affect them?.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on August 02, 2011
at 07:57 PM

Ambimorph, not only is that an excellent paper, but the sidebar links to dozens of papers of further interest. Many thanks!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on August 02, 2011
at 03:38 PM

Telomere biology is completely tied to mitochondrial function. I wrote a ton about this in my mitochondrial series. Kinda deep science but once you get it.......you will learn how to lengthen or at least not shorten your telomeres too quickly with your life style choices.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 02, 2011
at 02:56 PM

great paper! i hadn't seen that one

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3 Answers

5
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on August 02, 2011
at 02:43 PM

Well, if you combine the facts that a ketogenic diet reduces oxidative stress (see e.g. The Neuroprotective Properties of Calorie Restriction, the Ketogenic Diet, and Ketone Bodies) and that oxidative stress shortens telomeres, there is a pretty clear hypothesis that emerges. The above article lists other mechanisms by which a ketogenic diet may increase lifespan, too.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on August 02, 2011
at 03:38 PM

Telomere biology is completely tied to mitochondrial function. I wrote a ton about this in my mitochondrial series. Kinda deep science but once you get it.......you will learn how to lengthen or at least not shorten your telomeres too quickly with your life style choices.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 02, 2011
at 02:56 PM

great paper! i hadn't seen that one

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on August 02, 2011
at 07:57 PM

Ambimorph, not only is that an excellent paper, but the sidebar links to dozens of papers of further interest. Many thanks!

2
Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on August 02, 2011
at 05:51 PM

Ray Peat has an interesting comment on this in one of his articles, here. And here's a nut graf:

"... [Geron's] argument was that telomeres get shorter each time a cell divides, ... and that this accounts for the aging of the organism. Cancer cells are immortal, because they maintain active telomerase, so the company proposed to cure cancer, by selling molecules to inhibit the enzyme, and to cure aging, by providing new enzymes for old people. However, Hayflick's limit was mainly the effect of bad culture methods, and the theory that the shortening of telomeres causes aging was contradicted by the finding of longer telomeres in some old people than in some young people, and different telomere lengths in different organs of the same person.

But it's true that cancer cells have active telomerase, and that most healthy cells don't. It happens that telomerase is activated by cellular injury, such as radiation, that activates phosphorylases, and that it is inactivated by phosphatases. Estrogen activates telomerase, and progesterone inhibits it. "

So, according to RP, the best 'fix' here (and for much else) is to minimize estrogen and increase progesterone. In his world, this is accomplished by minimizing (or, better, eliminating) all polyunsaturated fats - even those in many vegetables and fish.

His stuff may strongly contradict "paleo" at a few points (he recommends consuming sugar to help the body process protein and to minimize cortisol), but is an interesting perspective nonetheless.

-1
20bb451f1bd1369e2b28698d1d9a8506

(-2)

on March 24, 2012
at 07:02 AM

Dr. Jack Kruse says that cold thermogenesis is the key to longevity and telomere "health". http://jackkruse.com/the-evolution-of-the-leptin-rx/

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