3

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Teff flour!!! Traditionally Ethiopian flour

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 10, 2011 at 7:37 PM

Teff is an exot!

its a flour used by Ethiopian and also other African nearby.

Hope my english is decryptable. Sometimes i sticky different words of each kind together.

Teff flour i just saw it in the local wholefood store here in Germany.
it was reduced. its usually very expensive. so it was reduced from around six euro to three euro.

In Ethiopia they make a traditional bread with it. its a kind of sourdough. Its fermented with water overnight. Maybe some know some athiopian people around. Its some water mixed with teff flour. This is fermenting overnight.

Do you think its ok to eat. Its farmed! Its a flour! ITs gluten free! Its traditionally farmed in small scale!

Have you try it? Have you heard about it? Do you know about the botanics on teff? Is it botanicly a legume or a grain?

About the sourdough injeera bread. Maybe they do it originally a bit different. Imagine Ethiopia has a very warm climate, the sun shines, there is dry dusty wind. Here it is warm in the rooms around twenty degrees. So maybe traditionally Injeera were prepared more carefully over a longer period. I know that some Ethiopians in Germany mix it with wheat, what is horrible cause of the bad issues on wheat. So probably the preperation in Athiopia is slightly different.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eragrostis_tef

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 06, 2012
at 03:17 PM

I was going to add this exact comment. It's worth calling a restaurant ahead of time, and asking how their injera is prepared. Or just make it at home. :-) Injera is basically a pan-bread, and is fairly easy to make ... assuming you can find teff.

A15af22bd729ec030e8f47d1189b6eaf

(774)

on February 05, 2012
at 09:34 AM

Well, all ancestral diet patterns have one thing in common: they are devoid of refinded or processed frankenfoods. It is not so much about macronutrient ratio unless you have a pre-existing metabolic condition or when you are in the process of cutting excess fat ...

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on March 10, 2011
at 09:33 PM

It literally sucked me in off the street when I was hungry and vulnerable. And I had the great joy of watching my dignified 79 year old mom eat an entire meal with her fingers.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2011
at 08:46 PM

I've eaten injera recently because I couldn't resist an Ethiopian restaurant ** so sweet

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on March 10, 2011
at 08:46 PM

There's something wrong about eating kitfo without injera, so it's a necessary evil. ;)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2011
at 08:46 PM

I've eaten injera recently because I couldn't resist an Ethiopian restaurant so sweet*

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6 Answers

2
D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 05, 2012
at 05:35 PM

It's very common for Ethiopian restaurants/cooks to use some gluten-containing flour in their injera recipe - makes it easier to work with, and it's not like their audience usually cares. You really can't assume that it's GF.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 06, 2012
at 03:17 PM

I was going to add this exact comment. It's worth calling a restaurant ahead of time, and asking how their injera is prepared. Or just make it at home. :-) Injera is basically a pan-bread, and is fairly easy to make ... assuming you can find teff.

2
Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on March 10, 2011
at 08:16 PM

teff is actually a grass. i wouldnt eat it frequently, but as a yearly GF cheat meal, i think its a hell of a lot better than a pizza! and ill take ethiopian food over almost anything else for a good night out. being fermented is an added bonus. probably in the column of leas-of-all-evils-but-still-kind-of-evil. i wouldnt stock it in the pantry, for sure!

1
C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on February 05, 2012
at 07:09 AM

I have a friend from Ethiopia. She is absolutely gorgeous. Skin, teeth, bone structure, hair, weight etc. She says that beauty is highly prized back home and she thinks that there she is considered unattractive. Yet here she would be considered a 10+ out of 10. Kind of makes me wonder... if people are generally glowing with health then maybe we should look at their diet etc.

It is all so damn confusing. Low carb and high animal fat vs the high carb diets of some cultures that are considered to be very lean and long lived (asian, african etc). Plus the whole premise of paleo that says we eat like our ancestors...(who most likely came from Africa and Asian cultures). sighs

A15af22bd729ec030e8f47d1189b6eaf

(774)

on February 05, 2012
at 09:34 AM

Well, all ancestral diet patterns have one thing in common: they are devoid of refinded or processed frankenfoods. It is not so much about macronutrient ratio unless you have a pre-existing metabolic condition or when you are in the process of cutting excess fat ...

1
1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

on March 10, 2011
at 08:01 PM

Teff is a grain. It's not paleo. It's not an optimal food.

However, I do sometimes eat injera with Ethiopian food from sources I trust as a less-destructive "cheat". Being fermented really helps.

1
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on March 10, 2011
at 08:00 PM

I've eaten injera recently because I couldn't resist an Ethiopian restaurant (old favorite.) I suspect that teff would have the same problems as other non-gluten containing grains, and possibly some more because the bran and germ would form a larger proportion of the grain. There really isn't a lot of space in those seeds for a lot of starchy endosperm. So - better than wheat, better than non-fermented, but I'm not going to make it a regular or even irregular part of my diet. Dinner was fun, and I suffered no obvious ill effects, but there are other, less risky starchy foods.

Add: Teff is a grain. http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/cropfactsheets/teff.html

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2011
at 08:46 PM

I've eaten injera recently because I couldn't resist an Ethiopian restaurant ** so sweet

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2011
at 08:46 PM

I've eaten injera recently because I couldn't resist an Ethiopian restaurant so sweet*

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on March 10, 2011
at 08:46 PM

There's something wrong about eating kitfo without injera, so it's a necessary evil. ;)

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on March 10, 2011
at 09:33 PM

It literally sucked me in off the street when I was hungry and vulnerable. And I had the great joy of watching my dignified 79 year old mom eat an entire meal with her fingers.

0
9b1da5c61c41bb93afb668f9ab3bc76a

(422)

on March 10, 2011
at 10:26 PM

I ate at an Ethiopian place recently and I got the same reaction afterwards (IBS!) as I do from most breads. I suspect this wasn't a typical injera though, since they also said it had barley in it.

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