-2

votes

team bullshit, health police is out with another one today- vitamin D causes cancer.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 27, 2013 at 3:11 PM

it doesn't get much worse than this http://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/skincancer/28042?xid=ob_&utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=oncology&hr=ob

62fafa8cb15af7c562fa8c270f7b6174

(619)

on August 28, 2013
at 01:20 AM

... anger leads to hate, hate leads to spam ...

0f44d81f247518d6fc2de0403ff9a68a

on August 27, 2013
at 07:14 PM

Agree with MathGirl72; it's not a question and the title is poor as well. You should have phrased you "question" differently; maybe ask for opinions on this studies or whether we believe there is some truth to it and chosen a neutral title like ("Does vitamin D cause skin cancer?")

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 27, 2013
at 05:55 PM

Vitamin D linked to skin cancer becomes "vitamin D causes cancer". Who's BSing? ;) The article is rather muted in its conclusions.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on August 27, 2013
at 05:46 PM

I think you live in a fantasy world if you think that all this is easily explainable with one conspiracy theory rather than a whole lot of people listening to each other rather than doing their own research, lots of people trying to make a profit, and all sorts of other factors combined together. Also, yellow rice may be very helpful for those in the developing countries that simply don't have access to as wide a range of foodstuffs as privileged people in first world countries. You limit your knowledge when you put such strict controls on what constitutes evidence.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on August 27, 2013
at 04:54 PM

Is there a question here?

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on August 27, 2013
at 04:32 PM

For that matter, just last week end the NYT was touting yellow rice as the solution to the world's nutritional deficiencies. It is still rice...

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on August 27, 2013
at 04:30 PM

Yet I see a lot of articles on cholesterol, on low fat diets, on vegetarian diets, on sun protection, in places like the NYT or USA Today. Surely Foxnews or NBCnews do the same. What do you make of it? My doctor tried to put me on statins, because my total cholesterol was 208. My father did not have the luxury of the Internet to defend himself, and was put through 5 years of margarine as the sole fat and five of corn oil as the sole fat, with disastrous consequences. My best friend is fairly high in giant pharma and he will defend everything they sell. I think you live in a fantasy world.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 27, 2013
at 03:48 PM

Additionall the article states, "...the relationship between vitamin D and skin cancer is complex and studies have yielded conflicting results... some research suggests that vitamin D might reduce the risk of basal cell carcinoma, but other studies have had the opposite outcome."

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 27, 2013
at 03:43 PM

-1 for mutlinational corportion conspiracy theories.

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3 Answers

5
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on August 27, 2013
at 03:45 PM

How is this bullshit? They found a bonafide correlation -- that, I might add is not surprising in the least -- between vitamin D levels and skin cancer.

The best way to get vitamin D, if you can, is having healthy cholesterol levels coupled with routine exposure to ultraviolet radiation. However, exposure to ultraviolet radiation increases chances for skin cancer. There was bound to be a tight correlation between these two.

Did the article tell people to stop going outside and drink plenty of vitamin-D fortified milk? No - in fact, it went out of it's way to mention that this study was done only at one institution, and should be repeated.

I call bullshit on you, sir!

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 27, 2013
at 03:48 PM

Additionall the article states, "...the relationship between vitamin D and skin cancer is complex and studies have yielded conflicting results... some research suggests that vitamin D might reduce the risk of basal cell carcinoma, but other studies have had the opposite outcome."

1
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12672)

on August 27, 2013
at 05:54 PM

This is one observational study, so it's a bit preliminary to make conclusive statements from, but one interesting idea is that vitamin D has a depleting action on vitamin A (1).

Since vitamin A (retinol) supplementation significantly reduced the risk of non-melanomic squamous cell carcinoma (one of the two types said to be increased in higher vitamin D people) in the Southwest Skin Cancer Prevention Study (2) this could be a reasonable explanation for this finding. Upping your vitamin D when near deficient in vitamin A could cause some problems.

High vitamin D could also track sunlight exposure, which could mean sunburns, which are associated with an increased risk of these cancer.

But again, I would still take this study with a grain of salt for the time being.

-3
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on August 27, 2013
at 03:34 PM

As long as there are multinationals selling things (in this case, SPF-50) there will be planted articles, in the mainstream media and in peer reviewed journals. Really, the only evidence you can thrust is antropological studies of traditional groups. You can trust published results coming from places other than the US and the UK a little more, because there is less complicity (and less of a profit motive) between researchers and industry. You can use published results if they help understand the underlying reasons for existing differences between ancestral groups.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on August 27, 2013
at 04:32 PM

For that matter, just last week end the NYT was touting yellow rice as the solution to the world's nutritional deficiencies. It is still rice...

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 27, 2013
at 03:43 PM

-1 for mutlinational corportion conspiracy theories.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on August 27, 2013
at 05:46 PM

I think you live in a fantasy world if you think that all this is easily explainable with one conspiracy theory rather than a whole lot of people listening to each other rather than doing their own research, lots of people trying to make a profit, and all sorts of other factors combined together. Also, yellow rice may be very helpful for those in the developing countries that simply don't have access to as wide a range of foodstuffs as privileged people in first world countries. You limit your knowledge when you put such strict controls on what constitutes evidence.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on August 27, 2013
at 04:30 PM

Yet I see a lot of articles on cholesterol, on low fat diets, on vegetarian diets, on sun protection, in places like the NYT or USA Today. Surely Foxnews or NBCnews do the same. What do you make of it? My doctor tried to put me on statins, because my total cholesterol was 208. My father did not have the luxury of the Internet to defend himself, and was put through 5 years of margarine as the sole fat and five of corn oil as the sole fat, with disastrous consequences. My best friend is fairly high in giant pharma and he will defend everything they sell. I think you live in a fantasy world.

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